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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen a few post asking about plastic repairs, but no one has shown how to do it. So with some pictures I took a couple months ago while working on Doug's bike, I'll show you what I do and how it works.



Excuse some of the pictures as they came out a bit fuzzy. I should have set up the tripod.



A couple years ago Dave told me about PlastiFix. I was a bit reluctant but with his recommending it I figured I would give it a shot. To my amazement it worked fantastic. Not to mention how easy it is to use. On all the hard plastic parts on our bikes, this stuff makes a permanent and very strong repair that won't break off. And as you will see it can be ground down and sanded. The only parts I have not been able to repair are front and rear fenders, the gray plastic type, and the speedometer shades for the GL's. That's a different type of plastic.

PlastiFix is a 2 part process. Powder that is canalized with a liquid hardener.



Here is a side cover from a GL650I with a broken tab. Rare, but it happens. If you still have the broken tab you can skip the molding process and go right to bonding it back on.



In the kit comes a couple blue blocks that are used to form new parts from an existing good one. The best way to get this stuff soft and pliable it to put it in a microwave floating in water. Bring it to a boil and let it sit for a couple minutes.



Now press the molding plastic around the good piece that your going to duplicate. It needs to be pressed tightly so it gets into every shape of what its trying to copy. If you have thin skin you may want to where gloves. Remember that this stuff just came out of boiling water.



After it cools down a while so it will hold it's shape it can be removed. I cut this one down one side so it would be easier to get the part out that I intend to make.



In this example I taped the gap shut tightly so the part comes out as precise as possible.



Now your ready to start making the part. I prefer putting a few drops of hardener in the mold first and then add a little powder so it's a thick consistency. Too thin and it will take several hours to cure hard. Then add more powder and hardener as many times as it takes to fill your mold. Sorry no pictures here. You don't want to wait too long between additions of the mixture. Do it quickly so that each fill will bond to the previous one. Don't attempt to fill the entire mold with powder and then fill it up with hardener. You may end up with dry spots inside it.



I made my mold a bit longer than I needed it so I could grind it down to the exact length I needed when it was cured. But here is the finished part after I let it sit in the mold for about a half hour. It will still be soft when you do the molds this way. So don't rush it. Let it cure until it's all the way hardened. Then you can shape it to fit.



Now when you have the part ready and shaped the way you want it, file the edge of it so it has a bit of a groove around it. Now, put a small amount of powder on the spot where your going to attach the part to. A small mound will do here. Then put a few drops of hardener in the powder. Not too much. You don't want it runny. Then press the new part down in place and let it sit until it's cured. You have very little time to position it. Before it gets too hard though you'll want to fill any low areas that need to be built up. Remember to do this while the first batch is still soft so it bonds to each other. You can always add more later while your shaping it. Just sand it down a bit so it has a rough surface to bond to.



Sorry I didn't get a picture of it after it was all sanded down and smoothed off. But depending on where the repair is and what you want it to look like will determine the finish. I sanded this one down with 220 and 320 grit sand paper to do the final finish.

Had I known the white powder ends up looking much like the plastic of the side cover I would have used that on the repair.



Now for repairing cracks it's much of the same. For this side cover I didn't want to paint it so I aligned the crack up with blocks of stirring sticks and vice grips so it would hold it in perfectly while the mix cured.

Just grind a groove on the back side of the cover without going through to the paint. I use a dremel style diamond shaped burr most of the time for my repairs. It does a good job of roughing the surface and widening the bonding area.



Then you can fill the groove with the powder and hardener or premix it first and press it into it as a paste. Either way works well. This one I tried to spread evenly without to much success. It started hardening before I got to it. That's ok though. It can be sanded smooth.

 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I had to break this up in two sections because I had too many pictures in the first one.





If your wondering how durable this stuff is, then take a look at my confidence in it. I customized the left side cover of my current CX500 project so that it looks just like the right side. If it didn't work well I wouldn't be risking what will end up being an expensive custom paint job on the bike.

I simply cut out the section from a spare right side cover and shaped it till it fit in place where I cut out the rectangle area and glued it in. By the way, this was done in the white powder mix.



Then when the mix was cured I sanded down the new addition until it blended in to the existing panel. As you can see on the back side I used a small grinder to smooth out the finished area.



After all the sanding and shaping this is what it turned out looking like with a couple coats of high build primer on it.





Trust me this PlastiFix really works. Chips and scratches can be filled just like you were using body filler. But with this stuff it will be permanent. You can even make custom parts with it. That's a future plan of mine for making molded in turn signals for a 78 style maggot front fairing assembly. But that's down the road a ways.

Enjoy the possibilities and trust that it works.

Larry
 

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Thanks for posting that Larry.

I have a plastifix kit ready to use this fall to fix a GL rear cowl and some speaker mounts in the fairing of my Valkyrie. Your hints will be useful.

Joe
 

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I have had excellent results with Plastex, evidently a similar product. It will also mold parts. After several attempts at gluing the rear tab, finally used Plastex and it is still fine after many years. At the same time, I found that, after removing the rubber grommet, that the welding around that hole was pretty rough, so I dressed it with a rat tail file. I think that certainly aggravated the right rear "broken tab" syndrome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's a very good idea Len. It is probably the reason for many ripped grommets.

The Plastex also appears to be much cheaper. If it weren't for the fact I just bought the Pro kit from PlastiFix, I would give them a try.
 

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It appears that the Plastex kit has a smaller amount of product than the Plastifix kit. When taking that into consideration it seems the Plastifix is a better deal? They both are being sold on ebay which is where I am making the comparisons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Good catch Wayne. I was just judging it by the size of the bottles.
 
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