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Discussion Starter #1
I was given a 1982 Honda Silverwing gl500.
It starts and runs.
I bought a new battery for it and it started up. I let it run for about a half hour.
Shut it off to run an errand came back, and the battery was dead.
I found the connector for the stator check.
It wasn't connected to anything, just tucked away, along with other wires.
Here are some pics, can anyone tell me how they should be connected?
I have 4 pics of the different connectors.
Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you guys, I have a feeling the regulator/rectifier is missing.
Anyone know where it would be located on the bike?
 

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The first thing you need to do is get the battery re-charged. Sitting in a discharged state even overnight can cause a lead acid battery to loose some charge capacity and if it is below freezing the electrolyte can freeze and warp the plates, ruining the battery.

Welcome to the forum. Please add your location to your profile and your bike's model and model year (NOT year first registered) to your signature (see Forum Settings link in my signature) so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget.

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike has had 38 years of Previous Owners who may or may not have done the maintenance necessary (or even kept the bike complete enough) for it to be safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage. I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel because old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet. If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid).
 
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