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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was scanning through the Common Service Manual and ran across this page...







Does that mean an oil seal like Final Shaft oil seal, Camshaft oil seal (at tach), Water Pump oil seal... for example

I know those seals are 3-sided with a spring in the middle...



In my mind's eye I can imagine packing that with grease would preserve the seal/spring better than just engine oil perhaps, but I don't know.
 

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I always coat the sealing surface of all seals with grease, and smear some on the shaft mating surface too. It is to prevent seal damage during shaft installation and initial run in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I did that for all the seals, but I didn't think/know to PACK the seal with grease.

I'm sure the seals will function just fine without packing, but I wanted to see what you all do during install.



Simply conversation at this point for me, but maybe it would help someone next time their engine is apart.
 

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That's old info, not many people pack grease in seals anymore. The materials technology for the seals have improved in the last couple decades, a very thin film of oil is all that's recommended by the manufacturers. That being said, I don't see a problem with using a bit of grease, although I wouldn't overdue it, and ALWAYS double check the dimensions, slabbing grease on the seal can make a too small seal feel right when you're pushing it in.



The only problems I've seen mentioned in regard to packing seals with grease was in some of the automotive tech magazines. Over time the grease on the seals would get a bit hardened and waxy, the grease barrier would cause the seal to dry up (the grease and buildup would act as a seal.) That was fine as long as the grease and buildup were intact, but if an oil flush, high detergent oil or even synthetic were introduced, it would clean away the waxy grease film, and the oil would get to the seals, which were dried up. That's why all the horror stories of engines used to only dino juice sprouting leaks after a switch to synthetic or an oil system flush.



I've always installed dry or with a thin film of oil, never a problem. What you should always check for is a ridge or worn area on the shaft of what you're sealing. Sometimes the seal will wear a ridge on the shaft, if you install the new seal in the same spot, you may get a leak, insert the new seal so the lip doesn't ride in the ridge.
 
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