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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am getting all this surface rust off my frame, and wondering what all you guys have used on your frame? Lemme know whats the worst, best, okay, most expensive, cheap, etc, etc.. thanks guys..
 

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What you WANT to do with the frame is powder coat, regular paint will scratch when you put it back together, and it'll rust again, but powder coat is the stuff, I heard from a friend he knows a place that might powder coat it for about $45, but I dunno...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
hmm... sounds good to me.. hmmm... I will just wait.
 

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Most places I know of won't touch a frame for under $100.



Personally I would grab some rustoleum in a spray can and go to town. Just scotch brite the frame and wash it down. Then hit it with the paint.
 

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I have used nothing but rust-oleum so far after doing what Blindstitch said. Have seen the other one I sold after 1000 miles and not a nick in it or one flake off it including the motor.



The "textured" paint for outdoor lawn furniture works awesome, is super durable, goes on thicker, and is all I have used so far but colors are limited.
 

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This is what we do with a steel frame at Custom Powder Coating here in Scranton PA.

  • We put the frame in an 800-degree burn off oven. This incinerates all paint, grease, plastic, decals, etc. This also relieves weld stress, which stops frame cracking.
  • The frame is then shot blasted with fine crushed glass. This cleans up the ash from the burn and good-bye to any rust.
  • The frame is then acid washed (Phosphoric) and hot air dried. Phosphoric acid is a rust inhibitor and adds "tooth" for optimum powder adhesion.
  • We then preheat the frame (preheating stops the powder from pulling away from hard edges) then powder coat with a hybrid polyester / epoxy color of customer choice, bake at 400-degrees with a dwell time of 10-minutes. All threaded areas, and non-paint areas are masked and plugged.
  • Using house colors, this costs less than $200 and comes with a 5-year no rust guarantee. Unless it's chipped, it will never rust. Powder coating has come a long way. Color choices are vast and so is the cost for some of the exotic blends. Day-Glo (Fluorescent, glows under UV light / Black light) has an interesting look for those who want to stand out from the crowd. This has been done with the addition of a handful of UV LED's. Gaudy as all get out, nonetheless unique.
  • This is one of the more professional ways of cleaning and painting a frame.
  • There are other ways. I've been caught using a paintbrush. I also like Dupli-Color rattle cans.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
hell yeah thanks for the input! I actually picked up some rustoleum and some sandpaper, I have some steel wool, but it is so fine I just use it on the chrome really.. does it really matter if it is acrylic or oil, I bought acrylic and just plan on doing the frame later in the future when I have time.. right now I just want to stop the rust while I can.. thanks guys!!
 

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To stop rust it has to be completely removed then almost immediately painted over, preferably with a thin coat of etch primer before the color. A coat of primer/sealer inbetween is optional but a good idea as it forms a better bonding surface for the paint.



For rattle can paint I'm sold on Duplicolor. Longer drying time but more a true oil based behaving paint as in fairly tough.



Rust is a funny matter. Once it starts if it isn't completely cleaned off a small speck can be enough of a seed to get it going again.

It's also unusual in that rust expands, taking up more volume than the steel it's forming on thus the reason for paint peeling.



Also nice to hear from another that realizes the merits of Phosphoric Acid. I tend to keep a gallon jug of the 85% around that I can dilute and paint on areas I've removed rust from. What with all the road salt and water, without phosphated iron our car's brake rotors wouldn't stand a chance.



http://www.dudadiesel.com/search.php?query=phosphoric
 

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hell yeah thanks for the input! I actually picked up some rustoleum and some sandpaper, I have some steel wool, but it is so fine I just use it on the chrome really.. does it really matter if it is acrylic or oil, I bought acrylic and just plan on doing the frame later in the future when I have time.. right now I just want to stop the rust while I can.. thanks guys!!
I wouldn't use sand paper on chrome... SOS steel wool with soap, get it wet and try not to be rough, and afterwords you have to keep up on the chrome polish to keep it from coming right back... And for the frame, sand paper won't touch the rust, you NEED to sandblast it. I asked my friend where he thinks they'd powder the frame for $45, waiting for a reply. I think I can get mine done cheap, I just need to get a hold of an old friend who works for a powder coating company, he gets it done free for working there, but he usually charges a little if he has someone elses stuff done... I'll let you know what I find out when I find out
 

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I like brush on rustoleum hammertone paint, the textured surface hides any imperfections and it is tough as nails.Been using it on rollcages in race cars forever.
 

