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Nope. They are the old rubber standard lines. I wouldn't put them on any bike of mine.
 

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Nope. They are the old rubber standard lines. I wouldn't put them on any bike of mine.
thanks mate,iv been grinding all morning,this place is full of crap in the air
 

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Does anyone have experience with ABB brake lines?They are in Dania Florida,nearby,but do not sell over the counter.Thanks,Mike
 

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thanks mate,iv been grinding all morning,this place is full of crap in the air


Man, I'm glad I read this in context..........
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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Nope. They are the old rubber standard lines. I wouldn't put them on any bike of mine.
I heartily agree.



Rubber brake lines are only designed to last for 2-3 fluid changes (5-6 years). They deteriorate due to ozone in the air, ultra violet from sunlight, and contact with brake fluid.



Have you ever wondered why brake fluid turns red/brown after a couple of years? it's a combination of oxydization caused by the moisture that finds it's way through the porous rubber and rubber particles suspended in the fluid. I think it is obvious that this reduces the incompressability of the fluid, and thus impairs the function of the brake. Not to mention what can happen if the water boils because the caliper gets hot.



If you wrap one hand around a rubber line and squeeze the lever with the other you will feel the tubing expand. This is fluid moved by the master cylinder that doesn't contribute to the movement of the caliper piston(s). In other words: lost braking power.

If you wrap your hand around a braided ss line and apply the brake you will feel the line stiffen, but it will not expand.



Stainless steel braided brake lines are NOT made with rubber. They are made by braiding stainless steel wire over a teflon tube. The process is almost identical to the rope braiding machines I operate at work.



Teflon is NOT porous. It will not allow any contaminants into the fluid.

The braided wire covering protects the teflon tube from damage and also increases the stiffness of the already dimensionally stable tube.

They use stainless steel because it does not corrode.

See www.goodridge.net



A few years ago I sold my '78 GS400. When I took it out of the shed after sitting for about 8-9 years, the fluid was barely darker than new and the brake worked perfectly. It had a braided SS line.

(NOTE: I would recommend replacing the fluid before using it on the road after that long, even with a braided ss line.)

My GoldWing sat about the same length of time before I got it and the fluid had actually crystalized in the rubber lines.



One more thing - longevity & price:



With rubber lines you need to change the fluid every couple of years. Rubber lines should be replaced about every 2-3 fluid changes (every 5-6 years).



Stainless braided lines should last forever unless mechanically damaged and I have no problem leaving the fluid in them for 4-5 years. It would probably be OK to leave it longer.

See this link: http://www.tirerack.com/brakes/goodridge/warranty.jsp



Stainless lines are usually cheaper than than original rubber ones too.
 

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http://www.jdaent.com/



Solid teflon, finest braided wire you ever saw embedded in the lines. Aircraft quality fittings.



If Craig doesn't already have your pattern on file all he'll need is a few pix.
 
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