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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All,

I am currently starting my first build on a 1979 CX500, I recently received the bike from a friend that was attempting to build a cafe racer but had to move to an apartment. Some of the standard steps for stripping the bike down have been taken care of and I am currently looking at what is a pretty stripped bike. The engine is in good condition. I have decided to follow my friends initial build but vary it slightly to having a cafe/brat style finish. My goal is to place a CBR600/1000 rr front end of the bike as well as to update the rear shocks to the same bike for height. I want to rewire the bike while updating the electrical components. I am also hoping to update the rear brakes to disk brakes if possible.

With the age of the bike I wanted to remove the frame to be sand blasted and powder coated. Before taking on this as a task, I was wanting to know if anyone had any advise toward the process of dropping out the engine. Any risks, concerns etc..

I have a cherry picker in my shop that will allow me to hang the frame safely while dropping out the engine for cleaning and upgrading etc.

Thanks,
Andrew
 

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Download a copy of the FSM (Factory Service Manual) from the WIKI site. Many memeber signatures have direct links.

Step by step is in the FSM.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Knute, I had downloaded the FSM already and had read up on how to remove it, I am just hoping to mitigate any risk that someone with more experience can warn me of.
 

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There's little risk beyond literally dropping the engine. These are a very easy engines to get out and back in. A large trolley jack works well.

Don't forget to unhook the driveshaft. ;) Or the tach cable.
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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As Knute said, getting the engine out is pretty easy.

I disagree on the use of a trolley jack, though. I tried that one time and almost dropped an engine on my toes. I prefer to use a flat dolly (basically a board with a caster at each corner). I roll it under the engine, add blocking to support the engine, go through the steps in the FSM to make sure everything is disconnected that needs to be and roll the engine out from under the bike on the dolly. With your cherry picker you could just put blocking under the engine to support it, disconnect everything and lift the bike off of the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Bob,

I intend to do exactly that, currently the whole bike is on a dolly, I'll lift everything off after taking the FSM steps, appreciate the advice!
 

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i had never done a teardown or rebuild before but with the help of the FSM it was almost easy. i had done this job 3 times now, mainly for upgrades but that FSM makes it easy. step by step. if you have any questions im here.
 

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also. a standard milk crate (the square ones) almost fit perfectly under the engine for dropping if you put a 2x4 under the front wheel. i read this somewhere and tried it and it worked like a charm. something to consider. also, take pictures of things you are unfamiliar with, for me it helped, clutch cable assembly photos, wiring harness photos, etc. any pictures you take of how things are originally with help out if you get stuck.
 

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Another little thing: after you remove the bolt that holds the final shaft to the drive shaft, push the drive shaft back as far as it will go...and the final shaft forward; both have a small amount of play. You will see at that point that they are still not completely separated yet, which means that as the engine comes down, it has to go forward a little bit. Separating them as much as possible, beforehand, also helps make sure that if they are stuck together a bit, you will know before you're actually moving the engine.
Whatever method you use to lower the engine, if you don't have a helper to push the engine forward, a non-metallic pry tool (dowel, stick, whatever) between the rear cover and the frame helps nudge the engine forward as it comes down.
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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If you are doing it right you should move it forward until the shaft disengages and then out to the left side. It should not move down until it is clear of everything.

Even when I am removing the engine with both of the bike's wheels on the ground so I don't have to fully detach the sidecar or mount a centrestand I can get the shaft clear without prying anything.
 
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