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1979 Honda CX500 Custom
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone. On my '79 CX500 Custom, I ran pods for the last two years. I got really good at removing the carbs in mere moments. I've since gone to a stock airbox. It runs great, but I couldn't help but notice how much more difficult it was to install the carbs now that there are boots on the intake and output sides, wedging the carb in there snugly.

I figured you experts would have some life-hacks/tricks for removing the carbs in this current state? Maybe an order of where to remove things? I'm having an issue with stuck floats and butterfly valve, so I need to pull them, but I'm kind of dreading it, whereas it used to take me just a few moments.

Thanks for any tips!
 

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remove seat and fuel tank along with the rear engine hanger above the carbs.

Drain carbs.

Loosen all 4 band clamps. Back the screws right off and slide the clamps out of the way.

Remove the 4 intake runner bolts.

Rotate intake runners upward towards the centre line of the engine and pull off.

Pull carbs forward out of the airbox boots and remove from frame to the left.

Remove choke and throttle cable{s} now that you can get to them.

refit in reverse order.
 

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1979 Honda CX500 Custom
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17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
remove seat and fuel tank along with the rear engine hanger above the carbs.

Drain carbs.

Loosen all 4 band clamps. Back the screws right off and slide the clamps out of the way.

Remove the 4 intake runner bolts.

Rotate intake runners upward towards the centre line of the engine and pull off.

Pull carbs forward out of the airbox boots and remove from frame to the left.

Remove choke and throttle cable{s} now that you can get to them.

refit in reverse order.
Wow, thank you so much! This is exactly the kind of wisdom I was looking for.

Just to make sure I have it straight, when you say "Remove the 4 intake runner bolts," you are referring to these I have circled below, right? Thanks again.

209688
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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Those are the ones.

BTW (for anyone reading this with other models) the same procedure is probably correct for all CX/GL500/650 bikes (except that you don't have to remove the rear engine hanger on later models made after it was discontinued).
 

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and be thankful you dont have a 650 Custom - those are near impossible to remount the carbs and get the airbox insulators fitted correctly.
 

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1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
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Two missed steps.
One, disconnect the crankcase breather hose from the airbox, and unthread it from between the carbs.
Two, after draining the bowls, disconnect the drain hoses. (I forget this one every time.)
Also, once you've pulled the carbs out the left side, you can lay them atop the frame to disconnect the cables.
 
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1979 Honda CX500 Custom
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17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sanrico: Just curious why you went back to stock and did not continue with the pods.
Sorry for the late response - I didn't realize there was a follow-up question.

In my case, I am restoring my CX to stock form. Without the airbox, my battery was just bungee-strapped in there, sliding around. And my side covers were zip-tied to the frame. Hardly ideal. I really want my bike to be bone-stock, like 1979.

More importantly, I kept reading where folks were saying it's difficult to make the bike run smoothly with pods, which was certainly true in my case. I figured the bike was designed and jetted for the stock box. Sure enough, it runs quite well now. And now the battery and side covers now have a place to live.
 

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Out of frustration on a number of different bikes I have made use of a stiff 1"x1" oak stick a couple feet long for prying stubborn carb banks off, and also back on to get things snug tight before tightening the band clamps. Wood so it doesn't gouge anything and used with caution so nothing breaks, of course. There's usually something in the frame or engine that you can wedge against.
 
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