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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Still inching along on my triple bypass job. Bad stator and bad cam chain made the job essential. However, I am stuck (!) at the flywheel. I dutifully got a Subaru oil sump bolt, added washers, and torqued the flywheel as recommended in this forum, but it won't budge. That flywheel is a stubborn cuss.



Any recommendations, or do I simply use penetrating oil and keep on keepin' on?



AS always, I appreciate the counsel.



STAN
 

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Did you glue the washers to the tip of the bolt? If you have an impact it makes the job easy. Otherwise you probably need a strap wrench to hold the rotor and a big ratchet or wrench turning clockwise and hitting the wrench with a hammer. It should come free.
 

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Still inching along on my triple bypass job. Bad stator and bad cam chain made the job essential. However, I am stuck (!) at the flywheel. I dutifully got a Subaru oil sump bolt, added washers, and torqued the flywheel as recommended in this forum, but it won't budge. That flywheel is a stubborn cuss.



Any recommendations, or do I simply use penetrating oil and keep on keepin' on?



AS always, I appreciate the counsel.



STAN




Stan,



After you get the bolt as tight as you can hit it with a BFH (big #$%^& hammer) and it should pop right off.



You can also get it off by turning the nut in with an impact hammer.
 

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put a bar and socket on the inspection bolt at the front of the motor - after you remove the inspection cap of course. rest the bar on the clutch housing - with a small block of wood between the clutch housing and the bar.



use your flywheel removal bolt - and tighten it up - give the end of the bolt a strong tap with a hammer, tighten the bolt again, and use your socket & breaker bar or big wrench on the removal bolt then whack it with a good belt of the BFH - it should come off really easy.
 

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Do NOT, I repeat, NOT use an Impact Wrench to do this job.



I have seen what can happen if the wrench over-torques.

You can strip out the bolt AND the threads on the flywheel, then you are completely f***ed.
 

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I am a strong believer in using proper tools. Following is my photobucket link to 4 photos I took of the recommended Honda tool to hold the flywheel in place while either the front or the rear cover is off. It has helped me successfully through three teardowns (including flywheel removal). The photos show the tool in my hand and the tool as I once applied it to the front of my engine case. It also bolts onto the rear engine case. This tool allows me to apply a controlled force against the bolts I want to loosen. Another little trick I use is a pipe. I slip my 3/8" ratchet's smooth, round handle neatly into a 15" long (heavy wall) 1" diameter pipe I keep in my toolbox. This pipe gives me the extra leverage I need to apply a constant load against the socket wrench / bolt. Sometimes I do tap the pipe with a 2 lb hammer to break the death-grip of the bolt theads. Here is the link to the tool photos:



http://s773.photobuc...r%20For%20Sale/



Oh, my tool is not for sale, but I'll send dimensions to anyone who wants them. Regards,
 

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There is always risk in forcing anything. He does need the flywheel to come off. I used my 1/2" air impact wrench and it came off easy. I used the other above mentioned breaker bar and big hammer on my study engine which worked too. I think the breaker bar and screaming with a hammer has it's own risks to one's knuckles and a potential crossthreading and stripping of threads.
 

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Just use a penny to jam the clutch gear on the front. The soft copper wont hurt anything and you can get the flywheel off easily.
 

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Do NOT, I repeat, NOT use an Impact Wrench to do this job.



I have seen what can happen if the wrench over-torques.

You can strip out the bolt AND the threads on the flywheel, then you are completely f***ed.




How about Don't be stupid while using an impact wrench. All you're looking for is half a turn and the hammer knocking action of the impact.
 

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Stitch, You may not know until it is too late.



The best method that I have seen in removing the flywheel is to have the T-handle Honda tool and a dead-blow brass hammer.

You tighten the T-handle until it hits and turns the flywheel assembly. Hit the top of the tool with the hammer, then hit one of the arms of the "T"

Repeat until the flywheel loosens up.



I learned this method from my mechanic, after nearly popping a vein in my head using the strap wrench / socket method.



It took him 30 seconds to get the flywheel off after I had been struggling for days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I appreciate all of the counsel. I also appreciate the brotherhood - clearly I am not the only one having had difficulty with the flywheel.



Thanks.



STAN
 

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Half the battle on repairing any mechanical device is taking things apart and 1/4 of the battle is putting it together. The corollary questions are how tight is tight, how tight is snug, and how much can you reef, yank, beat on something to get it apart.



Decades ago, I was a TV & appliance repairman and I still do it a little bit on the side. People tell me how easy I make it look. Well lemme tell ya I've stripped about 95% of the bolts that I'll ever strip and I've repaired about 95% of all the appliance models that have ever been made. Now I know which ones can take a beating or need a beating to get them apart. And I know which ones you have to be delicate with and coax apart. And I know a few things that only come apart with hundreds of blows with a 4-lb sledge hammer. Nowadays, I rarely strip out bolts. Well pretty rarely. Okay, I know how to quickly fix a bolt I stripped out because I've become an expert with Heli-coils and other assorted RX.



The biggest problem with 99% of all repair manuals is they don't cover what to do when things don't come apart. Yes, the most important thing is not mentioned. I have a squeaky pro-link on one of my GL500's and as every Silverwing owner who's done it knows, it's not easy fixing the squeak. The only reason it's not easy is that the parts don't come apart. At least they don't come apart like the manual implies ...... "Remove bolts A and B and the entire linkage falls out gently into your waiting hands." Rrrrrrright.
 

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Hi all - I've literally just done this job to get at my camchain (see the Oh Dear thresd!). Following advice on that thread regarding the Honda puller I bought an 80mm long m20 x 1.5 (fine thread pitch) bolt for a few sheckles and it worked a treat - once the rotor bolt was off just screw in the m20 bolt until it stops and hit the bolt head with your favourite mallet. My flywheel popped in seconds without any need to lock the crank. Ebay is a ready source of the correct sized bolt.



Cheers



Darren
 

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This is a GL1000 Oil filter bolt.. Not sure of the size of the CX bolt might be same but shorter.. Popped right off with slap on a 1/2 inch rachet



Hi all - I've literally just done this job to get at my camchain (see the Oh Dear thresd!). Following advice on that thread regarding the Honda puller I bought an 80mm long m20 x 1.5 (fine thread pitch) bolt for a few sheckles and it worked a treat - once the rotor bolt was off just screw in the m20 bolt until it stops and hit the bolt head with your favourite mallet. My flywheel popped in seconds without any need to lock the crank. Ebay is a ready source of the correct sized bolt.



Cheers



Darren
 

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I've found that sometimes you can be tightening and belting on the removal bolt with no sign of anything budging, only to find that if I put my fingers behind the rotor [and starter gear] that they simply pull off.



The reason being that the rotor quietly popped off without it being noticed, the removal bolt has gone to the end of the thread in the rotor and will move no more, and the woodruff key is preventing the rotor from turning on the crank.



An occasional backward tug on the rotor and starter gear doesn't hurt.
 

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How about Don't be stupid while using an impact wrench. All you're looking for is half a turn and the hammer knocking action of the impact.
I have used a 1/2 inch impact that has 600 foot pound of torque capability but I lower the air pressure at the compressor until it is not hammering at all. Then I slowly increase the pressure and it eventually hammers the nut loose without damage. On smaller nuts and bolts I do the same thing with my cordless drill by letting the clutch do the hammering.

BillRod
 
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