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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anybody tell me the proper procedure for adjusting the steering head bearing torque? I'm 300 miles from home in Ohio, with the manual on a thumb drive, but no computer handy. It's rideable, but have a low speed speed-wobble that I think is either the head bearings loose or a tire issue.
 

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Looking at the factory manual, it says to torque the steering stem nut to 65-87 ft-lbs; then torque the steering stem fixing bolt to 13-18 ft-lbs. You do this with the fork tubes installed to keep the upper and lower trees lined up.



Incidentally, the troubleshooting section of the chapter says for a wobbly front wheel to check for: 1. distorted rim; 2. worn front wheel bearing; 3. distorted spokes; 4. faulty tire; and 5. axle not tightened properly.



Hope this helps! Good luck!
 

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The threaded adjuster is set prior to torquing things down.



From the shop manual:



"Install the adjuster in the frame neck and tighten it until snug against the top cone race. Then, back it out 1/8 turn.



Make sure that there is no vertical movement and the stem rotates freely."
 

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Funny, I went on a trip and had a problem about 300 miles from OH too




I found when my bearings were loose, you could feel the forks jiggle on bumps. Very unnerving on the mountain roads.



What I did was take a set of chennel locks and a screwdriver,and snugged up the adjuster. Had someone hold the back wheel down, pulled on the forks and they were tight.



Put the top of the tripl;e trees back on, snuged up wit thr channel locks, and off I went.



Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, after over 1000 I made it home. Here's my symptoms before I continue on. I only does it about 50% of the time, only under 30-35, sometimes turning, sometimes straight. I know the axle is straight and torqued right as I just worked on the rotors. I had somebody hold the rear tire down, and found no play in the fork bearingss when pulling up and down. I know one rotor is warped, but I don't see how that could cause it. What do you guys think?
 

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Check the swingarm bearings. I replaced mine when I had the arm powder coated. They were loose and on inspection very worn. After the fix the wobble went away and an interesting drive whine that I couldn't pinpoint went away as well.

IP
 

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I would think stearing bearings would give the wobble all the time although if you hit a bump it may start a wobble. One thing to check that stumpped me at first on the turbo was that although with the front wheel off the ground I could feel no play in the stearing bearings they were indeed shot. With the front wheel off the ground slowly rotate the bars back and forth,if you feel a slight detent as they pass centre there is wear in the bearings at that point and was causing a nasty wobble in the front end.
 

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A tyre, in effect is a digital device with three switches, it only has these states, cold/hot, New/worn, Laden, Unladen. In any case any effect is always present, just at differing levels of force or amplitude. As your problem only manifests itself in certain situations, I would suspect the mechanical truth of the front end. However, until you eradicate your known fault ( warped rotor), you won't realy be able to properly identify any other fault. a single warped rotor will cause pull to one side and will be felt more at lower speed when the contact time through the pads is longer in duration, so I would start there first. If the steering head bearings are worn or loose this can be felt under braking as the entire fork will rock in the head, and sometimes even make an audible click. If the steering checks out ok ( use a spring balance if you can to pull the bars across dead ahead, any variation in the pull force indicates a bearing problem)then you are down to wheel and/or swing arm bearings,or brake caliper and brake plate returns. Sticky pins or gummed up pistons can also cause these "slow reaction" type low level steering faults
 

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The threaded adjuster is set prior to torquing things down.



From the shop manual:



"Install the adjuster in the frame neck and tighten it until snug against the top cone race. Then, back it out 1/8 turn.



Make sure that there is no vertical movement and the stem rotates freely."


Have tapered roller bearings & races coming to replace original steering head ball bearings.



Is the tighten procedure the same for tapered roller bearings as it is for the original ball bearings?



Thanks,
 
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