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Discussion Starter #1
Thanks to everyone in this community! I've benefitted a lot from this forum as I've worked on my bike.

I'm looking to upgrade my speedometer and tachometer for my 79' Custom. I've looked around a bunch but I'm worried about quality and compatibility. Wondering if anyone has successfully installed any particular products that they would be willing to recommend?
 

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Adam312
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i searched like you and found speedo tacho which is reproduction model of the old cb750 cb550 gl1000 and looks like they are interchangeable to stock bracket of cx500c, also cx500 gauges ratio is 1:2 - speedo, 1:4 tacho. This new gauges tacho also is 1:4. but i didn't find what is ratio the speedo.
And they are looks like quality and i didn't find them in aliexpress

 

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I used an Acewell all in one on my GL which I found to be a great product, but leads for tach and speedo are electronic. On my current CX project I used a tach and speedo I purchased off Dime City and temp gauge off eBay. These are mechanical so little easier to install. Worked well when I had the bike in mock up.
199426
199427
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I used an Acewell all in one on my GL which I found to be a great product, but leads for tach and speedo are electronic. On my current CX project I used a tach and speedo I purchased off Dime City and temp gauge off eBay. These are mechanical so little easier to install. Worked well when I had the bike in mock up. View attachment 199426 View attachment 199427
Very nice! How hard is would it be for a novice to convert to electronic? I like that Acewell best. Great suggestions.
 

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The Acewell will require a bit of wiring, although pretty well any new gauge will. For the speedometer, Acewell makes an electronic cable that replaces your factory speedo cable. I would get that as it easily plugs into the wiring harness on the gauge. For the tach function you have to run the sender wire around one of the coil leads on the bike. And also remove and cap the factory tach cable. Aside from that you will need to splice the main wiring harness for the gauge which provides power and all warning lights to the proper wires on the bike. And lastly, the Acewell does not have a temp gauge. But it does have a fuel gauge. And the lead off of the bike temp sensor can be connected to the lead on the gauge for the fuel level sender. This provides a decent temp gauge using the fuel level bars on the gauge. Empty means cold, 1-2 bars means warming up, 3-4 bars means normal running temp, over 4 bars could indicate overheating. Hope this all makes sense :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The Acewell will require a bit of wiring, although pretty well any new gauge will. For the speedometer, Acewell makes an electronic cable that replaces your factory speedo cable. I would get that as it easily plugs into the wiring harness on the gauge. For the tach function you have to run the sender wire around one of the coil leads on the bike. And also remove and cap the factory tach cable. Aside from that you will need to splice the main wiring harness for the gauge which provides power and all warning lights to the proper wires on the bike. And lastly, the Acewell does not have a temp gauge. But it does have a fuel gauge. And the lead off of the bike temp sensor can be connected to the lead on the gauge for the fuel level sender. This provides a decent temp gauge using the fuel level bars on the gauge. Empty means cold, 1-2 bars means warming up, 3-4 bars means normal running temp, over 4 bars could indicate overheating. Hope this all makes sense :)
Very very helpful! Thanks for the rundown!
 

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Most electronic speedos use a magnet mounted on the wheel (usually in the brake disc carrier) and a sensor mounted where the magnet will pass it every time the wheel rotates. This is not terribly difficult to do and is a lot more reliable than a cable spinning in a housing.

Here's how I did mine Speedometer sensor mounting (2 piston caliper)

On a TI bike the connection for an electronic tach is easy, just connect the instrument's tach sense wire directly to either the blue or yellow wire at the coils. It isn't that hard with CDI either but I can't remember off hand where to connect it.

FWIW, I have Danmoto 180 instruments on both of my bikes. I used to recommend them highly because they are attractive, well made and even have wires that mostly match Honda's colours + a really good instruction sheet. I don't recommend them quite as highly these days because I needed a replacement for one of the rubber buttons and Danmoto told me they didn't have parts and were discontinuing all of their speedometers when current stock ran out. (I was able to salvage arubber part from something else and modify the 180 to use it).
But if you aren't concerned about that you can still order one for $70 US (half price) Danmoto 180º Digital Cockpit [SP-00008] - $70.00 : Danmoto, Motorcycle Racing Parts & Accessories

BTW: Welcome to the forum. Please add your location to your profile and your bike's model and model year to your signature so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget.

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike has had about 4 decades of Previous Owners who may or may not have done the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage. I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel because old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet. If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Most electronic speedos use a magnet mounted on the wheel (usually in the brake disc carrier) and a sensor mounted where the magnet will pass it every time the wheel rotates. This is not terribly difficult to do and is a lot more reliable than a cable spinning in a housing.

Here's how I did mine Speedometer sensor mounting (2 piston caliper)

On a TI bike the connection for an electronic tach is easy, just connect the instrument's tach sense wire directly to either the blue or yellow wire at the coils. It isn't that hard with CDI either but I can't remember off hand where to connect it.

FWIW, I have Danmoto 180 instruments on both of my bikes. I used to recommend them highly because they are attractive, well made and even have wires that mostly match Honda's colours + a really good instruction sheet. I don't recommend them quite as highly these days because I needed a replacement for one of the rubber buttons and Danmoto told me they didn't have parts and were discontinuing all of their speedometers when current stock ran out. (I was able to salvage arubber part from something else and modify the 180 to use it).
But if you aren't concerned about that you can still order one for $70 US (half price) Danmoto 180º Digital Cockpit [SP-00008] - $70.00 : Danmoto, Motorcycle Racing Parts & Accessories

BTW: Welcome to the forum. Please add your location to your profile and your bike's model and model year to your signature so that you don't have to remember to tell us every time and we don't have to keep asking when you forget.

And welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike has had about 4 decades of Previous Owners who may or may not have done the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage. I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. Check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel because old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet. If your bike still has the original rubber brake line(s) (should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes = 5 or 6 years) I recommend shopping for modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid).
Thanks so much! These are awesome suggestions. I really appreciate it and wish I would've found this forum a long time ago. I updated my signature.

You're exactly right about them owning us!
 
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