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I've been lurking on the forum but this is my first post. I have an opportunity to purchase a 1980 CX500. Supposedly, this bike ran when it was placed in storage four years ago. No one has tried to start the bike recently. Of course the batter is dead and the bike is in need of repairs. What would be a fair offer for a 30 year old CX500 that's been in outdoor and indoor storage for the past four years and unknowing if the bike will start? Also, what are some of the specific things to look for when purchasing a CX500? Are there specific areas that are prone to rust or failure?



Thanks for all your help!
 

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FIrst off make sure the owner has the title. From there I'd look at the overall shape the bike is in physically and see if the motor is seized. Feel the person out. Maybe you can get it on the cheap. For something not running I wouldn't go more than a $1 /cc from someone I didn't know even if it looked to be in really good condition. If it is 'such a cherry why the heck don't they have it running'. I try and have the 'there are always more of this out there mentality'.

There is a checklist on this forum for things to look for.
 

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As Linny says, title first. They are a bit of a hassle to get if you don't get one with the bike. Depending on overall looks of the bike, I would start at $250, with the idea of maybe going up to $350 in the negotiations. Remind the seller that you don't even know if the bike will turn over. (or try jumpering from your car to try to crank) Even if it turns over, I would make a list of what probably needs to be done and the approx pricing to show him. A good running, clean bike like this would probably sell for $1200-$1500. But here is a list you can use for justifying the low starting price:



1. New tires--- $150, if you can change them yourself. Otherwise add another $60

2. Carb rebuild --- $80, and 8 hours labor

3. Water pump seal ---$40, and 4 hours labor

4. Cam chain and guides ----$175, and 4 hours labor

5. Stator--$215, and 4 hours labor

6. Battery $50

7. Brake renewal (MC and caliper kits)---$75, and 6 hours labor

8. CDI box-- $160, or equiv repair 2 hours

9. Coolant change, oil change and filter, rear end oil, brake fluid change, air filter, new plugs, --- $75. 4 hours labor

10. Gaskets, O rings, seals, etc when you pull the rear cover for stator, etc ---- $60

11. New tapered stem bearings --- $40, and 6 hours labor

12. General paint touch up, cleaning, waxing, chrome cleaning, polishing --- $50 and 200 hours labor



If you add these up, you'll come up to about $1200, plus the cost of the bike. That doesn't even count labor. You may not need all of this to get it running, but I'll bet that you will easily spend $800 on practically any restore. Is it worth it? If you enjoy bringing a classic back from the dead it is. Just doing it for the money? Not a chance.
 

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Location, location, location. Where are you located? Where is it located? They are worth different amounts in different places in different conditions.
 

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Nice list but not all needs to be done at the same time. Address any safety issues including those that involve the engine's health first then tackle anything else one bit at a time.



I probably started with one of the worst bikes in the forum (and I'll get hit about this) but it ran well enough to make it 24 miles back to base and after a couple of minor things like changing the oil & filter, bit of B-12 in the gas (do not waste your money on Sea Foam) the darn thing acted as if it was ready to take me to San Antonio.



To answer your initial question just buy it, anything under $500 is probably fair of you can swing it. A bit of labor (because most Honda dealers won't work on them anymore) and you'll have a bke that can chalk up to 250K miles with the occasional cam chain -n- stuff.



The title can be a tricky matter but due to the age of these bikes it isn't too hard to step through the DMV of most states.
 
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