Honda CX 500 Forum banner

41 - 57 of 57 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,868 Posts
Super *easy...



But opening up the speedo is what I am trying to accomplish
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,868 Posts
Well... I just answered my own question... Found that second rind on the base of the speedo :) der
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Hello, I would like to know where to get. a couple of the bands shown in this picture, I butchered mine trying the peel it of method, the type shown here would be the easy answer for my clocks.
Thanks Staff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Hi there, can you tell me where I could get hold of a couple of the bands shown in the picture ? I butchered mine trying to peel them off. These are just what I need.
Thanks Staff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I'm not with my bike to try it at this time, but I'm thinking of fixing my speedo, whose backing (the numbers on the plastic(?) plate) has begun to spin due to the screws coming loose and falling out from previous owner. The process of opening up the speedo seems easy enough once it's off the bike, but what is required to get to the gauges of a GL500 interstate? Will I need to remove the fairing? How involved is removal of the gauge? Anyone have a guide to that?

Thanks,
Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,167 Posts
most of us here who do it, do it for our selves and not for a resale bike........so "the man" can just stick it!

Trust me, we all know and could care less
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,445 Posts
Yeah, we have that law here too. But it is intended to prevent people from resetting the odometer to a lower reading, not to prevent people from repairing them. Besides, what happens if your speedometer fails and you have to replace it? If you buy a used one wouldn't you would naturally choose the one with lowest mileage in hopes that it would last longer? And what if you buy a brand new aftermarket one? It would read 00000.0 when you installed it!

I have aftermarket speedometers on both of mine but I have pretty good records in my maintenance logs so that I can look up what I have to add to the current reading to know what the total is and if I was selling one of them I would happily show that information to the buyer.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,346 Posts
I'm not with my bike to try it at this time, but I'm thinking of fixing my speedo, whose backing (the numbers on the plastic(?) plate) has begun to spin due to the screws coming loose and falling out from previous owner. The process of opening up the speedo seems easy enough once it's off the bike, but what is required to get to the gauges of a GL500 interstate? Will I need to remove the fairing? How involved is removal of the gauge? Anyone have a guide to that?

Thanks,
Tom
Getting the speedometer off can be easy or a pain. It will probably be easier to remove the fairing to get access and not be all bent up awkwardly trying to turn a wrench.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
The Honda SOHC4 forum's tips on removing the speedo needle is to use a pair of spoons, one on each side of the needle, to use to simultaneously pry the needle up off the shaft. The curve of the spoon serves as the fulcrum against the instrument face. It is used successfully to remove the needle off of CB500/CB550/CB650/CB750 SOHC4 speedos. Since many of them are built close to the same time it is safe to say their design is very similar.



David
Is this also how you would recommend taking off the trim monitor knurl. My lens glass broke and the knurl prevents the housing from being separated. I didn't want to break the knurl by prying on it.
 

·
Registered
1982 cx500
Joined
·
2 Posts
No need to pull any thing apart,this is the way to do it and no other way .drill 3/16 hole on top off gauge close to the chrome rim above the large kilometre / mileage number, now insert a small jewellers flat blade screw driver down into the joint between the wheel's and now you can manipulate the wheel's doesn't take much use a torch from the front and you can see the wheel moving, if you want to do the other end drill another hole when done fill hole with sealant.Cheers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
no one wants to use "the used car shifty" of just attaching the cable to a drill chuck and advancing as needed,;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,433 Posts
Larry not to discourage anyone but there is a less involved way if you don't want to take the speedo needle and face off.



Press firmly on the number rollers with your thumbs and then press down and forward in the directions the numbers should roll and they will fall into place. I do each roller separately. Once I get to the number i want I rock it back and forth to make sure the plastic or metal piece springs back.



I have a tested one at 6 miles in the kitchen.



Maybe we should also show them how they are held together. I might have a set of numbers in a keep jar.
I've probably done more than a dozen like this over the years, too risky to take off those small bits.
Nothing nefarious, I like to match mileage with the bike when changing the speedo, most replacements were to get rid of the ridiculous 85mph speedo's.

It works well on cars too, like on the ole Mercyless Benz's, the gears that needs to be changed to get the odo working again cost $50++ IF you can find it, used clusters usually go for that or less.

Also, be wary when buying used speedo's. I bought a GL650 (cheap) from someone on the board, the odo numbers are so yellowed that it is unusable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,433 Posts
doesn't take much use a torch from the front
I usually take a torch to the whole part when things go badly. Gives me time to rethink take a torch to the whole vehicle. ;-)
 
  • Like
Reactions: CXPHREAK

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,066 Posts
I had a friend back in the day (over 30+ years ago) and he drilled a hole big enough in the speedo case for a pencil to fit in. He'd use the eraser of the pencil to spin the dials around. He said it didn't work on all speedos but he said he had success with it quite a few times.
 
41 - 57 of 57 Posts
Top