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The "standard" is just what they call the first year incarnation of the CX. It's a model onto itself.



some quick tells are:



The forks are smaller (33mm) than the other CX's.



The deluxe has the king/queen seat while the standard has the flat seat.



plastic nacelle, only on the standards



the standards have big wide stripes on the gas tank,and they came only in candy apple red and black (in North America)



The round brake reservoir is also another tell for a standard model vs the rest.



The standard's all have silver comstar wheels, the other's black reverse comstars.



Standard has 18 inch rear wheel while the deluxe a 16 inch.



Standards have black plastic radiator shrouds.



120 MPH speedos on the standards and unique idiot light setup



30+ years out, no matter how may parts have been swapped and frankenbiked, there's always something left that hints at the original.
 

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Cobram, I think all cx's pre 1981 had 33mm forks.


Yeah, I'm pretty sure you're right, I mixed up the deluxe with the later custom. Thanks for setting that straight. I posted a list of all the fork sizes a while ago, but I can't find it.
 

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The general term "Standard" is a class of bike, denoted as one with a flat seat, upright riding position, and with feet directly under the rider. The Honda CB line is a classic Standard layout. The CX Deluxe is a kind of a hybrid Standard because it has the contoured/tiered seat. I believe 1978 was the only year the CX came with a Standard seat (at least in the US).



The CX Custom is technically a cruiser: with the teardrop tank, lower seat, and pegs positioned further forward.
 

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1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
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Same as a Deluxe just not as fancy looking.
Don't you mean "... just BETTER looking?"




OK, at least more "interesting."





I believe 1978 was the only year the CX came with a Standard seat (at least in the US).
There are a handful of '79 Standards. Partly into the model year, Honda pulled them from North America and offered the Custom and Deluxe exclusively. I've only seen one or two in person.





The round brake reservoir is also another tell for a standard model vs the rest.
According the the '79 Addendum in the FSM, the '79 Standard has the later-style square reservoir. Of course, some you may see are a later substitution on a '78.





R
 

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The CX Custom is technically a cruiser: with the teardrop tank, lower seat, and pegs positioned further forward.


I have to disagree with you on this ! Yes the Custom DOES look like a cruiser but the seat is not any lower, it's 31 inches and the pegs are not forward as much if at all like MOST cruisers.



I've always said the bike has an identity crisis in that it looks like a cruiser, but has a tall seat for a taller person but short distance to the pegs for a shorter person and is more comfy riding leaned forward like a "standard" or "touring bike" than a crusier.



It's like a a mish mash of different styles rolled into one.....just my opinion.
 

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Back then I don't think there was a "cruiser" section, bikes were all pretty much standards with variations on the theme.  The Custom name was something all the companies used that basically meant a bike with a relaxed layout and a certain look to them.
 

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I have to disagree with you on this ! Yes the Custom DOES look like a cruiser but the seat is not any lower, it's 31 inches and the pegs are not forward as much if at all like MOST cruisers.



I've always said the bike has an identity crisis in that it looks like a cruiser, but has a tall seat for a taller person but short distance to the pegs for a shorter person and is more comfy riding leaned forward like a "standard" or "touring bike" than a crusier.



It's like a a mish mash of different styles rolled into one.....just my opinion.


Agreed!



This was the beginning of when the Japanese companies began trying to copy American cruisers. The early Japanese "cruisers" are almost comical... it's as if they didn't really understand what a cruiser was, and only copied a few of the characteristics -- like the teardrop tank. They're not bad bikes -- they're just aesthetically jumbled. You said it well, they just seem to have "an identity crisis".
 
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