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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Unfortunately, my '78 CX500 sat idle most of the summer this year. In the spring, things ran fine, but then my schedule went wild and I just never went riding.



So, when I went to start it this weekend, the first thing I did was to drain the carbs to let in new fuel. Some fuel drained out of the overflow lines and then quit.



I checked the line from the tank supplying the carbs. It flowed fine. But as soon as I reconnected the supply line to the carbs, nothing.



I hate pulling the carburetor assembly (it's always a real knuckle bruiser). So, I don't want to just start yanking things apart, especially when I don't have an idea about what could be causing the problem.



Ideas?
 

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So I went to let in new fuel. From what I see in your statement. To the carbs that set over the summer. That alot of heat.

Well do not hate. Pull the carbs and clean them out. gas will Thinkin into goop with the heat.

Just my thoughts.
 

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There's a better chance that the full carbs pressed the fuel needle to a firm seat and they are stuck. You're going to have to pull the carbs to find out anyway unless you want to see if you can blow through the fuel hose and free them but they might just get stuck again when seated again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ha! I did try blowing through the fuel hose to free up whatever might be blocking the fuel. Just got red in the face though.



OK ... will pull the carbs to see what I find.



Does anyone have the secret to getting the carbs in and out without fighting with the air intake boots? Getting those things re-seated is always the worst part of the job for me.
 

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shot in the dark but worth a try before you pull the carbs off. try running carb cleaner through the fuel line port. it may break free or it may not either way its something to try.
 

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I second the thought of spraying a bit of carb cleaner down the fuel inlet. Not a lot, you don't want to mess with the rubber in the line or inside the carb.



Just a couple of tips on removing the carbs. Loosen all the clamps first, then take the intake runner bolts out and rotate the intakes. This will allow a half inch of space to pry the intakes forward. I use a screwdriver down low on the boot. Then do the same on the air box side. Finally pull the carbs out from the left side of the bike and undo the cables.



On some models, you want to remove or swivel up the mount behind the coil, and remove a crankcase vent hose. Oh, and when they don't want to come out, remove the drain hoses. Been there, done that. Before re-installing, I coat the insides of all the boots with Dow 111 valve seal lube. That makes them much easier to slip on and easier off the next time. After a couple of times, you will be down to about 10-15 minutes to remove the carbs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you both ... Blue Fox for the description and Blindstitch for the visual. That should help a lot. I'll give 'er a go this weekend.
 

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I would try tapping the carbs upward from the bowl bottom, with the carb drains open and the fuel tap on. It may unstick the float valve(s), which will be immediately apparent as fuel will flow out the drain. If that works for both carbs, then run some additive like SeaFoam or Startron in the gas to assist in cleaning the carbs. This might get you going.
 
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