Honda CX 500 Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the old engine that came out of my bike last year when the main bearings melted down. The engine has 46,667 miles on it. I kept the parts and still have the stator. My "new" engine has 31,000 miles on it. I figure I will need a new stator at some point.



Should I take the good one I have now and get it rewound? Or should I trust that when the time comes to put it in my bike it will be ok? I don't want to end up putting one in and have it go out in a matter of months. Would it be a good idea to go ahead and have it fixed and ready to be replaced for when the time comes? How much does it cost to get one rewound?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,423 Posts
I'd just use it if required.No one can tell you how long it could last.It could last for another 100,000 miles,it could go tomorrow.



Note:Under,"Sod's Law" if you got it rewound your main one would most likely go<grin>
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,399 Posts
Shep told me that a couple years ago and my old one is still working just fine.




Mine is finally failing. Not 100% but more like only making 70 watts out of 170. Last year when I dropped the engine to do the cam chain it still looked fine but I wasn't constantly using a voltage light to read it.



I'm replacing mine tonight if not tomorrow because the bike deserves it. G8 stators can be had for a little over $100 USD and it will save you from having to buy another gasket and possibly mechanical seal when that one dies.



With that said I bet I could still get another year out of this stator if not only a few days. Electrical parts are always questionable. It could go tomorrow or last the rest of the life of the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
Mine is finally failing. Not 100% but more like only making 70 watts out of 170. Last year when I dropped the engine to do the cam chain it still looked fine but I wasn't constantly using a voltage light to read it.



I'm replacing mine tonight if not tomorrow because the bike deserves it. G8 stators can be had for a little over $100 USD and it will save you from having to buy another gasket and possibly mechanical seal when that one dies.



With that said I bet I could still get another year out of this stator if not only a few days. Electrical parts are always questionable. It could go tomorrow or last the rest of the life of the bike.


That sure is a rock solid argument BS. I suppose if mine were to fail this summer I'd think about why I didn't do it before... Right now I don't think I will ever have pull my engine again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,269 Posts
I´ve replaced a fair amount of "CDI-type" stators. Mostly on bikes belonging to other CX-owners, but also on four of my CX-engines. On mine it was mostly as a precaution - only one stator was really shot. Doing it "in advance" may very well be overkill, though.



As has been said many times before - the high speed source coil is the weak spot on these stators.



46667 miles is just where the "fun" begins (in average, statistically). "Fun" translates best to "stator problems". 60 - 80000 kms in decimal form.

But - many stators run into and well over 100000 miles (160000 kms). Mostly you can´t tell, in advance.



Of course, if the stator looks "fried" (resin coating black-ish and crusted) you may expect that it won´t live too long.



If I were you I would leave things as they are. Happily potter around with what you have inside that engine now. If problems occur - address them then and use the other stator, if it measures OK and looks healthy to the eye.



Suggesting that an engine drop doesn´t give you any major problems.



I´ve had stators rewound in the UK for the equivalent of ~ $ 150. Shouldn´t cost more over there.



Then there also is the Ignitech route. Seems to work very well.



Sture
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
All this about "stator" leads me to ask a question.



I had the cover plate off a friends '80 CX500C and behind it found a loose aluminum plate/washer with the hole lineing up with the center armature shaft. No bolt to hold it their. I found a bolt in my misc. bolts that bolted into the end of the shaft and it bottomed just before binding the "floating" washer/plate. I don't have any idea why this was in their or did it have a reason to be at any point - any ideas??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,282 Posts
Are you saying that the washer appears to fit in the end of the flywheel, but there isn't a bolt holding the flywheel onto the crankshaft? I can't imagine that happening for any length of time without the flywheel becoming loose.



Can you post a picture of the offending washer? Or at least give us a size reference?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Well it's at the other end of the shaft toward the back of the bike. This item is like a very large aluminum sasher that nearly covers the stator area inside. I should have taken pictures when I had the plate off it would be much easier to get an idea of what I'm saying, sorry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,601 Posts
I wouldn't bother spending the money. Wait until you lose the one that's in there and replace it with the other used one.



In theory given no overheating, maintaining a proper oil level, not drawing a ton of current due to accessories or even having to try to maintain a charge on a weak battery - a stator could last for ages.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Is the stator on the back end of the crank or camshaft? Which ever, this washer/shield is about 3.5 inches across or just short of the area of the stator, made of about 1/16" of aluminum with about 1/2" hole in the center where I placed the flange bolt to secure it. With nothing to go by and the stator shaft threaded down the center I figured it was for some sort of securing bolt thus my actions. After getting the back plate bolted back on, I was a bit concerned that I might cause some kind of short when starting it but if it was just loose in their to begin with what difference would it make - only better I though. It runs no different, and has for over a month. Does your stator have such a washer/shield attached to the outside end of the center shaft?



Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,563 Posts
Is the stator on the back end of the crank or camshaft? Which ever, this washer/shield is about 3.5 inches across or just short of the area of the stator, made of about 1/16" of aluminum with about 1/2" hole in the center where I placed the flange bolt to secure it. With nothing to go by and the stator shaft threaded down the center I figured it was for some sort of securing bolt thus my actions. After getting the back plate bolted back on, I was a bit concerned that I might cause some kind of short when starting it but if it was just loose in their to begin with what difference would it make - only better I though. It runs no different, and has for over a month. Does your stator have such a washer/shield attached to the outside end of the center shaft?



Bill
does this help Bill



 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top