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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't remember doing it but when I had the motor out last and did all the gaskets I must have used some kind of goop, probably Permatec Blue, as the transmission cover gasket was thoroughly glued to the cover when I took it off tonight and is proving to be a real treat to clear off. I don't recall having this much fun the last time so obviously I have gasket-gooped where I hadn't before.



So I'm not so much asking why I did it differently but more so which way is the right way. I've heard varying opinions and, just to muddy the murky depths of my memory even further, I use the blue goop everywhere on my van (under the hood it looks like the fan ate a smurf) but at work I only use a coating of motor oil on gaskets and dielectric grease on o-rings. Something I just learned must have pushed some of the older stuff out...



I'm buttoning it all up tomorrow (just in time for a few days of rain) so what's the deal? Who does what?
 

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Depends on the gasket you buy. Some have adhesives and some don't but goop is bad. If you make your own gaskets i'm a fan of a bit of grease on one side for ease coming off the next time. But that's if I don't use a honda gasket. With the honda gasket I go with just a clean surface as I should never have to get in there again. This is one of the places where gasket thickness doesn't exactly matter as long as it isn't thicker than stock. Because this all plays with the distance the clutch lever has to be pulled to make contact.
 

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Hylomar. Never dries, use it on all gaskets. It's what comes on the OEM pre-gooped Honda gaskets.



A thin see thru coating on mating surfaces is all you need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've heard of this Hylomar before.



Who makes it and who sells it?



I like the idea of something that encourages the non-tearing of gaskets.



Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the link. I see that it's a Permatec product which means I should be able to pick it up next door.



Thanks!
 

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One thing we used on mating surfaces in the shop was anerobic sealer. If used right it is heaven. The only thing i can see that would be an issue is the excess on the inside may have a chance to ge in to the trans if too much is used. I have never heard of the blue stuff though.
 

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One thing we used on mating surfaces in the shop was anerobic sealer. If used right it is heaven. The only thing i can see that would be an issue is the excess on the inside may have a chance to ge in to the trans if too much is used. I have never heard of the blue stuff though.


This is basically RTV which cures without air. I would not use it unless you don't have a gasket or the original assembly came with with it. If it gets in the bolt holes, especially blind bolt holes, it can create enough resistance that the bolt will not seat, and will strip aluminum housings when torqued (happened to me with a Snaab transmission.) With this stuff,you have 5 minutes before it begins to cure, if you have to pull the assembly apart or are delayed in mating, some of it will dry and may cause uneven mating/leak. Surfaces also have to be free of all contaminants, including oil.



GM used to love the stuff, but now, even the assemblies which came from the factory with this and didn't use gaskets, have gaskets listed in the parts fiche.



Try the Hylomar, you'll wonder why you ever used anaerobic or RTV sealer for assembly.
 
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