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1980 cx500
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Discussion Starter #1
I’m having trouble with the tail lights . I was working on them and could only get the break lights to work . Now nothing is working , I replaced the fuse after it had burnt out with a 10a . I used a test light to check power to the tail lights everything is good on that and I connect the ground wire and says it’s grounded . Really confused can someone help ?
 

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Which bike are you working on?
When you say tail lights are you referring to the brake//tail light in the middle or to the turn signal lights? Note that the rear turn signal lights do not function as running lights.
Were the lights working properly before you started working on them? A little history of how and when the problem first occurred can help with remote diagnosis.
 

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1980 cx500
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18 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Which bike are you working on?
When you say tail lights are you referring to the brake//tail light in the middle or to the turn signal lights? Note that the rear turn signal lights do not function as running lights.
Were the lights working properly before you started working on them? A little history of how and when the problem first occurred can help with remote diagnosis.
It’s a 1980 cx500 and everything isn’t working no break lights no turn signals and before I had got the bike nothing worked because they had put the wires in between the seat and the frame so they melted
 

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Yea I replaced the tail lights to leds brand new after the fuse had blown
Did you use LED bulbs in the stock Honda lamp sockets or have you replaced the entire units?
 

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Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are simply diodes that produce light when current flows through them. A diode is a device that only allows current to flow through it in one direction and blocks the flow of current in the other direction so if you managed to connect an LED light assembly with the wires that are supposed to go to positive and negative backwards no current will flow through it.

Re ground: You should never use the frame of the bike as ground (return current path) connection for anything. Chassis ground connections are notoriously unreliable. Honda's engineers knew that when these bikes were designed and included green wires in the harness for the ground connection.

Please post a link to the lights you are using or images of any wiring information that came with them so that we can figure out which of the lights' wires should be connected to which of the bike's wires.

BTW: Welcome to the forum. Please add your location to your profile and your bike's model and model year to your signature so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature).

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old and the Previous Owners may or may not have done the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet). If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid). And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).
 

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Registered
1980 cx500
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18 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are simply diodes that produce light when current flows through them. A diode is a device that only allows current to flow through it in one direction and blocks the flow of current in the other direction so if you managed to connect an LED light assembly with the wires that are supposed to go to positive and negative backwards no current will flow through it.

Re ground: You should never use the frame of the bike as ground (return current path) connection for anything. Chassis ground connections are notoriously unreliable. Honda's engineers knew that when these bikes were designed and included green wires in the harness for the ground connection.

Please post a link to the lights you are using or images of any wiring information that came with them so that we can figure out which of the lights' wires should be connected to which of the bike's wires.

BTW: Welcome to the forum. Please add your location to your profile and your bike's model and model year to your signature so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature).

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old and the Previous Owners may or may not have done the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet). If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid). And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).
Ok thanks I updated my profile and these are the tail lights I’m working with ANKIA 40-LED 40W Motorcycle Tail Light Integrated Running Lamp Brake&Turn Signal Light with License Plate Bracket for Harly Motorcycle Street Bike Cruiser Chopper (Black) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B073TYTRPG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_25GA56T0NKX23KGF1Q09
 

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Re ground: You should never use the frame of the bike as ground (return current path) connection for anything. Chassis ground connections are notoriously unreliable. Honda's engineers knew that when these bikes were designed and included green wires in the harness for the ground connection.
Except that the stock rear indicators ground to their mounting posts.
 

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Ok thanks I updated my profile and these are the tail lights I’m working with ANKIA 40-LED 40W Motorcycle Tail Light Integrated Running Lamp Brake&Turn Signal Light with License Plate Bracket for Harly Motorcycle Street Bike Cruiser Chopper (Black) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B073TYTRPG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_25GA56T0NKX23KGF1Q09
The black wire needs to connect to a green wire in the bike's harness. Or, at a minimum, to a ring terminal under a fastener with contact to CLEAN, BARE metal.
 

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The signals that are grounded to the stalks are supposed to have a wire that plugs into the ground wire and has a ring lug on the other end that goes under the nut that attaches the stalk to the bike.

As Randall said, the black wire on your tail light needs to connect to the bike's green wire.
light bike
black green (ground/common)
yellow brown (tail light)
red green/yellow (brake light)
orange light blue (right signal)
blue orange (left signal)
 

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Registered
1980 cx500
Joined
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18 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are simply diodes that produce light when current flows through them. A diode is a device that only allows current to flow through it in one direction and blocks the flow of current in the other direction so if you managed to connect an LED light assembly with the wires that are supposed to go to positive and negative backwards no current will flow through it.

Re ground: You should never use the frame of the bike as ground (return current path) connection for anything. Chassis ground connections are notoriously unreliable. Honda's engineers knew that when these bikes were designed and included green wires in the harness for the ground connection.

Please post a link to the lights you are using or images of any wiring information that came with them so that we can figure out which of the lights' wires should be connected to which of the bike's wires.

BTW: Welcome to the forum. Please add your location to your profile and your bike's model and model year to your signature so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature).

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old and the Previous Owners may or may not have done the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet). If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid). And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).
Ok thanks I updated my profile and
The black wire needs to connect to a green wire in the bike's harness. Or, at a minimum, to a ring terminal under a fastener with contact to CLEAN, BARE metal.
thanks so much I think this might be my problem . Sounds like it might work I’ll give you an update when I get home around 3pm PST
 
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