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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I recently bought my first 1978 cx500 and bought it as a half done project. Previous owner had stated the stator was replaced and had also given me an uninstalled ignitech cdi. I started looking more at the bike itself and while there is evidence that the stator case was opened something seemed to be missing. That missing bit is a plug with blue and whit wires. So now my questions are: was it possibly upgraded? How can I tell if it was upgraded? Did the previous owner do a shotty job or install the wrong stator? Any help is much appreciated.
 

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The PO either left the original stator or changed it to a G8 stator which does not have the blue white wires. Since he was planning an Ignitech installation the blue and white wires are redundant and may have been cut off from the stock G47 stator.

The blue and white wires supply high voltage to the CDI. The Ignitech replaces the stock CDI with one powered from the bikes 12 volt system. One downside is if your battery is dead you can not bump start the bike.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The PO either left the original stator or changed it to a G8 stator which does not have the blue white wires. Since he was planning an Ignitech installation the blue and white wires are redundant and may have been cut off from the stock G47 stator.

The blue and white wires supply high voltage to the CDI. The Ignitech replaces the stock CDI with one powered from the bikes 12 volt system. One downside is if your battery is dead you can not bump start the bike.
So, basically if I understand it correctly, that plug is unnecessary with ignitech, it would only make it capable of bump starting?
 

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No, not quite. It would only bump start if the G47 stator, pickups and advancers were all functional. With an Ignitech it would only bump start if there was enough reserve power in the battery.
 
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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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No, not quite. It would only bump start if the G47 stator, pickups and advancers were all functional.
AND you had the original CDI installed.

The original Capacitor Discharge Ignition was powered by special windings on the alternator stator so that it could run with a dead battery once you got it started (this is where "bump" or push starting comes in). Unfortunately failing CDI units and CDI stators have been pretty common for a long time and becoming more common as they age.

Because the CDI related windings take up space on the stator (commonly referred to as "G47" type) there is only room left for enough charging windings to produce 150W. The stator used in models with Transistor amplifier Ignition (TI) such as the GL500, CX/GL650 and '82 CX500C (commonly referred to as "G8 type) has the same footprint but since it is all charging windings its output is rated at 252W.
As Mike said, the Ignitech is powered by the bike's battery/charging/lighting system so it doesn't need the special windings so a lot of people upgrade to the G8 type when they replace the CDI with something more modern (Ignitech or Rae-San).

BTW: Welcome to the forum. Please add your location and your bike's model and model year to your profile so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget (see Forum Settings link in my signature).

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is over 4 decades old and the Previous Owners may or may not have done the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet). If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid). And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).
 
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