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what is the average stator life in a cx500/cx650? in a turbo, its <20000miles. wondering what the number is on a NA engine.
 

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The non-CDI stators lasted a lot longer than that. I've heard of these engines in places where they aren't stored for long periods (which means the camchain lasts longer) not needing to be taken apart for over 100,000 miles...
 

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I'm a little confused. What deteriorates a stator? Mileage or time? Or, which is more important? Someone told me it was heat.
 

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I've heard all sorts of theories about not being immersed in the oil like the stators on some bikes are decreasing the lifespan and stuff like that but the GL1000/1100/1200 engine has a very similar stator (slightly heavier wire) and even farther from the oil and they have been known to last a very long time.
Personally, I think there are 2 factors that contribute to premature failure of the charging stator (I'm not talking about the extra coils for the CDI). The first one is battery condition. If the stator is trying to charge a battery that has a dead cell or something else that causes it to draw more current than normal for extended periods the heat generated by the current flowing in the windings (which is much higher than the temperature of the engine) can deteriorate the insulation and allow turns of the winding to short to each other, which causes even more current to flow, increasing the temperature and so on until a bit of the wire melts and no current flows. The second is vibration. Every turn in every winding is in close contact with other turns and the whole thing is inside a vibrating engine. If there is even the tiniest space between them they can move and rub against each other until the insulation wears through.

And there are always a few cases where an excessive amount of electrical accessories are added that simply overload the charging system. On GoldWings it used to be mostly light bulbs (some of the big rallies actually have lightshow competitions but the bikes entered these days usually nave dedicated wiring and power sources for that these days) but LEDs and common sense have changed that.
But think about this: The alternators on the TI CX/GL bikes are rated st 252W and they can't produce that below about 2500 RPM. With just the original electrical equipment you need maybe 50W for your ignition, your original headlight draws 55W on low and the original instrument lights, tail lights, marker lights &c add up to over 30W. Now add a high wattage stereo, a pair of 55W halogen driving lights (less of a problem these days with LEDs) and some electrically heated clothing and maybe handlebar heaters and you can see how easy it can be to add up to more than there is available...
 

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Stator failure wouldn't be such a big issue, of course, if it didn't require an engine out operation to replace it!
 

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There is only so much space on the ends of the camshaft and crankshaft and if you want shaft drive without putting the engine in sideways and needing a a power sapping bevel drive between the engine and driveshaft the only places easy to access are at the front. Considering that the life expectancy was under a decade I think having to remove the engine to replace the stator every decade or so isn't too big a design flaw. At least you can get at the oil filter (that you need access to a lot more often).....
 

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Heat, mostly, and contaminants in the oil. Both attack the insulation on the coil wires.

Randall
My GL500 only has 7,800 miles on it. When I did the first oil change, what was in there look like new oil. David put a new stator on the GL650. It has 28,000 on it.
I wasn't used to how the GL650 started when warm. You get one crank, hesitation, then it fires off. I got a new battery, and it does the same but starts like the GL500 when cold. So I am thinking of putting the first battery back on, keep the second as a spare. I think maybe the AGMs store better? David mentioned that he likes to change batteries on the GL650s every two years. The GL650 is everything I hoped for and I want to get the GL500 in the same mechanical shape.(mostly changing gaskets and rubber seals.) Thanks David!
 

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If you don't look after a battery you will probably have to replace it every couple of years but a normal flooded cell lead acid bike battery should last at least 5-6 years with proper maintenance Battery Maintenance/How Batteries Work

My experience with an AGM battery is that the one I bought for my GoldWing did not survive 18 months of disuse stored in a place that is always above freezing and connected to a solar maintainer. (In my case it turned out that the problem was in the carbs so I ended up sharing the lead acid battery that I had replaced between the bike and the riding mower for a year and then converting the bike to accept the same U1 size battery as Eccles so I can leave the other one in the mower.)

I wouldn't try to store any lead acid battery (be it flooded cell or AGM) that has been charged with the intention of using it in a few years. You would be better off to sell one of them to someone in your area and buy a new one when the time comes.

BTW: I suspect that the difference in starting between the way the 500 and the 650 may be because the 650's ignition timing is a couple of degrees different. Perhaps someone else who has both will comment further...
 

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I wouldn't try to store any lead acid battery (be it flooded cell or AGM) that has been charged with the intention of using it in a few years. You would be better off to sell one of them to someone in your area and buy a new one when the time comes.
Thanks Bob!
Maybe I need another bike to put the battery in! (Don't tell my wife!)
I am also making a solar powered kiosk to go on a bicycle trailer. The spare battery might be useful for that. Thinking cap on!

BTW: I suspect that the difference in starting between the way the 500 and the 650 may be because the 650's ignition timing is a couple of degrees different. Perhaps someone else who has both will comment further...
Thanks again. There are several tiny differences that only make it interesting. One time, after a ride, I turned the GL650 back on, trying to lock the handle bars and I heard a whirling sound. At first I wondered if the started got stuck, then I remembered the electric fan. The engine sounds are slightly different too.
 

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Knock on wood , "Silvy" has 150,000 km on her engine with a OEM stator , bike is always on a battery tender ,even in riding season. Been said here before some where to never ride the bikes with a discharged battery. A healthy discharged battery can absorb way more current then the Stator was designed to output. Remember the regulator only controls voltage not amperage. To be honest have changed all lights to leds so can drive the Stereo and heated grips ,so 50,000 kms in four years with no charging problems.
Just remembered did get rid of the connector between the Stator and rec/reg and replaced with Soldered butt connectors and heat shrink wrapped,rains alot on the wet coast of British Columbia.

Moral of my posting Charge your battery before Riding!!! Many Happy Miles to you all Gerard
 
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