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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was finaly able to resolve all of the issues on my '92 Interstate earlier this month. So far I have put in about 250 miles. I am playing with the idea of taking off the fairing but it sure is nice and calm back behind that thing. Just putting this out there in case there are others out there interested in going on rides or talking shop.

I am also looking to buy the the little seat cowl behind the rear passenger seat and a grey short trunk. Dm me if you have one you can part with. I was also thinking of possibly making one out of carbon is I can get one temporarily to use as a mold.

Paul


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Looks like a good bike. I find the Honda fairing works a bit too well in warmer temps IMO. There are several Forum members in your area. Also check out The Slimy Crud Run. I believe several guys usually ride that.

Steve
 

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Hi Paul, I recently did this myself. Actually, my first GL500 was the interstate model which I stripped down naked. The one I have now was naked with a fairing, which I removed. I have a thread on this if you wanted to see what I did on mine: Sprucing up the Silverwing

Personally, I don't care for the fairing, but love the bike.

Dan
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Hi Paul, I recently did this myself. Actually, my first GL500 was the interstate model which I stripped down naked. The one I have now was naked with a fairing, which I removed. I have a thread on this if you wanted to see what I did on mine: Sprucing up the Silverwing

Personally, I don't care for the fairing, but love the bike.

Dan
That's awesome! Good inspiration for my conversion. Right now I am going to bide my time and keep the fairing on. I certainly hasn't hurt with the damp conditions we have had in Wisconsin. I will be working on the suspension until I can get all of the headlight/blinker parts to replace the fairing. What was you technique for identifying and pairing down uneeded wiring? I am considering finding a place to tuck it away in case a conversion back to the fairing is desired.

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There is a sub harness for the fairing that plugs into the bike's main harness (IIRC you will need to cut 1 wire to completely disconnect it). Once you have removed the sub harness the bike's main harness has the correct plug for a standard headlight and bullet connectors for the turn signals exactly the same as the naked model has.

Note that the original front turn signals on these bikes (& most Hondas of the same era) function as both running lights and turn signals. They have the same dual filament type 1157 bulbs that are used in the tail/brake light. The lower power filaments are used as marker lights so they are on normally. When you switch a turn signal on the low filament in that bulb is turned off and the high power filament flashes so that you have BRIGHT-OFF-BRIGHT-OFF (if the low filament was left on you would have BRIGHT-DIM-BRIGHT-DIM). Amber marker lights are only allowed at the front of a vehicle so the rear turn signals do not have marker lights and thus are not suitable for use on the front.

Aside from the obvious safety factor of being more noticeable to other road users, retaining all of the vehicle's original lighting features is a legal requirement in Canada & the US, which means you need to either get front turn signals that are designed to work as marker lights too, make single brightness signals work for both (I have a drawing for that if you decide to go that way) or add separate marker lights (my preference).
 

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No need to cut wires to remove the sub harness from the bike wiring harness however you have to dig deep to find some of the connectors.
 

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I am in the shop right now so I dug out the wiring from my GL500 parts bike to check. It seems that the plug that connects the ignition keyswitch to the harness is part of the fairing sub harness. You need to unplug the connector from the keyswitch, transfer the guard on it to the matching plug on the harness and plug that onto the keyswitch.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Excellent news. Thanks for taking the time Bob! Any advice on removing the rear suspension bolt tucked behind the side stand? How about getting to the bolt at the top of the monoshock? I took a look at the wiki and Motofaction which both warn about it but don't really recomend tool or technique...

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The parts drawing on any Honda dealer's website will show you which of the suspension bolts have loose nuts (= you need to get a nut on them to loosen the bolt) and which of them are screwed into nuts that are welded on.

Be forewarned that if maintenance on the Pro-Link suspension has been neglected too long you may not be able to get the bolts out. If the whole thing isn't disassembled, cleaned and re-assembled with fresh grease periodically the bearings dry out and force the bushings to turn with the bushings when the suspension moves. |when that happens the bolts that go through the bushings become work hardened in the middle by the constant back & forth movement but the ends retain their original properties. Over time water gets in and the now incredibly hard bolts become locked into the bushings by rust. If you try to remove the bolts they commonly snap off just enough outboard of the bearings to keep the parts from coming apart.

Don in Oz once described removing one of those bolts from an otherwise stripped frame by laying the frame on its side and making a support fixture from a piece of steel pipe welded to a plate, then applying penetrating oil and giving it a few hits with a sledge hammer every time he walked past it. I believe it took about a week to get it to move.

Installing zerk fittings (AKA grease nipples) so that you can lubricate the pro-link bearings without disassembling it is commonly recommended but I was one of the first to do that and it didn't help. When I broke the bolt that attaches the suspension link to the frame I first dulled a couple of drill bits trying to drill into the broken bolt and then had to use an angle grinder with a cutoff wheel to cut the link out.
When I put it back together I drilled the new bushings & bearings so that when I pump grease into the zerks it can reach the bolts too (more info here). Now whenever I replace the rear tire I loosen the nuts & bolts and pump in grease until I see it coming out around the bolts so I know they aren't going to become locked in again. That was 8 years ago and I haven't had to disassemble the Pro-Link since.
 
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