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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So now that I have had a break in the weather and was able to go for a quick spin. I have discovered that the throw on my rear break is way too much. It takes a good two to three inches before it even engages. I have tightened the spring in the back down as far as I can and it seems to help. Anyone know of any other method to shorten the throw? PS it was fine till the break peddle fell of because the bolt fell out. (I have since invested in lock-tide.)



(PS she runs like a top! and I love my new grips so far)
 

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You will have to rotate the brake pedal on its shaft a spline or two. Not a big deal, loosen the nut on the rear drum almost all the way, then remove the brake pedal completely from the right side. Use something to push on the rear drum lever until it just begins to catch. Then hold it there with a helper or brace and slide the pedal on just slightly below the upwards stopping point. Tighten the pinch bolt on the lever, and remove the brace. Now adjust the rear nut until it feels good to you. I like to have about a half inch of travel on the lever before the brake starts coming on.
 

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Three inches in not much. You do not want the back brake to outrun the frount brake. Well what I am saying that it works like a car. the rear lags behind. You can tightien it up with the ajustment rod or the placement of the brake leaver.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It is uncomfortable with where it was set. That is why I am changing it to something that is more comfortable. I want some play. just not 3 inches.
 

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I like to have about a half inch of travel on the lever before the brake starts coming on.




Blue

Same thing here.



I'm trying to wear in a new set right now. So far they stop like crap compared to the nearly dead ones. Only a few short rides of use so far.
 

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Well, you might ride the rear brake pads and heat them up to polish them, or do like disc brakes and sand the drums a bit. The rod adjustment will place the leaver where ever you like it to be.

It has a nice adjustment to it.

I had it high one time and I found that in a hard stop that I would lock up the rear brake. So I like mine a bit longer.
 

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Or I could find some time and actually ride the bike. They were surfaced but not used. Put on Sunday.

At least it isn't snowing like it is at my brothers.
 

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Isn´t it only a sign for worn brake shoes?



I had the impression that those two punch marks (axle and arm) should line up nicely. The adjuster behind the arm on the long rod should be sufficient to adjust for comfortable slack/pedal travel. The indicator will tell when it´s time to replace the shoes.



On a couple of my bikes the adjuster nut is rather far in on the rod. I want minimal pedal travel / play (maybe I´m overdoing it a little), but so far everything works fine.



On M´lady´s CB 400 N I replaced the shoes. Aftermarket brand. They were obviously too thick. No matter how I wrestled and cursed, there was no way I could get decent pedal play on that one. I´ll just have to wait (and do a lot more of rear wheel braking than I´m used to) to wear them in. Once I had my son on too. The load caused the rear to sit much lower which in its turn caused the rear brake to be on all of the time. It was a very hot brake drum, when we arrived. I had to thread the adjuster nut all the way out (and not use the rear brake) for the return trip.



Sture
 

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You will have to rotate the brake pedal on its shaft a spline or two. Not a big deal, loosen the nut on the rear drum almost all the way, then remove the brake pedal completely from the right side. Use something to push on the rear drum lever until it just begins to catch. Then hold it there with a helper or brace and slide the pedal on just slightly below the upwards stopping point. Tighten the pinch bolt on the lever, and remove the brace. Now adjust the rear nut until it feels good to you. I like to have about a half inch of travel on the lever before the brake starts coming on.




This, but you don't need a helper if you remove the foot peg. just set the pedal on the splines at 1 oclock or so, push down on it and hold it while you put the foot peg back on. This preloads the big spring. It might take a couple shots to get it right, but it's very easy to do.
 

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i'd much rather my rear brake, brake faster than the front. i CAN control a rear-tire skid, i cannot control a front-tire skid!
 

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i'd much rather my rear brake, brake faster than the front. i CAN control a rear-tire skid, i cannot control a front-tire skid!


With all due respect:



In a serious emergency situation at speed you would be lost if you´re only using the rear brake.



How good you´re at it, there´s no way you can get the bike to a standstill fast, if not using the front brake. Plain physics!



Practice until you´ve got the feel for it!



Edit: I´ve been (together with some other guys in our local bike club) instructor /control at the annual (early spring) "derusting" exercises. I´ve often been assigned to the "70 kph emergency brake" control station.



There has been some pretty nasty spills, with guys who hadn´t learnt to do proper emergency braking. Our instructions (which they said they understood) before they tried obviously weren´t enough... One was even ambulanced to a hospital + his big, fat cruiser was a total mess.



Too much rear braking at speed - you´ve got trouble coming your way!



We want you here!



Sture
 

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Laws of physics say "sliding wheels always lead."



Guess what ... if the rear wheel slides long enough it will pass the front wheel ... except on a bike you go down before that ever happens.



70-80% of your stopping power is with the front brake.
 

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Seems like a million miles and I've got to have them. On the dirt it's rare you want to lose rear tire power but there are times where instinct prefers to put more on the rear lest you lose the front you're steering with.



A good rider, street or dirt, learns to take advantage of all they've got. On the street my front and rear come on at nearly the same time, front first of course as it lessens the possibilty of the rear coming too much into the equation. Here again is another situation where you just need to find some open places to practice in. Most of these bikes are underbraked to begin with thus learning what amount the rear can help when you need it is a priority.
 
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