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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,



I just recently bought my 1979 CX500C & was preparing to change the oil tonight. When I looked down there it looked like there was a thick type of sealant around the plug. After I cut through the "rubber cement", a pretty bad little oil leak started (Probably a drop every 10-20 seconds). I continued to unscrew the plug and drained the oil. There was some sealant inside the hole as well. My guess was the PO stripped the plug and put some sealant in there to try and hold everything in?



My question is.. is fixing this problem going to be worth the bike? I was planning on calling some motorcycle shops tomorrow and see what they had to say. I'm pretty bummed as the PO completely failed to mention this little surprise to me. Not to mention the oil looked like it hadn't been changed in forever.



Hope to hear some input. Thanks for reading guys.
 

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The oil probably hadn't been changed because the P.O. knew he would run into the problem you now have.



Actually you can replace the front engine cover, it is not a real hard job to do and covers can be found without too much trouble,,ebay or post an ad here in the buying and selling forum.
 

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Hey everyone,



I just recently bought my 1979 CX500C & was preparing to change the oil tonight. When I looked down there it looked like there was a thick type of sealant around the plug. After I cut through the "rubber cement", a pretty bad little oil leak started (Probably a drop every 10-20 seconds). I continued to unscrew the plug and drained the oil. There was some sealant inside the hole as well. My guess was the PO stripped the plug and put some sealant in there to try and hold everything in?



My question is.. is fixing this problem going to be worth the bike? I was planning on calling some motorcycle shops tomorrow and see what they had to say. I'm pretty bummed as the PO completely failed to mention this little surprise to me. Not to mention the oil looked like it hadn't been changed in forever.



Hope to hear some input. Thanks for reading guys.
Or just get a helicoil and insert it in there.

Capt Frank
 

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Normally I would say replace the front engine cover.It's a middle sized job but a larger job if,as I suspect,you are new to home motorcycle mechanics.Do NOT take it to a shop as most times they won't want to work on these old bikes and with a little help from the contributors on here you can do a better job than they would in most cases and way cheaper




There's always plenty front covers on Ebay at varying prices,



http://shop.ebay.com/i.html?_from=R...w=cx500+front+cover&_sacat=See-All-Categories



You can use a CX or GL500 they are the same.



However for now I say you should get some JB weld or similar and re-do the hack/bodge and plan for the proper job for later in the year when the riding season dies off.Then we can mentor you through it and you can clean your oil pump strainer and sump as well at the same time




Total cost most times one Front engine cover gasket or make your own,



http://globalcxglvtwins.hostingdelivered.com/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=256



To give yourself confidence that you can do this job service your Starter motor,



http://globalcxglvtwins.hostingdelivered.com/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=208



Several people who have never done any work on these motorcycles have done the Starter 1st job/training thing and then gone on to tackle bigger jobs like even changing the Cam-chain






Remember there's always some one around here 24/7/365 across the World to help
 

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While you'll always get a handfull of opinions and options when asking a question on this site, in the end it will be your decision. I had to helicoil an older car that I stripped the oil drain plug on...actually, not the plug, but the oil pan housing. The kit I bought had good instructions and the repair was done in about 10 minutes. Got me on the road pretty quick. This may be an easier way to accomplish success and get you riding quicker.
 

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The reason I've not endorsed heli-coiling in this post is that the poster seems a little new to home mechanics and also if not used to using a helicoil could introduce damaging swarf into the engine.

I personally would not heli-coil one of these front engine covers and would just get a 2nd hand one as they are plentiful if it needed this kind of repair.Also that area may well be compromised by over-torquing.



I try to err on the side of safety especially where a poster my not be proficient.
 

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I have a front cover here and looking at it I reckon

a helicoil is probably the best option if you're removing the cover anyway.

If anyone had reservations about doing it themselves, I'm sure a shop would

do it for a small fee if you took it in to them.



I didnt have any 10x1.25 helicoils for the engine hanger studs

and took the whole engine down to a local engineering shop in my van who

came outside and did it for me in 5 minutes and only charged me a few quid.
 

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Not sure what the thread size is for the oil plug, but another option is to get one for another bike/car the next size up and simply tap the hole. I think myself I would do this once the season was done, and in the iterim would Shep suggested and JB weld it back in (try not to get any inside) until your ready. Changing the cover for a replacement would be the best bet, but if you cant get one (or one for a good price) I think rethreading a size up (probably an imperial thread) would be the fastest (but still needs to be done with the cover OFF the engine).
 

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Its a 10mm thread

you could drill and tap a 6 or even 8mm thread in the current bolt

so wif you JB weld it back in you still have an option to drain the oil.

Mind you, most epoxys wont take to an oily surface so it must be

very very clean and oil free to get a good bond.



