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Anything else you suggest I try? Lol
I think someone already mentioned putting the sensor in boiling water. Plain water will always boil at 100c/212f unless you are at an altitude significantly higher or lower than sea level and will not exceed that temperature unless in a closed container where pressure can build up.

You would need to remove the sender from the bike and connect it to the bike with wires and put a container of water on a hot plate or camp stove near the bike
 

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Thanks for pointing that out. Attached is what it looks like with the probe in. You can see that it doesnt go as deep as the original.

Are you thinking this could be a big contributor to an inaccurate reading?

Any suggestions how I can extend it?
I have seen water systems not read as well. Also, if you get lazy keeping the water system clean with the antifreeze. It will collect particles around the cavity and insulate it. That can also change the reading later on. So, I would not be comfortable with it. No suggestions on making it longer.
 

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Water pipe threads are tapered so that they seal better. You might be able to run a tap into the adapter to open the threads up a bit so the sender can go farther into it. If you try this do it in small steps so that you don't make the hole too loose.

But if the gauge is reading high I doubt if that would make much difference.
 

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Water pipe threads are tapered so that they seal better. You might be able to run a tap into the adapter to open the threads up a bit so the sender can go farther into it. If you try this do it in small steps so that you don't make the hole too loose.

But if the gauge is reading high I doubt if that would make much difference.
Very good thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
While researching on different gauge options, i found an article online about installation of a Equus 6262 gauge onto a snowmobile.

It mentions to not apply Teflon tape to the threads of the sending unit as it will affect grounding.

I have Teflon tape on my sender. I'm going to get rid of the Teflon and if it still fails, I'm going to buy a new gauge.
 

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I used to have an Equus temp gauge on Eccles years ago (not sure the model number). Its sender was close to the same diameter as the original one but NPT instead of the metric pipe thread Honda used so I ran the appropriate tap into the original hole. I used T tape with it because of the not perfect threads and it worked OK.

If you are concerned that the T tape may be causing problems connect one end of a wire to the thermostat housing and wrap the other end around the outer part of the sender so that it makes good contact and see if it makes any difference. If it does you can make up something more permanent to ground it reliably.
 

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So I have almost the same set up in terms of an aftermarket temp guage and sender (Eqeuus guage).

I have noted in this thread that forum members indicated that normal operating temp is between 80 and 110C (degrees Celcius) - Thanx

On Sunday, which was a fairly hot Summers day here in SA, my bike ran mostly on 80C - 90C...which I thought was perfectly fine and normal.

When I hit the freeway, on my way home, I ran mostly at 120Km/h and now and again at 130Km/h. Now normally, on the freeway, a bike would run cooler than in stop go traffic/situation.

But My bike temp...or guage...then went steadily up to about 110C...and from there..almost wanting to still go a little higher..ever so slightly. I was concerned about this.

Are we saying this is normal temp?
Why would my bike run hotter in 5th gear on the freeway, at 120 Km/h with all that extra wind on the rad?
I did about a distance of 35km on the freeway..give or take...

It felt as if the temp would increase even more if I had continued on the freeway..

Coolant is brand new, and when I got back home I double checked: The fan is working fine (turning with the engin and turn faster as revs go up...so its not busted. And also, def still no coolant leaks.

My concerns are:
110C seems very high as a normal temp.
Why would my bike run hotter on the highway as oppose to normal roads? (I get that revs are obviously higher on the freeway..but this is not the case in cars and my other bikes / modern bikes)

Your wisdom please?
 

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One fault I can think of that will make the bike run hot at higher speeds is fuel mixture. Maybe you need to go up a jet size on the secondary. Lean mixes burn hotter.

You could do a plug chop at the questioned speed and check your plug colour.
 

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Noted thanx Phreak.
About the fuel mixture: (In SA we only have Unleaded 93 octane and then 95 available)
I am currently using unleaded 93. Would it help / differ to try 95..and see if there is a difference?

Kindly clarify what you suggest wrt a "plug chop" plse? Did you maybe mean a plug swop...lol....?
 

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Kindly clarify what you suggest wrt a "plug chop" plse?
You might be lean at high revs and speed, so ride at the problem speed for a few minutes then shut off the engiine, pull the clutch and pull over and stop. Pull the plug and inspect.
 

