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Discussion Starter #21
If memory serves me correctly, I do believe the naked GL1100 used the same front signals as the Naked GL500.

Would you care to sell the mirrors and the windshield that are currently on the fairing? -Graves-
Hey there 65GTC, I sent you a PM on the windshield and mirrors. I've stripped down the fairing, so let me know if you are still interested in those parts and I'll get them sent over to you.

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #22
There are a few more items that needed my attention. The brakes, while they do stop the bike, just never felt right to me. The fluid reservoir was on its last legs, so I figured I may as well start with replacing that. They seemed weak. Also, the clutch was all wrong. The clutch wouldn't grab until almost fully released, and even then, it never felt like it was fully intact. I think this is why the bike felt way more under powered than I remember it. Also, the fuel line and one vacuum hose was starting to crack, so may as well replace it. Also, the kickstand seemed wrong. The bike leaned on it way more than I remember. The metal would make contact with the ground, and would scrape as the bikes weight was added to it. I remembered that there should have been a hard rubber stop, or whatever you call it, and when I looked, it was worn down to a nub.

I messed with the clutch cable a bit, and I was able to adjust it enough. It felt good, the clutch was engaging and I had the power from the bike that I remembered and loved. However, I maxed it out as best as I could. The cable has definitely seen better days.

So, onto ordering...

One new clutch cable
One new brake reservoir
One new rubber kick stand insert
fuel line and filter
Vacuum hose

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Today, after acquiring the parts from my list, I decided to go ahead and get some work done on the bike.

First stop was the kickstand. Look at how worn out this guy was:
KS1.jpg

I pried the old one out and just had to compare it to the new one. Shees
KS02.jpg

Greased the new one up a bit, slid it in and bolted it. Done.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Next was the fuel line. I decided to add an in-line filter. The tank is spotless inside, but this is $6 insurance. I had it on the old bike, so why not the new one.
Fuel.jpg

I replaced the vacuum hose from the carb to the petcock. That one was barely holding on, so may as well replace it. No picture, but you all know what a what a vacuum hose looks like.

Then the brakes. Actually, I'm going to start another thread in Technical, but what a mess....

I removed the old, bad reservoir. It was in pretty bad shape, bulging and I was able to dent in the plastic with a fingernail. So that HAD to go.
Brakes01.jpg

I removed the reservoir, and had a pool of brown crud.
Brakes02.jpg

I took the master cylinder off of the bike and scraped all the hard crud out. I then ran it through my sonic cleaner using a vinegar/water/salt mix. I'm going to pick up some simple green tomorrow and see if I can get it any cleaner, but my mixture did get most of the crud out.
Brakes03.jpg

So, I think I'm going to need a lot more work to the brakes. I'll open a new post in tech for help on this, so more to follow.

I didn't even bother with the clutch cable yet. I'll address this after the brakes.

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I had some time to work on the bike this weekend. I removed the brake caliper, tore it apart and cleaned it up. I didn't take a picture of it, but the same crud that was in the master cylinder was also in the calipers. Definitely the issue with the soft brakes. The pins in the caliper were hard to drive out, but I was able to do it with some not-so-gentle persuasion. The pistons came out fairly easily. They were in good condition, but since I already purchased the rebuild kit, I'm just going to go on ahead and use all new parts.

Anyhow, I cleaned the parts up with Simple Green and my ultrasonic cleaner.
BrakeParts01r.jpg

The caliper came out nicely,
Caliper01r.jpg

but the master cylinder won't get much cleaner.
MC01r.jpg

And, on top of that, I can't get the old piston out to rebuild it. The retaining clip was a beast to try to get out. I was not able to compress it at all, and when I was able to get one side of it up, it broke, so I just simply can't get it apart. I am going to keep tying, but it may be toast. I want the original MC on the bike, so I guess I'll be hitting up eBay for another one that I can rebuild.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Noted. To the naked eye, they looked just stained, but you're right, the image does show more crud there. I blame my glasses :) I'm a year over due for an exam, and I've already noticed the glasses aint working like they used to.

I'll get a lighted magnifier to clean them out better.

Dan
 

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i followed up the ultrasonic using a dremel tool and small wire wheel. I used a steel wheel but perhaps a brass one would be better due to possible damage to the aluminum.
IMG_6189.JPG

Regarding rotary tool wire wheels, the cheap ones will fall apart if much pressure is applied. When that happened I could feel the small bristles hitting me in the face. They flew all over and stuck in the shirt I was wearing.
 

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Stainless brushes are more aggressive but brass ones wear out faster. I buy them cheap on eBay in lots of 10 (& in several shapes) so I always have some on hand when I need them. I don't have a problem with them coming apart like that (maybe you have the speed too high?) but I always wear safety glasses just in case.
 

