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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One more question---when reattaching the throttle cables to the carbs which is which-- The manual just says not to mix them up when disassembling--





sitting on the bike the cable throttle cableclosest to you would attach where on the carb--top or bottom??



thanks in advance
 

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Just grab a cable and twist the throttle back like accelerating. If the cable pulls in it is the one that goes farthest back. If it feeds out then it goes in front.
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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Its simple: The pull cable is the one you need, the push cable is the one you should toss in the garbage can.



The so called "push" cable (better described as the return cable) is only there so that you can close the throttle if the return spring on the carbs breaks. Since it is normally only along for the ride and never actually does anything it can rust/gum up over time and often causes much more trouble than it is designed to prevent.



I have never heard of a return spring actually breaking, but if it did you could modulate the ignition with the kill switch until you got it stopped. I had to do this once when a throttle cable got water inside and froze (I drive a sidecar outfit in the winter). A return cable would not have been able to overcome the ice without tearing the end off of the frozen cable so it would not have helped.
 

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True Bob, but the dual cables are required by law. If you don't have the 2nd one you could fail an inspection.
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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In the '80s bikes made for the Canadian market and not sold in the U.S. often had only one throttle cable (eg. my '83 GS400).



I don't know about where you live, but in Ontario vehicles are only inspected when they change hands or are first licensed by an owner (you can register a vehicle in your name as "unfit" and then have it inspected and re-register it after you fix it up) or if you are stopped by a police officer who has reason to suspect your vehicle may be unsafe.



I have had pre-registration safety inspections done on a number of bikes with only one throttle cable over the years, including both of my current bikes.
 

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Its simple: The pull cable is the one you need, the push cable is the one you should toss in the garbage can.



The so called "push" cable (better described as the return cable) is only there so that you can close the throttle if the return spring on the carbs breaks. Since it is normally only along for the ride and never actually does anything it can rust/gum up over time and often causes much more trouble than it is designed to prevent.



I have never heard of a return spring actually breaking, but if it did you could modulate the ignition with the kill switch until you got it stopped. I had to do this once when a throttle cable got water inside and froze (I drive a sidecar outfit in the winter). A return cable would not have been able to overcome the ice without tearing the end off of the frozen cable so it would not have helped.
Agreed. I usually thrown them out too!



Never had a problem with inspection yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Agreed. I usually thrown them out too!



Never had a problem with inspection yet.


when looking at the carbs I should just attach the front one? or the one thats a little tricker thats hiding???

No safety issues from not having both??
 

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No safety issues from not having both??


As Bob said, it's unlikely the return spring would fail, and you could "kill switch" if it ever did. The dual cable is part of the DOT specs, and removing it could open up future liability issues though.
 

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Yea dude i had the same problem take the push one off, that thing gets stuck so easily then your cable doesnt return, and as that other guy said, you can just shut the bike off and coast to a stop if anything happens.
 

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when looking at the carbs I should just attach the front one? or the one thats a little tricker thats hiding???

No safety issues from not having both??
IIRC it is the longer one. Its the one that "pulls" the throttle open.
 

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Two cables also helps if you're making progress and you want to snap the throttle off then straight back on again for a gear change (or dip it for a clutchless change), you can.

The `b` cable will shut the throttle smartly.



You could do it using a spring too but a strong enough spring to do it quickly would mean it takes a lot of force to open the throttle and hold it open in the first place causing hand fatigue,especially when you have four carbs to deal with like on most older UJM`s.
 

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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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I shift like that often. The spring Honda provided does the job nicely, even after all these years.



The spring isn't hauling a big load here - just the butterflies, cable & twistgrip. Unless your cable &/or twistgrip is gummed up or your handlegrip rubs against your switch cluster that's not a lot.



You have lubricated your twistgrip haven't you? A couple of drops of oil on the handlebar whenever you have the twistgrip off (every few years) is all it takes to keep it working smoothly.



Cables should be lubricated annually but you can get away with every 2-3 years if they haven't been let go for a decade or two beforehand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I shift like that often. The spring Honda provided does the job nicely, even after all these years.



The spring isn't hauling a big load here - just the butterflies, cable & twistgrip. Unless your cable &/or twistgrip is gummed up or your handlegrip rubs against your switch cluster that's not a lot.



You have lubricated your twistgrip haven't you? A couple of drops of oil on the handlebar whenever you have the twistgrip off (every few years) is all it takes to keep it working smoothly.



Cables should be lubricated annually but you can get away with every 2-3 years if they haven't been let go for a decade or two beforehand.




GREAT-thanks for all the tips--I think I will just leave the second one off-its a PITA anyway to get on the carb---I purchased the cable about a year ago before I sold and later rebought the bike--so im thinking it should still be good since the bikes been in parts for the past6-7 months....what kind of oil do you use on the twist-grip??



oh and nice sidecar---I'd love to have a set-up like that that I could attach or take off somewhat quickly--Did you fabricate the shell yourself?
 

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I just use whatever oil is at hand. Usually motor oil.



Its a Velorex Model 700 sidecar with a custom made top. I have used it every winter for the last 10 years (on 3 different bikes). I have just bought a Velorex sidecar frame to put under it because I have started wondering how much metal is left in the frame after all those years of brushing off the rust and re-painting it every year.



I set my first sidecar outfit up so I could remove the sidecar in about 5 minutes and wasted a bunch of time the first year taking it off only to put it back on a day or two later because I was going somewhere that I wanted the sidecar for. Since then I have always set them up semi-permanently. In fact, I used to have a sidecar outfit for winter and a solo bike for summer, but a couple of years ago I decided there were roads I would go down on 3 wheels but not on 2 and I missed them in the summer so I got a second sidecar for the summer bike
 
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