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It is supposed to be sandwiched between the fender and the fork leg so that the end that sticks out deflects rain water away from the caliper and the part that is bent around can keep the brake line from flopping around. There should be something similar on the other side. A lot of people leave them out without appreciable problems.

If you look carefully you can see one peeking out from behind the fork in each of these pics
https://www.cx500forum.com/attachments/20915175_10214207161238490_3180881104301617417_n-jpg.189909/

https://www.cx500forum.com/attachments/81gl-after-jpg.189709/
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Ahh, thanks. That's exactly what I needed. I'll put it back on.

Sidecar Bob. It's so funny that you chose the second picture. That is the picture I took of my first GL500 after I stripped it from an Interstate model (I had a different user name on this forum back then). I really miss that bike. Also, the Crown Vic in that picture (the green car) was one of the best cars I've ever owned. Oh well, nothing lasts forever, and we just move on.

Thanks for the help all.

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Actually, I found both of those pics by searching your posts for pics you had posted. I figured that way there was a better chance of showing where it came from on your own bike.
Man, I really need to start sleeping at night :)
 
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It is supposed to be sandwiched between the fender and the fork leg so that the end that sticks out deflects rain water away from the caliper and the part that is bent around can keep the brake line from flopping around. There should be something similar on the other side. A lot of people leave them out without appreciable problems.

If you look carefully you can see one peeking out from behind the fork in each of these pics
https://www.cx500forum.com/attachments/20915175_10214207161238490_3180881104301617417_n-jpg.189909/

https://www.cx500forum.com/attachments/81gl-after-jpg.189709/
I really like the gray GL
 

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Discussion Starter #50
Well, I couldn't wait for the new tires. I went out for a ride on the Vulcan, and turned around and came home. I insured the bike today, so why not ride it? I put the Vulcan away, turned the key on the Silverwing, and without using the choke, quickly pressed the starter button, and she came to life. Because I have old tires on it, I just kept it in the neighborhood. But, the brakes and suspension are great. I am still not sure about the clutch though. I feel like it isn't fully engaging. I mean, it doesn't feel like it's riding the clutch at all when fully released, but I feel like it's not 100% grabbing either. That could be because I am so used to my other bike. I mean, I felt cramped on the Silverwing too, and felt like the pegs got in my way, but I am used to a more stretched out sit and floorboards, so I know that part is just me. I mean, the bike does get up to speed quite quickly. I mean, fast! It would totally beat my Vulcan 1700 in a race, especially off the line. So, again, maybe it's just me.

If anyone was is around the Kenosha area to set me straight on this, I'd be happy to let you give my bike a spin.

But, The couple of miles I put on my bike were nice. I forgot how quiet the thing is. I thought my Vulcan was quiet, but the GL500 is almost stealth compared to it. I think my Durango might be louder than the bike.

Anyhow, thanks for following along. This bike was fun. I'm not quite done with it yet, but this thread was about getting the Silverwing back on the road, and it was officially back on the road as of today.

Dan
 
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If your clutch is starting to go slippage will be most noticed in the higher gears, under load. For example accelerating while climbing a hill.
 

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Discussion Starter #52
Got me some new tires in the mail today. Made an appointment at the shop to bring the wheels in. I want to adjust the rear brakes anyhow and moly up the rear end, so I don't mind taking the wheels off myself. Besides, I save $100 in labor that way.
201346
 

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Discussion Starter #54
I've thought of that, but don't have a balancer. By the time I bought that, I would have paid for it to be done. But, I've gone through enough motorcycle tires that it would have paid for itself many times over. Hmm, something to think about.

Dan
 

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I've been mounting my own tires for 35 years without a balancer. I used to set the wheel & tire on a shaft on a couple of boxes and spin them (mark the place that stops at the bottom and if the same place always stops at the bottom add weight on the opposite side and spin again until it stops with random places down) but I found that if I mounted the tire with the dot/mark next to the valve they never needed weight so I haven't even checked for about 20 years.

What is really worth having is a bead breaker and some real bead lube (NOT WD40, Armorall or dish detergent). A 16 oz bottle of something like Tire Slick is enough for about a dozen tires (removing and installing). It not only makes the job easier but it won't cause the tire to slip on the rim like oily stuff will or contribute to corrosion like detergent.

You can buy bead breakers but here's what I use. The lever (part of an old bed frame) is bolted through a doorframe in the shop. I sit the wheel on a couple of pieces of wood to keep the hub off the floor. The ram is a piece of 2x4 with one end tapered to concentrate the pressure and the other notched for the lever (there is a screw in the arm that keeps the ram from moving).
201365
 

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I've thought of that, but don't have a balancer. By the time I bought that, I would have paid for it to be done. But, I've gone through enough motorcycle tires that it would have paid for itself many times over. Hmm, something to think about.

Dan
Balancing beads are the way to go. Works better than a balancer because you never have to rebalance the tire its entire life.
 

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Some people swear by balancing beads but I've never felt the need to spend money on them. As I said, if you put the mark on the tire next to the valve stem the balance is usually pretty close.
 

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I pre-balance the bare rim. The lightest spot isn't always at the stem whole. Never needed a weight.

Randall
 

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I agree you probably are fine without balancing but I absolutely can’t stand wheel vibrations and shimmies and will not take a chance on having one. Balancing beads are dirt cheap on ebay and figure since I’m already going through the work of changing the tires myself, it’s almost no energy spent dumping some beads in the tire while in the process.
 
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