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Stainless brushes are more aggressive but brass ones wear out faster. I buy them cheap on eBay in lots of 10 (& in several shapes) so I always have some on hand when I need them. I don't have a problem with them coming apart like that (maybe you have the speed too high?) but I always wear safety glasses just in case.
My experience has been similar to the users of these:
https://www.amazon.com/Drill-Warehouse-Wire-Brushes-Accessories/dp/B073YFD5HN/ref=asc_df_B073YFD5HN/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=242034450866&hvpos=1o4&hvnetw=g&hvrand=4332086803563293581&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9022724&hvtargid=pla-446656769279&psc=1#customerReviews
I think I paid just under $10 for 36 pieces off ebay. If I'm not mistaken, a pair of Dremel SS wire wheels goes for $5.00 of so. I think the cheaper ones I have have there uses, just can't lean into them, even at the lowest speed. Those bristles probably won't pierce skin, but could damage an eye IMO so wearing safety glasses is definitely a good idea. All three I have used so far have eventually come apart, rather quickly, too.
 

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Wire Wheel Follow Up

I took a channel lock pliers and pinched the inside of the wheel and use a needle nose to pinch the cone-shaped ones. Used both type wheels to clean up the thermostat housing, coolant pipes etc before replacing o-rings. They both held up without loosing a bristle. Before pinching I doubt either wold have made it through with more than a few if any remaining:
IMG_6206a.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Thanks for the advice of the brass wire wheel. I had a few of them laying around my shop, so I chucked one up to my dremmel and started cleaning up the channels with a dental pick and the brass wheel. And, yeah, there was a lot of dried up crud in there. I cleaned it all up down to bare aluminum, and started rebuilding. Placed the O-rings in, and used the supplied red grease that I got in my rebuild kit from Brake Crafters, and the pistons popped in quite nicely. Cleaned up the pins, and reassembled the caliper, complete with new pads.
Caliper-r-r.jpg

Then onto the master cylinder. As I mentioned previously, the retaining clip had broken on one side. I didn't get pictures of my rig, but used a 6-inch clamp and a bolt to compress the piston down to the groove. Then, with an ice pick, my thinnest needle-nose pliers and a long, but thin flat-head screwdriver, I was able to finally get the clip out. Whew! I thought for sure that thing was a goner.

I'm glad I decided to rebuild it too. The parts were pretty cruddy.
OldParts-r.jpg

So, put the master cylinder back in the sonic cleaner, ran it through a couple of rounds of cleaning, and put all the new parts in. Again, using Brake Crafters parts. Not the prettiest master cylinder, but the bike isn't, nor will it be showroom quality.
MC-r-r.jpg

The next steps are putting it all back together now, making sure to bleed the brakes, of course, and install the new clutch cable.

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I finally had some time to work on the bike some more. I've been rather busy lately, so I haven't been able to give the bike any attention. But, I had almost the entire afternoon to myself, so out to the garage I went.

I went ahead and installed the caliper, MC and new brake line. That went really easy. Heck, even bleeding the brakes went well. I looked around the site as I saw a lot of folks mentioning how hard it was to bleed the brakes and how they would have to do it multiple times to get it done. One process that I saw was to bleed the brakes from the bottom, up. Basically, disconnect the brake line from the MC, and from the bleed nipple on the caliper, force the brake fluid in until it comes out of the top of the brake line. Then, bench bleed the MC. Bolt the brake line to the MC, tape the brake lever to open the MC, and force more fluid int he caliper until I stop seeing the air bubbles in the fluid reservoir. So, I did that, and as an addition, after doing all that, use the vacuum bleeder to suck some fluid and remaining air from the caliper. And wouldn't you know it, perfectly working brakes the first time. It took maybe 30-minutes, give or take. But, it was easier than I thought.

FB01_r.jpg

FB02_r.jpg

Also, I removed the chrome grips that were on the bike as they just didn't look right.

I decided to go ahead and winterize the bike and finish it up in the Spring.

All I have left to do is find the new grips I want for the bike, replace the clutch cable and replace the tires. The bike will be safe and ready to ride.

I will continue this thread in the Spring when I unpack the bike from the mothballs and finish her up.

Thanks for staying tuned!

Dan
 
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Discussion Starter #34
Good morning all. The weather is starting to break, the sun has been coming out to warm things up, and I have run out of stuff to fix around the house while on the stay at home order. So, yesterday, I pulled the GL500 out of the garage and started the work back up.

