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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The task was to build a battery holder for a customized CX 500, on which, in addition to the battery itself, the entire electrical system can be hidden under the seatbench. Just in the place where the air filter and CDI are located normally.

The CDI has been replaced by an Ignitech CDI, which is fixed under the tank.


So far, so well.

Since, like most of the others, I don't have a bench, I want to show step by step that it can be done without. It just takes a little longer. :giggle:

But that doesn't matter if, like most of the people here, you don't have to do it every day. The important thing is that "there is no such thing as impossible".


... At the beginning there is a flat sheet of metal, the first of which is to fold the two brackets upwards for fastening in the frame:

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Before we start with the edge bending, about 2.5 mm large holes are drilled in the inner corners, which later results in nicer corners when edging.


For the edge bending itself we use any U-steels, angle irons, plates or whatever else has accumulated in the scrap or scrap box.

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Sometimes you have to improvise a bit in order to be able to clamp the workpiece in the vice. ;)

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When edging "boxes", you have to use long segments on a cant bench. We make do with a U-profile that we have cut to the inside dimensions of the box. The material can be processed very easily with a 1 mm cutting disc.

These two photos show what exactly is meant by this:

So we don't get the thing folded up

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... but this is how it works. :D

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The best way to turn the sheets over is to use a blow-back hammer, which is available in different sizes. The hammer shouldn't be too small, i.e. from 800 g upwards.

Lighter upstands and if we have large surfaces we can do it by hand. So that the sheet is evenly turned over, we use a plate placed behind it for pressing.

Of course you use both hands to do this, but with the second I just had to operate the camera.

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The sheet metal was clamped into the frame with auxiliary materials.

The flat iron placed under the frame tubes and the sheet metal protruding from underneath serve to set the distance between the carrier plate and the bottom.

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...to be continued i the next post. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
So the tabs could be placed nicely around the pipe. They were provided with extra length and were cut off accordingly after being folded down.


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The other dimensions have, among other things, from the size of the battery and were drawn directly on the sheet metal.

What you have to pay attention to when defining the edges is the sheet thickness, which you either have to add or account for, depending on whether the inside or outside dimension is required. Since I used 1.5 sheet metal, in my case the base plate in the area of the rear tabs was 3 mm narrower than the clear distance between the tubes and the line to the edge was on the edge of the sheet, so that the tabs were then measured outside / outside correspond exactly to the distance between the pipes.

The trick with the front small tabs was that they were made separately and then simply pushed into place, fixed on the sheet metal with gripping pliers and then welded on. Measurement was not necessary and measurement was not possible.


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The holes I mad with two different sized punching holes, like those used for cable feedthroughs. Of course, you can also do that with a step drill or whatever you have. ;)


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A simple sheet metal bracket is used to hold the battery. The pencil lines have nothing to say here. They were on the sheet before.


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I used screw nuts to screw on the tab. This can of course also be done with simple nuts or sheet metal screws. ;)


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Then there was a holder for the magnetic switch, a ground point and two lugs at the front to attach to the frame.


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I used a resistance spot welding gun for this. This can of course also be done with a MIG / MAG welding machine or whatever. If necessary, you can also screw.

If you do not want to or are not allowed to weld on the (auxiliary) frame, you can attach the entire holder to the frame with body adhesive. Only then an additional cable has to be laid from the ground point to a conductive connection.

The controller was screwed on from below for better cooling and space

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Fully installed and painted, the whole thing looks like this


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General tips for bending sheet metal

...When bending sheet metal it´s important that the edges around which the sheet metal is placed have a small radius. With sheet steel, the natural radius of the U-steel or an angle iron is sufficient. Edges that have been cut or sawn with the flex should be rounded off a little.

In the case of aluminum sheet, it is also important to place the edge as transverse to the rolling direction as possible so that the sheet does not tear.

(Auxiliary) lines on aluminum should never be made with a scriber. Better to use a fine liner. By tearing with the scriber, the sheet metal is weakened and a notch effect is created that can tear or break the sheet metal.

The minimum bending radius of aluminium depends on the thickness of the sheet and the hardness of the alloy. With 1.5 - 2 times the sheet metal thickness you are usually not wrong. ;)
 
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