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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if putting tubes in our tubeless tires enhances the safety factor regarding rapid deflation [which we all know rarely happens but it does happen occasionally]. My understanding is that the tires will run warmer than normal but is this potentially safer? Pros and con?
 

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IF you want to run Tubes - then go ahead - but it's a waste of money, why do you think they invented a tubeless system ?? - smarter - cheaper - better, or so you could add some tubes to them if you thought it would be safer ?? I dunno - but you got my 2 cents worth
 

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The only reason to install tubes on a tubeless rim I can think of is if some total moron of a tyre fitter has gouged up the tyre mounting flanges on the rim so badly that you can't get an air tight seal.
 

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I am no expert but the tires were designed to run without tubes. I have been told the tires are going to run at different temps with tubes, which can affect traction.



You stand a much greater chance of rapid deflation WITH tubes than without. The valve stem on a tube does not seal at all in our rims, and a hole in the tube caused by a nail etc will leak air out the stem hole. Add to that the problem of having to repair a tire on the side of the road somewhere and it really makes no sense at all to run tubes.
 

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I've run with tubes and none tubes.I didn't notice any differences.About the only advantage I could see would be if on a long journey where you might not have access to repair/exchange facilities it may be possible to repair the tube if you get a puncture.



My 10 penn'th.
 

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IMO go tubeless.

No advantage in tubes and the only reason I can think of why they were fitted is

when a tyre fitter couldnt get a seal on the rim and it was quicker to fit a tube

than clean up the rim.



There are options as regards getting/fixing punctures on tubeless

which do not involve wheel removal at the side of the road

These are

Cans of Pre or Post puncture Tyre sealant or tyre plugging kits

I've used em all with good results and got home without having

to a remove a wheel.

Some folk have even left plugs and sealant in until the tyre wore out.
 

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I've run with tubes and none tubes.I didn't notice any differences.About the only advantage I could see would be if on a long journey where you might not have access to repair/exchange facilities it may be possible to repair the tube if you get a puncture.



My 10 penn'th.
Now Shep, how many miles percentage wise do you put on at over 60mph? Here in the USA the majority of the miles are at 60 to 75mph, so heat is more of an issue.



This isn't a knock of riding in the UK, but rather the differences between here and there.



The biggest advantage of a tube is if you are riding off road or in a third world country where you may have major puncture to a tire, but you can still get to the next civilized area to get a new tire by patching a tube or even replacing it.
 

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Now Shep, how many miles percentage wise do you put on at over 60mph? Here in the USA the majority of the miles are at 60 to 75mph, so heat is more of an issue.



This isn't a knock of riding in the UK, but rather the differences between here and there.



The biggest advantage of a tube is if you are riding off road or in a third world country where you may have major puncture to a tire, but you can still get to the next civilized area to get a new tire by patching a tube or even replacing it.


Most of my riding is above 60 Mph.If heat at speed were an issue with tube type tyres there would have been problems years ago with even older motorcycles that were well capable of sustained high speed running well over 60 Mph.



In my youth and on my Norton 500 I ran tube-type tyres and rarely ever dropped below 70 Mph as soon as I was out of the city(which in my case living on the edge of town is about 10 mins max) before the invention of,"Speed Cameras"




I think it's a none issue at the speeds these bikes can do.Also there are spoked rimmed bikes that can only run on Tube-type and some of them are very capable of high sustained speeds.A couple of years ago I chatted with the owner of a Vincent,"Black Lightening" who regularly used the bike to go to London and he told me he sits at a,"Ton" where he can
 

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A nail in a tubeless tire may not be noticed for days or weeks as the air slowly leaks out.



A nail in a tube tire may be the last thing you ever notice.


I agree. Back in the day (and now while riding vintage iron) there wasn't a choice. The wheels were all spokes and the tubes were a necessary evil. I had several catastrophic blow outs at highway speeds caused by punctures while riding spoke wheels and tubes. I was lucky never to lose a front or I might not be typing this.



Now one of my main criteria in selecting a bike to own and ride at speed is tubeless wheels and tires; call it survival instinct. I automatically disregard any bike with spokes, no matter how cool it looks. Of course checking pressures and tire condition are important items in the pre-ride checklist regardless of tire type.



The tires designed for tube use are built differently than tubeless tires, aren't they?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks guys. My question was well answered. Sometimes more [as in the case of adding tubes] is defineatly not better. Today the Mpls. area is expected to get 14 to 16 inches of snow. Maybe I'll have to get chains on my bike. Ha!
 
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