Retapping the cover by hand could be tricky as the current thread

is partially cut in the bottom inner face of the cover and this

could easily throw a drill and tap off centre
 

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Not sure what the thread size is for the oil plug, but another option is to get one for another bike/car the next size up and simply tap the hole. I think myself I would do this once the season was done, and in the iterim would Shep suggested and JB weld it back in (try not to get any inside) until your ready. Changing the cover for a replacement would be the best bet, but if you cant get one (or one for a good price) I think rethreading a size up (probably an imperial thread) would be the fastest (but still needs to be done with the cover OFF the engine).




I'll just add the cover should be off because of the metal chips that will get into the engine during this process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the replies everyone! I really appreciate it.



I took the plug to autozone just to see what they had to say earlier before I read this thread. He said my best bets were to goto Honda and request an oversized plug and basically retap the hole, or, utilize these little plastic washer things + some thread repair tape and see if it fixes the problem. I went with the latter and sealed it back up. There's still a very slight leakage but it's much less severe than before. I'm planning on using some of that JB Weld to temporarily patch up the small leak and eventually take the cover off as suggested earlier.



Again, I really appreciate the help and suggestions guys. I'm definitely not mechanically inclined and this whole process is a (fun) learning experience. I'm excited to get her running smoothly. Next step is bleeding the brakes!



Matt
 

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Thanks for all the replies everyone! I really appreciate it.



I took the plug to autozone just to see what they had to say earlier before I read this thread. He said my best bets were to goto Honda and request an oversized plug and basically retap the hole, or, utilize these little plastic washer things + some thread repair tape and see if it fixes the problem. I went with the latter and sealed it back up. There's still a very slight leakage but it's much less severe than before. I'm planning on using some of that JB Weld to temporarily patch up the small leak and eventually take the cover off as suggested earlier.



Again, I really appreciate the help and suggestions guys. I'm definitely not mechanically inclined and this whole process is a (fun) learning experience. I'm excited to get her running smoothly. Next step is bleeding the brakes!



Matt




Matt



Good going on getting the plug temporally back in the engine!



When you're bleeding the brakes, make sure you close the bleeder each time before you let go of the brake lever. If you don't, air will be drawn into the system through the bleeder.



Good luck!
 

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You could also try a "piggyback" plug, they're pretty much a given on certain types of cars with badly designed and executed oil pans.



Piggy back plugs are oversize and self tapping, when you screw it in, it cuts the existing threads oversize. The large main plug stays with the engine after install, and the oil is drained thru the smaller secondary plug in the middle.









I have never had the need to use one on a CX, but I don't see any reason it wouldn't work.
 

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You could also try a "piggyback" plug, they're pretty much a given on certain types of cars with badly designed and executed oil pans.



Piggy back plugs are oversize and self tapping, when you screw it in, it cuts the existing threads oversize. The large main plug stays with the engine after install, and the oil is drained thru the smaller secondary plug in the middle.



I have never had the need to use one on a CX, but I don't see any reason it wouldn't work.


Neat one for sure. If you do go this route, I think you would still need to have the cover off so you can ensure chips do not get into the motor. There are a lot of things you can do too as far as inspection goes when you have the front cover off as well with the oil pump, sump, screen, you can polish the clutch cover, etc.
 

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When you bleed your brakes, I would bleed all the old stuff out so you get clean fluid throughout. Also, I picked up a bleeder kit from an auto store, really cheap (about $5.00), which allows you to bleed them without a second person to assist. Its just a small plastic bottle with a line and check valve to stop air from getting back in. With this little cheepie I can bleed the brakes in only a few min, and it makes things a little bit less meessy too lol
 

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Have we determined that the fault lies in the fact that a thread has actually stripped?

The OP only states; " My guess was the PO stripped the plug"



I`ve seen a couple of front engine covers that leaked oil because there was a crack in the casing on the underneath of the drain plug hole..
 

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Have we determined that the fault lies in the fact that a thread has actually stripped?

The OP only states; " My guess was the PO stripped the plug"



I`ve seen a couple of front engine covers that leaked oil because there was a crack in the casing on the underneath of the drain plug hole..


Very good point, if this is the case, an oversize will make things worse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I was concerned about a crack in the casing too. But, after I took the plug out and let most of the oil drain I stuck my finger in the hole to plug it up and the leak stopped. Not too eloquent, but it seemed to point towards the stripped threads as the culprit.



Also, I picked up this one man brake bleeder kit from Autozone a few days ago. It doesn't specify a one way valve now that I look at it so I guess I'll just have to do the open, pull in, close, let out way.



Thanks !
 

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Yea, thats the one I have, and after looking at it, mine doesnt have a valve either. Seems that as long as itshigher than the fitting it prevents air from getting in, allowing you to just keep pumping the brake until it runs clear and air free (just make sure you keep an eye on the MC level and keep topping it up so air doesnt get in from the MC. I am pretty sure you can just pump the brake to bleed without having to push in, close, release brake, for as long as no air gets in the bleed fitting, only a small amount of fluid is pulled back as compared to what is pushed out. Key is to keep air out.
 

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Let's take the brake things to a different thread, it's not belonging in this topic.



MHO
 
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