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Oil additives

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you put in oil additives if so what ones?

I was thinking of adding Slick 50 thinking that its a 1982 engine with 44,000 it might need a little help.
 

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First poll of the new forum?
 

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I would highly recommend NOT using any oil additives.



Todays motor oils and their additives are like a fine cake recepie. Once you get all the ingredients balanced correctly, adding 4 more cups of sugar/flour whatever isn't going to improve the mix.



As for Slick 50, pure snake oil, there are better ways to piss away your money.
 

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I would highly recommend NOT using any oil additives.



Todays motor oils and their additives are like a fine cake recepie. Once you get all the ingredients balanced correctly, adding 4 more cups of sugar/flour whatever isn't going to improve the mix.



As for Slick 50, pure snake oil, there are better ways to piss away your money.


The snake oil is a good one and appropriate for that product(snake oil).
 

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Do you put in oil additives if so what ones?

I was thinking of adding Slick 50 thinking that its a 1982 engine with 44,000 it might need a little help.




If you ever want your clutch to work again, I'd strongly advise against slick-50. Clutch shares oil with the engine.
 

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I was thinking of adding Slick 50 thinking that its a 1982 engine with 44,000 it might need a little help.


Absolutely not! Regular Slick 50 is not compatible with a wet clutch. You're not asking just to get a rise out of us are you?



Actually, I would avoid oils that contain high levels of moly too. It's a metal, friction modifier that Honda does not recommend using in certain models. Again, we're talking about the CX, so not a lot of power through the clutch plates anyway.



Shep, how do you know how much concentration you are adding? Why do you add when most oils have some concentration of molybdenum already? Just wondering.
 

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Absolutely not! Regular Slick 50 is not compatible with a wet clutch. You're not asking just to get a rise out of us are you?



Actually, I would avoid oils that contain high levels of moly too. It's a metal, friction modifier that Honda does not recommend using in certain models. Again, we're talking about the CX, so not a lot of power through the clutch plates anyway.



Shep, how do you know how much concentration you are adding? Why do you add when most oils have some concentration of molybdenum already? Just wondering.
I don't run any additives. However, GM EOS is a good additive for older engines. It replaces the zinc high-pressure additives that were removed in newer oils. Cars and bikes with flat tappet cams (like ours) still need the zinc.
 

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Shep, how do you know how much concentration you are adding? Why do you add when most oils have some concentration of molybdenum already? Just wondering.


The product I use,"Molyslip",



Recommends 10 ml per 100 CC so I just add 50 ml per oil change and a little to my drive box.As I use Moly based products like Molypaste when re-building cranks/Cam-shafts I figure it does no harm and can help with older engine parts like the bores/gears on my engines which are made from very very high mileage parts.

I cannot attest to it's claims over the years but it may well be a contributory factor to my,"Quiet" engines,



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcu3veeQolo



http://www.pdsrecording.site90.com/cxgl500/noises.htm



As it only adheres to metallic parts I never get any clutch slip.Molybdenum Disulphide has known incredible properties,



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molybdenum_disulfide



and is used in Industry even in ,"Dry form" as a lubricant in 24/7/365 pumps etc.



Years ago,when I had an old Norton 500cc,a large stone flipped up off my front wheel and cracked my crank case and dumped all the oil.I should have wheeled the bike home the 1/2 a mile but carefully low rev road the bike back and when I stripped the engine the bearings were fine.I put it down to the fact I always run on moly and that it saved the engine.As this is anecdotal I cannot prove this was the case but the engine was still good when I sold the bike some years later,one of the worst sales in my life
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Absolutely not! Regular Slick 50 is not compatible with a wet clutch. You're not asking just to get a rise out of us are you?
Why do you think this? it was a question so I understand more, thought that was what this site is about......
 

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Why do you think this? it was a question so I understand more, thought that was what this site is about......




Certainly questions are welcome!



I This has been discussed a lot before, but with the old forums gone, I imagine we will talk about it a lot again. As was stated before, with a wet clutch, certain friction modifiers can cause slippage and other problems. If I recall correctly, you should look for oils that are "JATO" certified, or something like that. As far as modifiers, I also have a question.



I was reading the SeaFoam can, and while I have used it as a fuel additive, it also states it can be used in the crankcase oil. Anyone done this?



Mike
 

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I was reading the SeaFoam can, and while I have used it as a fuel additive, it also states it can be used in the crankcase oil. Anyone done this?



Mike


I've seen this posted as an,"Engine Flush" having ruined an engine using a so called,"Engine Flush" I would never add anything that would thin the oil.Old engines build deposits around the big-end shells.If these are removed,and as I found to my cost,it can cause catastrophic engine failure.

If I want to flush and engine now I just use cheap 20w50,run for say 50 miles then change back to my proper oil.This is a safe way to have a clean through but nothing beats a partial strip down and manual sump and oil pump strainer clean.
 

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Absolutely not! Regular Slick 50 is not compatible with a wet clutch. You're not asking just to get a rise out of us are you?


Chaz UK: The issue is that Slick 50 contains teflon (PTFE), which is really good at making things -- like your wet clutch -- slip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Chaz UK: The issue is that Slick 50 contains teflon (PTFE), which is really good at making things -- like your wet clutch -- slip.


So great for a dry clutch then like in the car. well so far it look like Not to add anything.

Was asking as I am about to do a oil change Got new filter and o rings just need to get the oil now.
 

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So great for a dry clutch then like in the car. well so far it look like Not to add anything.

Was asking as I am about to do a oil change Got new filter and o rings just need to get the oil now.
Slick 50 is not great for anything.
 

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Slick 50 no longer advertises that is uses Teflon as Dupont made them quit. Dupont says that for Teflon to bond to metal (which Slick 50 claims) the metal needs to be surgically clean and the temperatures have to be in excess of 700 degrees F. Neither of these conditions exist in a internal combustion engine.
 
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