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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yeah. I over-torqued this stud bolt, and it snapped off sometime during a ride. I loosened the other nut as soon as I noticed that it had broken.



The end that's left in the engine is recessed about 5mm.



I know the basic theory behind using a screw extractor, but I'm worried about accidentally damaging the engine block.



Any advice on removing this?



Thanks.



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Since its recessed it will be a pain in the but, but doable. You are going to have to drill a hole in as close to the center of the bolt fragment you can. Take your time and use a really small bit at the start, the smaller the better, just try as hard as possible to keep it centered. I would drill in about 1/8 " just enough to get a "centered pilot hole" in place. Drilling to deep with a small bit can have it break off and put you in a bigger mess. Once the pilot hole is there use a drill the size you need for the extractor, and just drill in really slow and steady (not sure how deep you need to go for the extractor OR how deep the stud is). It will take a while any you may need more than one bit (they dull fast). Then, when done with any luck the extractor will get it out for you.



Hardest part is taking your time to get the hole in as close to the bolts ceter as you can. This is the time consuming part, but important, as if your hole "wanders" to the thread area it can make it impossible to get it out. Take your time and try to drill straight down the center of the bolt. Good luck
 

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Bummer. A couple of options. One, would be to remove the head and take it to a machine shop for removal. Two, would be to try it on the bike. Let's try the fun one.



I would remove the header pipe and carefully center punch the stud end. Try to get it as centered as possible. Then soak the end with penetrating fluid. Some say that a 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone works the best. Try to keep it soaked with a rag, dam made of plumbers putty, etc as long as possible. And tapping with the center punch while soaking can only help. Some heat from a micro torch may also help it to soak in. You won't be able to heat it very much, but a little is better than none.



After you get tired of waiting, (I would leave soak overnight), find a hollow bushing, pipe, cylinder, or anything that has a OD to allow as snug as possible fit into the finned header clamp hole. Then find a drill bit that closely matches the ID of the cylinder. A left hand drill bit would be best, if you can get one. Harbor Freight does sell them. Then using the existing stud, attach the finned clamp back over the exhaust port.



You should now have a decent guide for drilling straight into the stud and not wandering off at a angle. Try to use as small of bit as possible on the first go-around. With a straight, well centered small hole, you can then enlarge it to accept a Easy Out that maybe won't snap off when you try to ease the stud out. A left handed drill bit may just spin it out by itself. But probably not. Don't drill so large that the Easy Out expands the stud even tighter when you tap it it.



These studs can be very tight, liberal use of penetrating fluid, shocking the stud with hammer blows, good drilling technique, and gentle but firm Easy Out use is the key.
 

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If you have a welder you can hold a nut over the center of the broken stud end and weld in the center of the nut to attache it to the stud. Then just turn the nut to remove the broken stud. This works great on aluminum head cars. It should work on a bike too.
 

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Don't use cheap ez-outs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the help, guys!



I like the sound of the welding solution. Will try that after it's been soaked in WD-40 for a while.
 

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Leave the exhaust flange on there and use it as a guide to drill it with a similar size left handed threaded cobalt drill bit. More than likely you'll booger up the threads, so repair the threads with a time-sert or a heli-coil repair kit. Time-serts and heli-coils in aluminum heads are a must! U never trust aluminum alloy heads without em'!
 
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