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Conventional wisdom holds true. When it comes to painting anything, surface preparation is the name of the game. If the substrate is not clean, rust and oil free, properly primed and sealed, don't matter what you put on top, it ain't gonna stay. When cleaning steel with no rust, any method will work. Chemical strippers or elbow grease and abrasion. Rust has to be completely gone. It's tough to beat sandblasting, if it's done correctly. Sandpaper will work, although you'll have to remove quite a bit of the substrate to get all the rust and show shiny metal. And it's very difficult to get sandpaper in the seams. Wire brushes (wheels) are helpful. Although I'm still sold on sandblasting.
 

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some stores (particularly boat shops)carry a more retail/commercial type of rust remover. there's also jelly. Even when you think you've killed all the rust, there's probably still more. There ARE rust blocking primers too though.
 

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Depends how bad the rust is and what quality of result you are hoping to achieve. You said it's surface rust, so I would interpet that to be somewhat superficial, light rust - but it's always bad to assume. Of course it is always best to completely remove the rust. Second best is to remove as much as you can practically accomplish or afford. Third best (worst?) is to just cover it up.

If you are doing a museum quality restoration, then you should go all the way - sandblast and powder coat. If your objective is a do it yourself approach that is fairly quick, easy, and inexpensive, then get as much of the rust off as you can by any of the above mentioned means available, then "prime" the areas where the rust was with Rustoleum Rust Reformer, and then paint. The Rust Reformer will react with any remaining bits of rust - the milky white substance turns black where there was any rust, and will prevent it from rusting any further. It forms a hard but sandable surface, but of course you do not want to sand it off completely, and it takes a top coat of paint very well.

I suspect the "rust covering" paints contain some of the same ingredient as the Rust Reformer. I've had great results with this product, even in harsh marine environments.

Also, I see in the POR catalog, that they sell several varieties of paint for rusty surfaces. I have no experience with them, however, if they perform as well as the gas tank sealant product that is so highly regarded, they may be worth a look.

The Rustoleum Rust Reformer may be hard to find in local stores, but there are numerous Internet sources. Also, I believe there are other manufacturers that sell a similar product. I believe that this intermediate step is well worth it for a longer lasting result.

Good luck!
 

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Buy a bottle of Phosphoric acid from http://www.dudadiesel.com/search.php?query=phosphoric



Get off all the loose rust you can with a wire wheel on a drill (far easier than sandpaper) then make up a 10:1 dilution of the phosphoric acid and paint it on with a brush, this will get the final rust and it will convert anything deep to the black oxide of iron which is non-aggressive and can be painted over. Rinse it off with a powerful stream of water.



Remember the mandatory rules for dealing with acid:

1) Gloves and eye protection.

2) Always add acid to water, never add water to acid.

3) Mix up only the estimated amount you'll need to use, you can always mix more.



A little goes a long ways so you'll end up with plenty of the concentrate left but as time goes by you'll find all sorts of other rust not only on the bike but all around the house and possibly even on your car.
 

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Not to be argumentative, but to be mentioned is that museum quality finishing is generally done by the wet spray artists. When it comes to a perfect mirror-like finish, powder is still a notch under the wet sprays. Although we are closing in fast. 90%+ of our blast and powder work is done for "everyman" folks who want an economical, good looking, durable, and long lasting finish on their equipment. Powder has a vast array of applications, from 1800-degree capable ceramics (headers & exhaust) to everyday black. We burn, blast, and coat everything from lawn furniture, automotive rims, engine blocks, sub-frames, quad frames, sprint car frames, snowplows, springs, every conceivable part on a MC, custom Harleys, and pristine chrome. It's a long list! There's even FDA approved powder for food processing equipment.



There are some excellent examples of methods in this thread. Finishing all starts with this thought quoted from OldMan: "Depends how bad the rust is and what quality of result you are hoping to achieve."



Me? I have access to any type of finish I want. I'm using wire wheels, Phosphoric acid, Rustoleum primer & top coat for the unseen parts coz it's all I need. It's cheap, easy, and I have lovely high quality natural bristle brushes. With that method, I realize the enjoyment of doing it my self.



PS: Once powder is baked on, it's a brute to remove. Only aggressive blasting or burn-off will do it. Don't get a "cheap" second rate powder job over rust!
 

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http://rustbullet.com/

Check this stuff. It works well if you make sure you follow directions and make dam sure you get 2 good coats - which is difficult on tubing. The only color is silver.
 

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http://www.colorrite.com/product/honda-nh1z-gloss-black-1282.cfm



I did touch-ups on my 1973 CB350F and my 1983 GL650I frames using Color Rite Honda NH1Z Gloss Black Touch-up Jar, they also produce the primer and clear coat in touch up jars too.



I used a stainless steel brush on my Dremel to remove rust (mainly over welded sections), cleaned with acetone then primed, painted and clear coated: beautifull match!



I didn't want to do the big frame painting job, touch ups were sufficient, in my situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
hmmm.. well I just got time to start, so I will let you guys know..
 
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