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Hey y'all, this is my first post here. So I'll preemptively thank you for your patience as I learn how to navigate the forum.

I picked up this CX500 on the relative cheap this past summer and have been riding around, getting used to it and what not. Now, that it's getting colder, I'm looking to clean it out, change the oil, all the fluids, and add some performance and aesthetic mods. First thing I'm going to do is repaint the bumpers, because whoever painted them last used a paint that is peeling terribly.

What do y'all use to remove the side cover paint? Sand paper? What grit?
What about the front wheel cover?

That's it for now. I'll be posting more I'm sure in the coming months. Stoked to be joining the community!

http://i.imgur.com/PgXEAGp.jpg
PgXEAGp.jpg
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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Welcome to the forum. http://cx500forum.com/forum/general-discussion/31323-forum-settings-everyone-should-make.html

"Wheel cover" is another word for a car's hub cap. Bikes don't have them so I think you mean the fender. I can't figure out what you could possibly mean by "bumpers".

The best way I have come up with for sanding plastic parts is to put some sort of support under the part and use a random orbit sander. Start with a medium grit, say 80 then fine and then go to about 120. You can hand sand with finer than that if you want but i prefer to prime it first so that I can see if any dings or scratches needs filling. If there are I use spot filler, which is really just a very thick primer that can be applied with a spatula or spreader. When that has cured hand sand with 180 or 220, then prime again and if it looks OK sand with 320 or 400. If you are only trying to make a daily runner look nice you can stop there and apply the first coat of colour. If you are trying to have a show finish you will want to block sand with progressively finer grades until the surface is so smooth it almost shines before you start with the colour.
 

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1978 CX500 "The Grub", '83 GL650, '82 GL500 Project "AdventureWing", '79 CX500C, '78 CX500 Scrambler
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Assuming those are the stock chrome fenders under the paint, a chemical paint stripper will make short work of it. You'll want an automotive stripper from an auto store, not something from Home Depot.

I've had good luck with chemical stripper on some plastic parts, but it really depends on the plastic. Test it on a small area on the back side to observe the reaction before starting on exposed areas.


R
 

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I used sandpaper on all mine, metal and plastic. Really works well with an orbital sander. I think I used something around 150 and/or 220. Be careful on the plastic because if you use too much pressure or go to long you can easily start reshaping the plastic. I recommend using plastic/paint adhesion like Bulldog - - that could be why you're getting pealing. Unless that was paint over chrome, then I would still say its from improper prep. Chrome should be scuffed and sealed with self-etching primer. my 2 cents
 

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If you are repainting any plastic you only need to sand it enough to remove any gloss or decals.
Once you get that off with 100 or 200 grit you are ready to final sand with as fine a grit as you want.
Paint will stick right to it.
I assume you are talking rattle can paint job.
If you want a "professional" paint job like for your tank that might be a bit more fussy.
 

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I think all of you are recommending sandpaper that is way too course. I would start with 500 wet sanding. The finer the surface the better finish.
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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Starting with 500 is OK if you have a smooth surface to start with but if you start sanding rough & flaking paint with 500 grit you will spend all week without getting the surface smooth. 80 grit pads on my random orbit sander produce about the same fineness of finish as 140 on a block and that will knock down the high spots so that you can hand sand with finer. For that sort of work ther really isn't any point to using anything near 500 until at least the 3rd coat of primer.
 
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