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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know if any other 18" Comstars will bolt onto our bikes? I know that the CB750's had 18's for a few years and was hoping that someone had tried to fit one. I know that the '78 CX500 had the 18's, but I was hoping to find some more options...
 

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or you might have to import from europe
 

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so the gold wing wheel does fit?? same year as in 1978 ?
The Goldwing wheel fits but not when fitted with the fatter tyre. The shaft splines are the same so you don`t even have to swap over the drive coupling hub. One thing though - the Goldwing is also disc brake at the rear.
 

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Does anyone know if any other 18" Comstars will bolt onto our bikes? ................ I know that the '78 CX500 had the 18's, but I was hoping to find some more options...




Yes.... You can make your own..... Obtain a 1980 to 1982 CB750/900F rear wheel and take the Comstar wheels apart. Fit the CB-F spoke and rim to the CX500 hub, bolt it all together and now you have an 18" rear wheel.....















Good luck.
 
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Yes.... You can make your own..... Obtain a 1980 to 1982 CB750/900F rear wheel and take the Comstar wheels apart. Fit the CB-F spoke and rim to the CX500 hub, bolt it all together and now you have an 18" rear wheel.....















Good luck.


So that conversion is just simply unbolting the hub/drum from the CX rim and bolting into the CB rim? That's it?
 

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So that conversion is just simply unbolting the hub/drum from the CX rim and bolting into the CB rim? That's it?






With my GL1100 rear hub and CB900F rim, That was it ! ..



Now I'm assuming that the CX500 drum brake rear hub has the same bolt pattern, ( looks like it ), as all of the other Comstars.. It should work..



I am NOT too worried about the rivet replacement.. I would think that the Steel bolts are stronger than the stock Aluminum rivets... I'll test them out for everyone..
 

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I remember that thread. I don't think the bolt strength would be a problem, but the spokes might be somewhat compromised by the drilling out of those rivets. Seems like the load that was built in by the rivets, and how the load was distributed to the spokes might change by drilling them out and replacing with bolts. Just hunching here. The weakest link and all that.......
 

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Here's another solution


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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You guys have given me a lot to think about. Now its time to determine how much mechanical skill I really have...
 

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This is my front wheel bolted. I used all aircraft hardware, nuts, bolt, and washers. Many ultra high performance cars used modular wheel bolted together. I also used close clearance locking nuts (not the nylon type) with lock-tite, checked run out with a dial indicator, and had the wheel balanced. I've road tested it and it's solid and smooth. The front is 2.15" x18" today I'm working on the rear wheel also an 18" but not the reverse Comstars I prefer the original pattern. This is an old picture, I've done more to the bike since so excuse the messy look.

Cheers, 50gary
 

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I remember that thread. I don't think the bolt strength would be a problem, but the spokes might be somewhat compromised by the drilling out of those rivets. Seems like the load that was built in by the rivets, and how the load was distributed to the spokes might change by drilling them out and replacing with bolts. Just hunching here. The weakest link and all that.......


Rivets, I believe are designed to expand when they are compressed (riveted) in place? I used a die grinder to carefully grind off the heads and then punched them out being careful to not damage the rim or the spokes. In this case the aluminum 7mm OEM rivets used I replaced with the next SAE size larger 5/16" aircraft and used a specific sized drill bit for a very close clearance fit. Aircraft bolts have a smooth shank, no threads in the reach section of the bolt. I'm certainly no aircraft mechanic but did go to the local airport and spoke with one and ordered my hardware from an aircraft supplier. I figured I should do the best I could with a lot riding on my wheels ..me! I originally bought a bunch of aircraft rivets to try to keep the original look but that proved to be way to much trouble and expense to buy a rivet press. Rivets also are lighter weight than nuts and bolts.

Cheers, 50gary
 

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Replacing the rivets with the next larger sized aircraft bolts is a good idea.



Another way to remove rivets:



I am not an Airframe & Powerplant mechanic, but have driven lots of AN470 aircraft rivets with pneumatic rivet gun & bucking bar.



Removing original rivet:

Use a drill bit the same size as the original hole then drill the center of the original head (not the formed shop head) out just deep enough (thickness of head) to use the "other" end of the drill bit to snap the head out. Most of the time after removing the old rivet & deburring, the original size rivet can be installed.



If you use bolts, be sure to use the same grade nut as the bolt grade.



Aircraft rivets tensile strength:



http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/hapages/solidalumrivets.php



Aircraft AN3 bolts tensile strength:



http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/hapages/an3.php
 
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