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1982 CX500TC, 1969 Royal Enfield Series II Interceptor 750, 1988 Honda NT650 Hawk GT
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm starting to recondition the rear of the bike now and since I'm always trying to modernize stuff without loosing the originality of it I was wondering if any of you have tried putting needle roller bearings in the rear suspension linkage and how did that work out?
Are the bolts hardened and can they be used on a roller bearing or am I better off just fabricating the bushings again and making everything new?
Also wondering if any modifications should be made to make the rear linkage stronger or if it can be lightened up?
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CX500EC Eurosport 1982
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On the linkage itself, the pro-link, the only useful mod that I have come across is to insert some grease nipples (x3). Also people have experimented with different types of material to make the bushes, including alloys, hardened steel and even some dense nylon stuff. If I remember correctly the steel ones seemed to be preferred due to being made of the strongest most durable material. I have not done any of these mods myself; my bushes were ok as they were and I have resolved to disassemble and grease up my prolink as part of an annual (ish) service schedule anyway.
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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BTW: The bolts don't start out hardened but if the assembly isn't taken apart, cleaned and re-lubed periodically and the collars start to turn with the bearings the bolts can become work hardened and if they then get rusted to the collars removing them can become very difficult because the still soft end twists off and the hard part just dulls the drill bits.

I found out the hard way that the usual installation of zerk fittings does little good. After just a couple of years mine got to the point where I had to cut the link out with a grinder to get it apart even though I had squirted grease in several times.
To really do what is needed the bearings and collars need to be cross drilled so that the grease can get through the whole assembly, including between the collars and the bolts. Since I did that every time I have the wheel out to replace the tire I crawl under, loosen the bolts, pump grease in until it comes out at the ends of the bolts and do everything back up and it is still good 10 years and something like 33,000 Km later.
 

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1982 CX500TC, 1969 Royal Enfield Series II Interceptor 750, 1988 Honda NT650 Hawk GT
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105 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Right on!
I will consider all this.
 
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