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Sea Foam



I'd like to know what really is the deal. I have heard some conflicting opinions, so maybe having them all in one spot can guide us overall a bit better.



Does this stuff do our machines any real good? Why and how?



What are the alternatives? I've heard mention of B-12. What makes that better??

B-12



What do these things do, aside from the claims stated????



Curious minds.........





Joel in the Couve
 

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joel,although iv never seen it or used it[cannot buy it here].

from what iv read,its good gear.think of it like a joint detergent and lubricant for the whole fuel system
 

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Joel, I have interest in this too. I admit I have a can of the stuff on my shelf and have bought many of bottles in the past. A recent post by Marshal about stabil really got me thinking on this seafoam though. Yea, I know it makes the exhaust smoke when I put it in the fuel system. So what. I have never torn down an engine put it back together used the stuff then torn it down again to compare. Might be educational and save some future monies.

One certain thing I do know is that I use gasoline to wash/soak parts in a coffee can not seafoam.
 

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Sea Foam



I'd like to know what really is the deal. I have heard some conflicting opinions, so maybe having them all in one spot can guide us overall a bit better.



Does this stuff do our machines any real good? Why and how?



What are the alternatives? I've heard mention of B-12. What makes that better??

B-12



What do these things do, aside from the claims stated????



Curious minds.........





Joel in the Couve


I cannot comment on B12 as I have not used it. This week here on the forum is the first I have heard of it. I will probably try it though to investigate it.



I have used Seafoam and have recommend it many times when people have had minor problems with their CX/GL bikes. In many cases it saved them from having to rebuild their carbs and has also eliminated minor water problems in their gas tanks.



Is it a cure all ... no. Does it help? In many cases the answer would be yes. If the bike seems to run okay, but has hesitation on acceleration, it can help eliminate varnish that might be causing the problem. Sometimes it will even clear up problems that are a little more severe.



If the carbs are vanished/gunked up up badly only buying Larry's book and following the directions or sending the carbs off to Larry will help.



I use it from time to time in my fuel injected bike and car, just to keep the injectors clean and I have been able to tell a before and after difference in my car.



Take it for what it is worth ... it isn't a snake oil product, but it isn't a cure all either.
 

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As mentioned, Seafoam will help clean the fuel system when used in accordance with its instructions. It works fairly well.



But don't be tempted to increase the concentration, thinking if some is good then more must be even better. More than one forum member has gummed up his carbs this way; then it's necessary to disassemble them for cleaning. That pretty much defeats the purpose of using it in the first place.
 

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As others have said it won't do harm and can do good.It's basically the same as many other Petrol treatments like STP/RedX/Wynns.It can help keep the carbs clean and is useful for,"Winterizing" as a fuel stabilizer and can help prevent tank corrosion.



It will not however fix already badly gunged up carbs.



I would not pay premium prices for the Brand name though as any supermarket version will do.
 

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I have use Seafoam for years in both 2 and 4 stroke engines.

The nice thing about it is that it will mitigate a lot of problems that arise from E10/15 fuel.

Stabilizes the gas that sits for any length of time (a month or more) and will keep a carb clean and can remove minor varnishing.





This is my experience and in no way to be considered proof of anything but my own observation.
 

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I use Seafoam regularly in the old bikes and can attest to it claims.



The GL took 2 tankfuls to see actually quite remarkable results in throttle smoothness.



I am impressed.
 

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I used seafoam on a 1986 Kawasaki that ran but balked when given heavy throttle. I poured it in the tank then drove around for about a half an hour with no real effect, but then while I gave it the gas the engine coughed, sputtered and spit out what ever was gumming up the carbs. That bike has run great for 2 years now. I'm a believer.
 

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Easy enough to boil down, both are a mixture of solvents and B-12 is about twice as strong.



If you want to duplicate SeaFoam mix B-12 with a bit of Coleman camping fuel.



Some time back a guy I know had a seriously slipping auto tranny in his car. I put 1/2 a can of B-12 into it, told him to go out for at least a 60 mile drive to evaporate the solvent from the ATF. Rubber seals obtained new life, solenoids quit sticking and 2 years later it was still performing like new.



If I want a mild crankcase flush I'll replace about 1/3 of the oil with diesel fuel, warm the engine without driving it and drain. If it's really sludged up I'll add some B-12 but some amount of danger is involved there, old hydraulic lifters often depend on the sludge.



Not a problem in our case, a bit of B-12 (say 4 oz) in the oil is going to clean off the clutch plates as well as the rest of the internals.



To beat all it's like $3 vs. $7, another $7 for a full gallon of Coleman fuel if you choose but you'll find plenty of other uses for it as a rather good mild solvent.
 

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Shep, next time you buy a bottle of STP gas treatment give it a smell, then go smell some diesel fuel.
 

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Shep, next time you buy a bottle of STP gas treatment give it a smell, then go smell some diesel fuel.


Most of these petrol treatments are just a form of light oil of one form or another.Some are even hydraulic fluid re-badged.We've been using stuff like it in the Aircraft industry to lubricate fuel injectors in diesel cars running<cough> some fuel they may have found on-site




I don't buy into the hyperbole of Salesmen and Advertising.I test and ask
 

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True, however a few do vary such as Techron. I don't know about over there but around here there's a requirment that the pump gas contains a certain amount of detergent level. On a car, nothing will take the place of an occasional cleaning with stuff you've got to kindly remind the NAPA people that they've probably got it in the back. Guy on eBay used to sell a homemade rig that would hook up to the cans. I've got one somewhere and it isn't hard to describe how to duplicate it.



Far more expensive than their generic but the only example I can find easily.

http://www.napaonline.com/Search/Detail.aspx?R=MMM08956_0006436575



Morpholine Oleate and 2-butoxyethanol were the detergents, mostly Hexane for the engine to run with. The 3M stuff is about twice the price and far less effective.
 

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I too am a Seafoam user, though I have no experience with B-12. I use Seafoam regularly in the gasoline on all of my bikes. It has certainly cleaned up carb problems on my older bikes, and kept my injectors clear on my newer bike. AS well, it is an excellent stabilizer for winter storage.



Just my experience...



STAN
 

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Used Seafoam in my V65 when I got it. It was idling rough and hesitating. I read about it on a V4 site where everybody was raving about it. Well, it fixed my problems and it's been 2 years. I used 1/2 a can in a full tank. Ran the bike to get it into to carbs, let it sit for a day, then ran the whole tank through. Now I put an ounce or two in the tanks of all my bikes when I think of it.



I'm sold on it.
 

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To each his own, I'm not adverse to dropping 5-10% of agricultural diesel fuel in my tank - the kind that isn't limited as to sulfur content. Old trick that partially makes up for not having the tetraethyl lead content to interface with the valve seats. High compression = higher octane neccesary = higher exhaust temps.



Given a choice I'd run 100LL 50/50 with good gas from the pumps.
 
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