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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1981 CX500 with air pressure front end. Am going to trailer the bike South for the winter. When tieing the bike down on the trailer will it hurt the seals on the front end to be compressed for 3-4 days? Should I just tighten it down when the trailer is on the road and let the tie downs loose when I stop for the night.

Thanks Ken
 

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i am not to sure are they the stock seals?? i had my seals blow out right after my forks were compressed but i am not sure if them blowing out was from the forks being compressed or not they were the stock seals so the way i look at it is like this you have a 50 50 chance i dont think you have to compress the forks all the way if you can i would hook the handle bars each side and near the grab bar both sides and to your trailer that way you compress your forks a little thats the way i transport a bike and it works great you can also put it in gear and leave it on the side stand that way you dont have to worry about it rolling around



just my two cents.....
 

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I don't think you will have any problems leaving the forks compressed for several days. The seals are not really under pressure when compressed, the springs are, but there shouldn't be much if any pressure on the seals. I just noticed you have air forks, but I still don't think you will have any problems.



I would compress the front end at least half way for transport. Use tiedown points as close to the triple tree as you can. The bars may bend if subjected to a big pothole, and the bike bounced. I would also use the upper shock mounting area for the rear tiedown. The higher you can attach to, the better. Also compress the rear end half way to keep it from sliding. As an extra precaution, if you have a wood bed on the trailer is to screw down a couple of two by fours along side the tires, front to back. Or short blocks on either side of the wheels would work too. There is a tendency for the tires to want to slide out from under the bike on bad roads.



I would not use the center stand or the side stand. These cannot absorb any shocks and can either bend the stands, or bend the frame. As to leaving it in gear, I probably wouldn't. You don't want the transmission or clutch to be constantly under back and forth pressure. Try to tie the front wheel to the front of the trailer and you shouldn't need to have it in gear. Check the tautness of the tiedowns at gas stops and after the first 20 miles or so. They will tend to stretch a bit at first.
 

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Regardless of pressure theories, I recommend strongly to loosen up the tie-downs when you're parked. Also, let off any air pressure you've pumped into the forks. I've transported way too many motorcycle over the years that have blown out the fork seals while having the front end compressed due to tight tie-downs. Minimize the time under pressure.
 

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Although you only fill the forks to a low figure , the pressure can nearly treble as the forks compress so dependant upon how hard you tie wrap them down, this will give the end pressure figure. you dont need air on a trailer so I would simply drain the air out so that when compressed the seals are not withstanding much of any pressure at all. when you take it off the other end just re-pressurise and ride
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Although you only fill the forks to a low figure , the pressure can nearly treble as the forks compress so dependant upon how hard you tie wrap them down, this will give the end pressure figure. you dont need air on a trailer so I would simply drain the air out so that when compressed the seals are not withstanding much of any pressure at all. when you take it off the other end just re-pressurise and ride
 
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