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I had rotator cuff surgery on my left shoulder back in february, full thichness complete tear of one of the muscles. I'm going to physical therapy twice a week and working on getting my range of motion and strength back. I know in the end it's entirely up to me to decide when I feel safe riding again but I'm just curious who has had any type of arm or leg surgery and how long it took you to feel confident to ride again? It's killing me not being on the bike, this is the best time of year for riding where I am, not too hot, not too cold, goldie-locks weather.
 

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Start small, short ride stop before it hurts. Listen to your body and to your physiotherapist. I was eager to get back to activities after spine surgery. The surgeon said six months, I waited. Glad I did.
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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Mine was only a half thickness tear. I was only off work for 3 months (returned for a couple of hours per day the first week and built up to full time over the next few weeks). I was back on Eccles as soon as the physio told me I could, at first driving to my appointments with her.
What does your therapist say?
 

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Listen to the doc and the therapist.
I had my left foot rebuilt in 2016 and was chomping at the bit to get on the bike. I got the okay and over did it the first day. Paid dearly for it the rest of the week.

Also, if you are back to riding and take the occasional pain killer, such as Vicoden, before going to bed, give your system an extra day to flush it out before getting back on two wheels. That way you aren't halfway to work and realize that two wheels was a very bad idea.

I still get willies thinking about that ride.
 

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As mentioned above, take it very easy at first. Make sure you can sit on the bike with no discomfort (mainly knees/ankle injuries) and practice them in the garage. Make sure you are strong enough to move the bike, up and down the driveway, etc. You don't want to get stuck and not be able to push it. And as said before, take a limited ride. For example, 30 minutes and make it a hard stop. Make sure you let people know where you are going and when you'll be back.

Your body has to get back in the shape of riding plus the healing from the surgery. I imagine that it is harder on arms/shoulder injuries. After my surgery I practiced just like it was a work out at the gym. Overall strength will have diminished/changed, so you won't be able to do everything you did before.

I had a bilateral knee arthroscopy and the doc never did give me permission. He was used to dealing with fragile 70+ out of shape patients. I mainly worked with my PT by telling them what I wanted to accomplish after surgery and did the work. After I was comfortable riding again.... bought a new bike too.

Good luck.
 
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