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Noted than guys.
That experiment might be challenging since the "problem speed" is 120 km/h...lol...and I wouldn't want to stop next to the road and check plugs..lol. I will try to check the plugs before the next start...I am not far from the highway so I rode about 1 km since I got of the freeway the last time.

The thing is also, I am suspecting that my right carb is already running a little rich even, since there are more black residue in the right exhaust than in the left. If it is running rich, could that also cause the higher temp as explained before? It does not seem so..
 

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Rich generally runs cooler, lean hotter.

A restricted exhaust can cause a rise in engine temps. Not saying this is your issue - just throwing it out there. With a restricted exhaust a bike usually doesn't want to run into the redline. If it redlines that likely isn't it.

Does your bike have the radiator shroud fitted? This has little air scoops built in on either side to increase flow through the radiator. They can run warm without these.
 

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The previous exhaust (right) had the same issue...and this current one is brand new...so I doubt its a blockage / restriction in exhaust. Probably fuel / air mixture that needs adjustment as a start?

I have the radiator shroud / cover yes.
198683
 

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Frankly, I think this is much ADO about small things.

The engine operating temperature will be dependent on many, many things. Engine load, air temperature, air flow, coolant flow, condition of coolant, type of coolant, radiator damage, radiator internal blockage, engine coolant galleries condition, thermostat operating sensitivity,...…...just a few.

It is a bit unreasonable to expect an engine to operate at a set temperature. Generally, an engine will operate in a range of temperatures.

Perhaps a better understanding of when the thermostat should open (about 180F) and the maximum temperature (engine dependent) for best operation is more enlightening. As long as the engine is within this range, then all is normal.
 

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The coolant is new, and the whole system was flushed, and radiator rinsed before the new coolant was added.

I do understand that there are lots of variables - and thanx for reminding us again..., but these questions and discussions is not just a small thing, just like an engine who overheat is not a small thing. That is a massive thing, which I certainly never want.

I became concerned when I noticed my engin getting hotter on the freeway, which is not normally the case. Up to 110C..which imo is fairly hot..and then the engin seemed as if it wants to get even hotter than that... and that is why we are having this conversation, which is what one does on a form...lol.
 

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Understand. My point is to not become too hyper-focused on gage fluctuation. Frankly, at 110C, I wouldn't consider the engine too hot.

Yes, you are being prudent to investigate other possibles for the perceived problem.
Are you running behind a fairing? These can alter the air flow to possibly "block" the radiator. Same with lowers.
Are you using a custom grill in front of the radiator? These customs can restrict air flow thru the radiator.
Any fork bags or other items on the fork that could be altering the air flow?
Have you "burped" the cooling system?
What fuel are you burning? Octane?
Carb mix at speed is it lean? As mentioned before do a plug chop when at speed, pull plugs examine. This will give a clue to your fuel mix at speed.

Another point to realize is the digital gage will have an accuracy and resolution error associated with it. Digital tend to be overly sensitive with digit shifting (resolution). Have you ever driven a car with a digital speedo? The bloody thing is constantly changing, yet the actual car velocity remains constant. This is showing a resolution sensitivity of the gage.

A simple method to compare the stock needle gage and your new digital gage is with a pot of water and a simple mercury bulb thermometer. Stick them all in a pan of water. You need 2 temperature points.....freezing (0C or 32F) and boiling (100C or 212F). Observe the needle position on the stock gage and the readout of the digital gage compared to the mercury thermometer. This will give you a clue as to the "normal" temperature as indicated on the stock gage compared to the digital. If you want to get really anal about the comparison of the digital you could plot a chart using the mercury thermometer as the X-axis and the digital as the Y-axis. This exercise will allow you to evaluate the hysteresis and repeatability of the gage. One point that is easy missed. You must use all the sensors, wire, power source specific to that particular instrument. This is a system calibration method. When you complete this, then you will have a comparison of the stock (needle) gage, the digital gage with a correlation to an actual temperature. Please note: An open pot of water will not exceed the boiling. Temps below freezing can be obtained with a solution of salt, ice and water.

This is a sledge hammer method to drive a brad nail. Sorry, I was a Research Engineer in an test lab. So, how anal do you need to be? Its your choice.

IR themos are not particularly accurate. They typically are accurate under lab conditions using a "black" body with high emissivity. Our bikes are far from this ideal.
 
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