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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read there are 4 points that might be the cause of such a leak: the cam seal, the tach drive seal, the O ring on the main oil gallery behind the cam holder and the gasket behind the cam holder. Can they all be fixed with the engine in?
 

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I'd advise not to tackle that tach drive seal unless thats where your leak is coming from....
(bit of a "bugger" to do.)
if its not leaking and you decide to "leak-proof it" just in case...some sealant(applied at the outside) at the tach cable housing entry is a option.....
 

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1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
All I needed to hear. Anyone recognize this pattern?
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I couldn't find any obvious leak. Cam seal and the tach cable seal look good which I understand to mean that either the gasket or O-ring under the cam cover is the problem. Gasket looks newish as it should and I gotta think I changed the O-ring while the engine was on the bench for a triple, etc. near 1,000 miles or so ago. What I ended up doing was re-torqueing the cover bolts. One was loose, like a full turn maybe more, hoping it's not stripped. I got it to 9 ftlbs but it seemed awfully slow and sticky getting there.
What got me into this was installing a replacement tach. The cable had been disconnected from the broken tach for about a year and it must have rusted. I know the visible end had. Notice the red goo coming out from the open end where the cable locking screw goes:
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I do believe that is the result of absentmindedly dripping an abundance of 3-in-One oil down the cable while observing the end of the clutch cable for signs of lubricant. The reason I mention this is because when I went to unscrew the screw it came out almost effortlessly, leading me to think that it it might be advisable to throw some PB Blaster or the like down the cable sheath before attempting to remove the screw.
The fan shows signs of throwing oil but the build up on the blades could have been there for ages:
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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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I wouldn't put any penetrant down a cable I wanted to use again. Some of them have liners that can be harmed by some chemicals and some penetrants contain acids that could damage the inner cable.
I'd expect that you had the screw for the cable out when you replaced the gasket and I wouldn't think it would be hard to remove again that soon.

Hopefully the loose screw was the cause of your leak. Then again, maybe the leak was the oil you poured into the cable flushing out the dirty old stuff.

As for me not saying anything before, the shortest answer has no characters (how's that for Zen?).
 

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1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
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I've used penetrants to free up stuck cables. Followed by an excessive dose of a proper cable lube, I've had no subsequent problems.
 

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I'm with Bob on this one. I've seen synthetic lined cables 'sieze' when the wrong lubricant or cleaner is applied. The liner either swells or becomes gummy.

Mineral oil is another nono.
 
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