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I am looking into adding a sidecar to my GL500i, but I don't like the look of the standard sidecars I see. Granted, some are really outrageous looking - and well more than I can afford. I have been playing with the idea of taking a fiberglass '32 Ford Roadster pedal car body to make a really cool sidecar. It is actually 46" long, and it think it would be an eye catcher. Only $200 for the body.



Do any of you have a sidecar on your bike, and if so, can you let me know how it mounts? I plan on running the back tire (a little wide) on the outside with no fender - kinda like the classic roadsters. Let me know what you think. I really do need to know how they mount on these bikes though, so please let me know if you have any ideas.









Here are the dimensions:



[font="'Arial Black"][font="'Arial Black"]

Measurements: 46" LONG 8" FRONT END WIDTH 17 1/2" MID-BODY WIDTH 18" REAR WIDTH 9 1/2" TALL (not including windshield) 13" TALL (including windshield) OPENING ON TOP 17 1/2" X 18". Wheel Base 32"
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That would be an interesting idea. Several have sidecars but they're a trick. I believe Sidecar Bob has info on how the frame hooks up. The problem is not having a downtube on the frame to hook on to.
 

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I like the idea, depending on what you plan on using it for, I don't know if it is big enough for an adult to sit in.
 

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The eventual sidehack is my goal for my CX 500, mostly for winter riding - slippery stuff. I've owned sidehacks before and have heard that the cx combination is a good one if not overloaded. There are a ton of resources out there for set up, mounting, etc. Even with a already "matched set"

it's a several hour job to set one up, but pretty straightforward as far as toe in and tip out. Premade universal mounting systems for the cx run a little over $500. Most side cars that you buy will have the mounting apparatus, but may or may not work with the bike.



The front end of the cx would be the week link (sorry about the pun!). If you haven't driven a sidecar before, find a way to do that. It is radically different as the bike no longer leans and you no longer turn by counter-steering - you steer by steering through the corners. You may or may not like it - especially right hand turns when the car lightens - you find out why you never run with one empty. Always carry some weight in there.



I found that I rarely carried a passenger in my sidecar, but it was much easier to carry "stuff" - even 8 ft two by fours. Please keep us posted on this project as will I when I get going on this. MZ
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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That body would make a cool looking sidecar - for a scooter. If your passengers were all really short and really skinny. The average sidecar for a full sized bike is in the 6 foot long range and a minimum of 21 inches wide in the opening. Consider how hard it would be for you to climb into a pedal car made for small children.

You may not intend to carry adults, but you eventually will want to (or the kids will grow up). When I got my first sidecar I could carry our youngest two in the sidecar and the oldest on the back of the bike. Last year I drove the youngest to her wedding in a sidecar.



As I have said before: I absolutely recommend against building your own first sidecar. There are too many things you can do wrong if you don't know how a sidecar is supposed to work that can endanger your life. Buy a used Velorex of something similar and drive it for a year or two first.
 

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[quote name='Lamonta"]it's a several hour job to set one up[/quote]

If you have done it before and know what you are doing. I would say expect a full day to get everything done and expect to make changes over the next few weeks as you learn how it is supposed to work.



Always carry some weight in there.
A properly set up sidecar outfit shouldn't need any ballast. I carry some tools and a jack in my Velorex all of the time and so far nothing in the Dnepr except a few bungees (note to self: remember get a jack for the big sidecar) as the tools ride in the saddlebag.

The trick is to forget the absolute lean out numbers the literature recommends and remember what leanout is for - to let the bike sit more or less upright when you are driving the outfit with a normal load on a typical road. All roads have some crown so leaning the bike to the left theoretically keeps the bike upright, but it has been my experience that mid to light weight outfits (like my CX650/Velorex) that are normally run without a passenger often need to be set up so that the bike leans in (closer to the sidecar at the top) in order to make the bike sit upright on a normally crowned road when the bike's suspension is holding up the weight of the bike + maybe 200Lb of driver.



I do carry a 2 gallon jug of water (about 20 Lb) in the winter, but only to help the sidecar tire cut through any snow that might be on the road. The bike's tires, with the weight of bike + driver on them,

cut through the snow easily, but the wheel of an empty sidecar tends to ride up over the snow, which tips the whole outfit to the left. This is another reason why the sidecar tire should be as narrow as possible (I run a 3.25-16 rib tread).
 
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