I didn't do to much yesterday. I was just tinkering around as an excuse to get out of the house and enjoy some sun, though it was very windy out. I changed the oil and added a new filter and some nice Shall Rotella oil. The oil I took out looks like it's been in the bike for a few years. But, it's a Honda, so you can put Wesson in the thing and it'll still run. I noticed that I will need a battery though. I kept the bike on a battery tender all winter, but the battery didn't have much juice, so I had to jump the bike to warm it up to drain the oil. I had a feeling that was going to be the case, so I'll need to order one of tho
200055
se. I also added new foam grips to the bike. I don't know if I'll keep them, as I'm not too fond of them, but I want to keep the 80's style, so I didn't want to buy any ISO grips or anything that would look out of place on the bike.

Another thing I needed to do was replace the clutch cable. I had ordered one last year, but never swapped it out I went ahead and did that as well.

Old:
200056


New:
200057
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So, now the bike is shifting beautifully. Also, this is the first time I had a chance to test the new brakes after I rebuilt them last year. They feel awesome. I still have no idea how the brakes worked with all that gunk in there last year, but the brakes work so much better now. It's nice to see that fresh, clean fluid in the reservoir, and it's nice that the bike isn't "riding the clutch" on its own, as it had with the old clutch cable.

Also, I started buffing out the paint and cleaning up some of the chrome. Like they say, you can't polish a turd, but I am doing the best I can. The tank has a much nicer shine now, and I didn't get a picture of that since I had already parked it in the garage, but I can snap some more shots of that the next time I play with it.

The bike also needs a new set of tires, but that'll have to wait until this order is lifted and things get somewhat back to normal.

Well, until next time. And, stay safe and healthy out there, all.

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Last week, I replaced the battery on the bike. I knew the battery on the bike was ancient, so I picked one up at Farm and Fleet. Added the acid, charged it up and installed it.

Today, I took the bike out of the garage to adjust the clutch. I thought I was ready to finally insure the bike and make an appointment for my new tires so I can start riding the bike.

Well...

When I sat on the bike, it seemed like there was way too much travel on the front forks. I do not remember this when I test ride the bike last summer. I looked at the forks, and the left one was all oily. So, it looks like I blew a fork seals. Just when I thought the bike was road worthy too.

Oh well, stay tuned.

Dan
 

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Hi
I got all the parts I needed in the for sale section of this forum and at a fraction of the cost of eBay or David Silver.
Regards
Frank
I am thinking about putting the pull handle sissy bar and small rack like yours on my GL650 from my GL500 because I have the big trunk on the GL500. I got a cover for the rear seat of the GL500, so I can cover the bolt holes on that seat if I want to swap it for the trunk.
201090

201091
 

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Discussion Starter #38
It could very well be the original seal installed at the factory. It would be more surprising for a 38 year old rubber part not to fail.....
No doubt. The rubber certainly looks to be original to the bike, so it's not surprising that it's original. I'm going to go ahead and replace the seals on both sides just for some added insurance.

Dan
 

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I would never replace one seal and leave the other unless I knew that they were fairly new. Especially on a bike with forks that require air pressure and have a hose connecting them so that if one seal fails both legs collapse.

You might find this useful:
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Thanks, Bob. You are always very helpful with these bukes, and I highly appreciate your input on all things CX or GL.

Anyhow, today was a nice, cool, Spring day in SE Wisconsin, so I decided to go ahead and work on the forks today. I got my fork seals in the mail on Saturday, and the motorcycle shop reopened, so I was able to get my Spectro fork oil. I was watching some videos online and Bob's write-up, and instead of bolting my 8" vice in the garage, I decided t purchase a portable workstation from Harbor Fright, and so glad I did as the last time I did forks, it was a pain. This workstation made it so much easier: https://www.harborfreight.com/hands-free-portable-workstation-with-1-ton-clamping-force-64827.html

Anyhow, after I got home, I went and started by jacking up the bike and strapping it down so I can yank on stuff without fear of the bike falling.
201239


Then I took the tire off, disconnected the spedo cable and removed the fender
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I went to work, one fork at a time. Here, you can see the portable workstation in action.
201241


And, because I suck at taking progress pictures, I, once again, got into a zone and failed to take any. But, it was pretty easy. Remove the Allen bolt at the bottom of the shock. Drain the oil. Remote the cap, Pull out all the sprints and retainer, yank up on the inner fork to release the seal after removing the retaining clip. Then, reverse it and put it all back together.

And, don't be a moron like me and forget to replace the Allen bolt when you add the oil.

Anyhow, the bike is all back together and the shocks are night and day better. They hold oil and air, and when applying the brake, I don't feel like I'm digging myself off of the pavement :)

So, NOW I can get my Dunlap D404 tires installed and start riding. The bike is running great, starts right up. Clutch and brakes feel great, and now, so does the suspension.

One thing before I close this... I usually don't have leftover parts, but I have this bracket that I can't, for the life of me, remember where it goes. I remember it dropping on the concrete, but I have no idea where it goes. Can anyone here please tell me?
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Thanks all,
Dan
 
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