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The next thing I need to learn to do on my own is change my own oil. The last step-by-step instructions that I was given on this forum went so well that I am ready to learn this now. It will save me money because the cycle shops clean house on these oil changes. Will someone post some idiot-proof instructions on oil changing with pics if possible?
 

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It's pretty simple really. Just get a catch pan that will hold a gallon or so. Put the bike on its center stand and start the bike up. Get it to normal operating temperature. Then turn off the engine and depending on your tolerance for hot things,wait a couple of minutes for things to cool down, then remove the drain plug on the engine front sump. Use a six point socket on this and the oil filter bolt if you can. That will prevent rounding off the corners.



Allow all the oil to drain from the engine, down to a drop or two a minute. Then put the plug back in, and remove the oil filter bolt. Have the catch pan under the filter. When it comes out, there should be a spring, then a washer, then the oil filter. Don't lose the washer, it likes to stick to the filter end. Put a new filter and O rings on the cover and tighten back up. I don't know the torque, but don't over do it.



Refill the engine thru the dipstick hole, using the correct amount and then start the engine. Just let it idle until the oil light goes out. Then recheck the oil level using the dipstick. It should read full.



Thats it. Should take about 20 minutes.
 

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i am willing to bet that before i get the pics uploaded some one will already tell you how to do it





but any way under the oil filter cover (below it) there is a bolt biggest bolt on the front cover its on the bottom left (sitting on bike) take that off and let the oil drain out



after that is done take off the oil filter cover round thing with fins be careful there is a spring that likes to fly away now replace oil filter with a new one and reinstall the cover and put oil back in the bike and pat your self on the back and open a cold beer for you have just done a oil change on your motorcycle
 

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If you have started up the engine then the exhaust pipes will be very hot.



Be extremely careful when loosening the oil filter bolt and oil drain bolt - when they break free, your arm may travel up against the hot exhaust pipe. I once experienced a 2nd degree burn this way. (Only once - I learned this lesson very well.)
 

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What I do, after a brief 'warm up' period......





1) Undo and remove the oil drain plug - left lower front side of the engine (beside the oil filter cover)

Allow to drain completely. Be careful not to let it drop into your drain pan, Also, there is a washer on the drain plug - don't loose it either.

2) undo the oil filter cover slowly. once free, remove carefully - there is a sping, washer, and of course the filter inside.

3) allow the engine to drain completely - this is usually quicker if you've warmed the engine up, slower if it's a cold engine.

4) replace the drain plug - be careful not to over tighten - I've seen the front engine cover 'crack' due to being over tightened.

5) Replace o-rings in filter cover Large on the face that attaches to engine, and small one on the Bolt/filter pipe - near the

top of the filter cover. You will see it if you've completely disassembled the filter cover from the bolt.



(pic of bolt/filter pipe)

6) Reassemble the cover - Place bolt (with new o-ring) through cover... put spring onto shaft, then washer, then filter



7) screw filter assembly back onto engine, and tighten according to spec.

8) refill engine with oil through the hole where the dipstick is - have 4 litres (quarts) ready, but you will likely need only 3 and then some.

9) Once you have put in 3 litres, replace the dipstick, and run the engine. This will make sure that the filter has been 're-filled' with oil.

10) Stop the engine, and recheck the oil level. Do this, as mentioned above - remove the dipstick, dry it off, then re-insert it without turning it. Do NOT thread it in. The proper measure is with the dipstick just sitting in the hole.

Add more oil as required until it is above the 'bottom line', but below the 'full line'. (there is a cross hatched pattern between the top and bottom lines)
 

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ok damn that is one hell of a write up there cx i wish i could give you more than a + 1 on that
 

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i wish i had a job that i could just sit on the comp and help people on here (hell i just wish i had a job but i am now a stay at home dad and loving it)
 
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i wish i had a job that i could just sit on the comp and help people on here (hell i just wish i had a job but i am now a stay at home dad and loving it)




Wish I had a 'stay at home kid' but now she's 15, and I'll need a leash! (Don't get me started!!!)
 

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What are the repercussions for not having that washer? One of my bikes is missing it.



Also, I just changed to Rotella T6 syth. Much better cold weather shifting, and the motor sounds quieter overall.
 

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I believe the washer is there to keep the spring from gouging into the rubber end of the oil filter during installation and use. It is not a "have to be a perfect size" washer. Any reasonable close one will work. You may be able to find a suitable one at a hardware store, or a automotive parts store. Ask about a oil pan drain washer at the parts store. Some of them come close to being right.
 

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When I first got my bike I didn't have that washer for about a year...the spring still held the filter in place and did no damage to it at all......I have a the washer now though just for good measure.



I CAN'T believe that none of you guys mentioned to crank the starter (with the kill switch set to KILL) after most of the oil has drained out to get as much more out as possible. I think the manual says to do this...I do.
 

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I CAN'T believe that none of you guys mentioned to crank the starter (with the kill switch set to KILL) after most of the oil has drained out to get as much more out as possible. I think the manual says to do this...I do.


I'm sure it wouldn't do any damage - with the kill switch in off position, but I just have a hard time with turning over the engine with no oil - even if only for a moment, on the starter. Back in the day they advised that the oil filter need only be changed every 2nd or 3rd oil change (on car engines at the 'fast lube places') Now we do it as a matter of course. However, the amount of pressure developed only by the starter motor I think would be insignificant to 'pump' more oil through the system. You get more benefit from 'pre-warming' the engine - prior to the oil change, as it flows better when warm. I'll look it up though, because in the back of my mind, I seem to remember doing just that - back in the '80's
 

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I just looked and the manual does say to do that......however I see your point as well, whenever I've done this it's maybe gotten another couple drops of oil out and that's it.
 

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I'm not sure about that 'cranking with kill switch set to stop to get more oil out' tip

and wouldnt bother myself.

You'll never get ALL the oil out and dont need to really, unless its contaminated

with nasties and thats a different issue.



The above tips say it all really. I'll just add that when I give it fresh oil and filter

I always take the plugs out and crank until the oil light goes out to prime the system

before starting.

After I refit the plugs and its settled a bit, I do a quick level check prior to

starting in anger.

I then do the run and check test, but find I seldom need to add much,if any



Oh and one other

Check for leaks !
 

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I understand the reason to warm the engine so that the oil will be thin and drain more completely. I assume that if I ride my bike in one evening and put it on the stand and then come back the next morning that the oil has had twelve hours to drain as much as possible into the crankcase. Why warm the bike up before draining in this case?
 

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Actually it's more than just causing the oil to drain quicker. If the bike has been recently run some of the sludge and particles will loosen and still be in suspension in the oil.
 

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Actually it's more than just causing the oil to drain quicker. If the bike has been recently run some of the sludge and particles will loosen and still be in suspension in the oil.


What he said... an even better idea would be to park the bike after a run at night, open up the drain, remove the filter cover, and let it sit overnight drainging pretty much everything out of it by morning. But as mentioned, the few drops extra are of little concern to the more important "Do regular oil changes" either seasonally, or at least every 5,000 miles.
 
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