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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm deep into the hateful ordeal of changing tires, (CX500, 28000 miles).



Finger probing, visual inspection etc indicate that the wheel bearings have no slop, no "gritty" feel. But since I have things apart am I just obsessing and being overly cautious to think of replacement. Getting the bearings out of the hub looks like it could be a bugger. Any home-brew methods that anyone may suggest will be considered... how have you successfuly done this? Haynes manual recommends a puller (expensive I'm sure). They also suggest a last choice "drift" method that gives me pause.



Is 28000 miles "young" for bike wheel bearings and 30 year old but apparently still good grease?



I will replace the dust and grease seal (front) and "O"-ring (rear) for sure.



Hoppy
 

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This was the first thing I did on my bike (it was at 28000 miles), it was very easy. Don't bother buying a puller unless yuo want to save the bearings to use again. Don't bother with that, just spend a few bucks and get a new set. I would say change them now, you don't want to be riding at 70 mph and suddenly have a catastophic wheel failure.
 

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I just flipped it and tapped it out with a screwdriver btw. Putting the new one in required tapping on it with a rubber blank and a rubber mallet. That was actually the first post from this forum I looked at, I would look it up but I know blindstitch already has the exact link somewhere in his head.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks "marn..",



Front bearings out. Old screwdriver, hammer and a little hand ringing.



What grease there was in the bearings was a little sparse. Glad they are out. The old grease is yellow which I assume was OEM from factory. I have new parts in my stash.



I'll be back after dinner as I have a few more questions/comments. Must go do some domestic things before my wife gets home.



Hoppy
 

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Ditto to the above.It's not just the mileage but the age decay of metal and pre-packed grease plus you don't know what kind of work they have had to do,road conditions.



If you replace all four you have made your own,"New" service point and if in continual forget them for many tens of thousands of miles,



If you look at this high mileage example



http://globalcxglvtwins.hostingdelivered.com/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=289



no mention of the wheel bearings being changed but the bike has been in continual use.



 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The genuine Honda bearings I have appear to have the same type grease as what was applied to those I have removed. I've no idea when these "new" bearings were made and packed. Tommorow I will get some known "modern" wheel bearing grease and repack them. It's not that I am accusing the OEM grease of being bad, just that formulations available now may be better.



The grease in the bearings I removed had not hardened much if at all. However, only about half of the space available around the balls/cage had grease. I'm glad I'm replacing them.



Hoppy
 

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Shep, that post had me going for a second. Listing all the parts replaced, with the number of times replaced, and then tachometer 143k. Makes it look like they replaced the tach every mile.
 

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lol....catastrophic failure.....Ive replaced hundreds of bearings, and do you know how many wheel bearings I have ever seen suddenly fail? Zero...they loosen up over time, plain and simple. make sure they have grease and no slop and you are good to go.
 

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Strange how the Motorcycle Manufacturers have used off-the-shelf standard press-fit roller bearings, isn't it? Well, they work. At the moment, the front and rear wheels on the daily-driver 80-CX500C are tight and quiet. Knock on Wood.



Montana Clifford
 

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I wonder. I've owned the 80 CX500C for a couple of years, but it's 31 years old. I wonder how many miles it REALLY has been ridden?
If I knew for sure, I might not be so willing to ignore those wheel bearings we're talking about.



Montana Clifford
 

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Change them. They are cheap enough, at 30,000 miles, I'd just do it. I use bearings with shields on both sides, so there is no need for grease. Not sure of the Honda number, mine were #6302, just buy them from a bearing place. If there is any gritty feel when turning the bearing, replace them, they should turn with no noise or "gritty" feel.
 

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Change them. They are cheap enough, at 30,000 miles, I'd just do it. I use bearings with shields on both sides, so there is no need for grease. Not sure of the Honda number, mine were #6302, just buy them from a bearing place. If there is any gritty feel when turning the bearing, replace them, they should turn with no noise or "gritty" feel.
 

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bear351c,



I agree with replacing them at that mileage - even new sealed bearings need to be checked for their capacity - slip out the seal on one side and see how much grease is in there - manufacturers only put in enough - they are never really PACKED, as when they are hand done..but the older style bearings were not sealed either - hence the need to check and repack them every so many miles/k's.



 

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I have had to replace one or more of mine over the years on advisement from my MOT(Road Worthiness Certificate) mechanic.As I was unsure of the condition of the others I replaced all four on both my CX so I knew they were new.I didn't see the point in leaving bearings in that I didn't know the age of for the small cost of replacement.



YMMV



HTH
 

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Those are the same bearings in the drive end of a lot of alternators and ribbed belt idler pulleys/tensioners. They get years of high speed rotation in a hot environment without much concern or sudden failure. If they are rough or have play, replace them, or if you have them out and they are cheap, go ahead and put in new ones if you have the urge.
 

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Considering they cost next to nothing I'm going to eventually replace mine - due to the age, not because of 12K miles.



Grease kind of dries up over time, even in a sealed bearing, and I'm sure it loses some of its original properties.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
In regard to reassembly of front and rear wheels, bearing replacement: I have confusion.




Honda Service Manual... "Pack all bearing cavities with grease" Pg 13-7



Haynes Manual... "... pack the hub center no more than 2/3 full (grease). Chapter 6, Wheel bearings: removal, examination and refitting



Clymer Manual... "Pack the wheel hub and distance collar with grease" Chap 9, Front Suspension and Steering, Front Hub, Assembly



I have removed bearings from four different front and rear hubs and have never found any grease in the hubs. And I'm quite sure this is original factory assembly.



So... should I put grease in the hubs? Was I AWOL when the order to pack hubs with grease was given?



Hoppy
 

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lol....catastrophic failure.....Ive replaced hundreds of bearings, and do you know how many wheel bearings I have ever seen suddenly fail? Zero...they loosen up over time, plain and simple. make sure they have grease and no slop and you are good to go.


Wheel bearings will give ample warning before failing, they start with a grumble, then can go to a screech, at which time the wheel will wobble...for thousands of miles to the point where any sane person will replace the thing. That being said, it's cheap, why not replace if you're already there, or at least give them a good greasing.



The only time I've ever heard of wheel bearings seizing on a bike and causing catastrophic failure was the Triumph recall in the early 2000's. IIRC a couple of people died because of that, but it was a defect, something about the supplier using plastic races instead of metal.
 
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