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Does anybody have experience with crating or palletizing a motor and truck freighting it? How did you do it? How did you weigh it? How much was it? Never done this, considering doing it.
 

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Not bike related, but I had to ship a StrangeRover transmission a while back, cheapest method was truck freight. Instead of building a pallet, wrapping it, draining fluids etc., I shipped the transmission inside a big plastic cooler. Put the transmission in the cooler and wrapped in tape. Used a friends business for pickup (they charge more for non-commercial address pickup/delivery), and may charge an extra tailgate fee if there's no loading dock.



Actual shipping charge when all was said and done was about $70 cheaper than UPS or FedEx wanted. You have to call around and check, everyone is always changing their rates.



There have been several people on this board who have shipped with the bus lines and found the service cheap and reliable.
 

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No doubt if you can go Greyhound it is cheaper provided you deliver to them and the receiving person can pick up at a local bus station.



Truck freight is tricky. Sometimes there's a minimum $ charge and there can be extra charges if they can't load or unload at dock height.



Regardless pack everything carefully, if you can make a small wood crate it's likely to be treated with more respect than if you cover the entire thing with cardboard to make it appear like a box. I'm quite sure Stich can attest to this, if it's in a box and can be handled by one person it's usually just tossed onto a conveyor belt with everything else, scanned for weight on occasion then tossed onto the next truck.



What we ship out doesn't matter as it's hard to "break" textile products so the outgoing boxes are just tossed into the trucks as are most of the smaller incoming packages. The larger shipments are of course palletized, shrink wrapped then loaded via forklift &/or pallet jacks into the trailers while the driver either waits or we give him a ride to lunch. On larger shipments they just leave the trailer with us in one of our (if I can count) 12 docks so we can unload or fill up as we please then call them to tell them to get it on the way.



Greyhound is a good and inexpensive way to go but I would use a coooler with plenty of internal padding in that situation, if going UPS/FedEx/DHL I'd make a crate. Shrink wrap over the item before you put it in a crate. I could send you miles of this stuff for the mere shipping cost as when a roll gets short we toss them even when there's still tons left. Makes great saran wrap like stuff to cover anything but about 10x as tough yet still sticks to itself.



It's a lot thicker but works the same way and my mom and neighbors have found it to be invaluable and far superior. If anyone's interested I'll start an initiative to collect the leftover rolls and would be glad to recycle it rather than throw it away. You'll probably get around 50' - 100' left on a roll but it's very thick stuff, I can probably fit two tubes of it into a triangular mailer and can't begin to estimate the weight as I've never done this.



Even the empty tubes are interesting, buried in the ground they're excellent launching tunbs for home made fireworks.
 

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Well in the question of an engine there should be no problem but as marshall says. If it is light enough to toss it will be. The rules of the conveyor belt are. Items over 70 pounds cant go on them. Only cardboard wrapped stuff can ride them. With the exception of styrofoam. So if you want things to take a slower ride then package it in wood or plastic. If you're worried insurance is cheap.



Directional arrows are always nice but beware if the thing is huge, heavy and looks like it can be rolled it will be. Depending on the distance you never know what could happen.
 

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Forgot about the directional arrows, always a good thing even if you have to print them out and tape them on - really well.

A well cut stencil and some red spray paint might also do the job well.



Red, Orange or possibly yellow would be a lot better than B&W, you've got to remember that the shipping people are devoted to get you your items in as short a time as possible.



Ordered those heat sinks from Mouser last night and at 1 PM today UPS had them right at my front door. It may only be from TX to OK but common UPS Ground, if ordered by 8 PM Central time, gets to me next day.
 

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Does anybody have experience with crating or palletizing a motor and truck freighting it? How did you do it? How did you weigh it? How much was it? Never done this, considering doing it.




I've used 'Yellow Freight' twice for moving engines. Once from California, and the other from Colorado. Both times they were the best price and efficient enough for me. (about a week). The shipper must bring the engine to their depot, and you pick it up at your nearest Yellow freight depot - in my case, Port Huron Mi.



Both engines were on wood pallets - strapped down securely and wrapped with celo. The CX500 engine came in at about 230 lbs. including fluids, and pallet. From California to Port Huron was $200(ish). That was 3 years ago.



Hope this helps.
 
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