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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, A few weeks ago I was trolling on craigslist and saw a cool looking bike, it was a CX650 Custom, I called the guy up and took it for a spin.









What a fun bike, but it had one issue, the starter was bad, well he told me it was the starter, it would spin but not engage. I should have done more research, I thought it was like a car starter, me bad it turns out that the starter clutch is fubar. I took a look at how to replace this and I think it is a tad above my skill set at this time.



Any one know of a good repair shop around Detroit? and what should I expect to pay?



I did talk Phil from Phil's Cycle Shop and his price is $700-$900 but he is going to do more than replace the starter clutch he is going to replace/repair what he can when the case is cracked, the price sounded good, but I wanted to ask here first.
 

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Don't take it to a shop or your better off pushing it out to the curb.



It may seem like a big job but it really isn't that bad.



Engine comes out, rear cover comes off and there's your rotor. Sure it's a little more complicated than that but not much. Just nuts and bolts.



You would need to get the parts. Many have suggested getting a rotor from a gl500. And you will also need gaskets.



But then again maybe someone is close enough to help you.



How much did you pay for the bike? If you don't mind.
 

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Hi Hagis. starter clutch replacement is an engine out procedure. Likely the rollers and springs, as well as the actual starter clutch "basket" will need to be replaced. The springs and rollers are still available new. Other members check me on this, but I do not believe the starter clutch assembly (new) is available. Not to worry, there are many used, recycled, lightly worn available- the trick is to find them. Mine is a GL650 (I rebuilt the starter clutch and did the "triple- stator,mechanical seal, and cam chain- all engine out procedures at the same time), about 1 1/2 year ago.

Your s clutch assembly is probably the same as the GL650. This will give you more availability of parts.

Price things out by adding costs of a gasket set, rollers, springs, and recycled clutch assembly. Parts fische at bikebandit .com or others will be helpful. Add the other costs if you elect to do the other procedures that are typically done when the engine is out.

I suspect you can do it for @1/2 the cost of a shop,- using your own labor.

Not a hard job, if your methodical and a reasonably capable DIY,er.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@Blindstitch

I only have $800 invested in the bike, that is why I don't think putting another 800 into it is a bad deal. I also don't have a good place to work on the bike, the wife thinks that you have to put the cars in the garage for some reason. I don't need to make a decision just yet being the end of sane riding season here in Michigan, I'm going to do some more research to see if this is something I could do.
 

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You can download the factory service manual from this link to really check out all involved.



How many miles are on the bike? This would help us determine what other things should be checked/replaced while the rear cover is off.
 

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@Blindstitch

I only have $800 invested in the bike, that is why I don't think putting another 800 into it is a bad deal. I also don't have a good place to work on the bike, the wife thinks that you have to put the cars in the garage for some reason. I don't need to make a decision just yet being the end of sane riding season here in Michigan, I'm going to do some more research to see if this is something I could do.
Hagis, (Scotish?) I'm in Saginaw and have a locked up spare motor for parts? If you want perhaps we can work a deal?

Cheers, 50gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You can download the factory service manual from this link to really check out all involved.



How many miles are on the bike? This would help us determine what other things should be checked/replaced while the rear cover is off.


Thanks I downloaded it, as for mileage the odometer has 17,000 miles on it, don't know of I trust that figure though.



@50gary half Scottish the other half is Hungarian Gipsy LOL..

thanks for the offer I might have to take you up on that depending on what I decide.
 

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@Blindstitch

I only have $800 invested in the bike, that is why I don't think putting another 800 into it is a bad deal. I also don't have a good place to work on the bike, the wife thinks that you have to put the cars in the garage for some reason. I don't need to make a decision just yet being the end of sane riding season here in Michigan, I'm going to do some more research to see if this is something I could do.


I am willing to bet that at that price the dealer is not replacing the flywheel, which is the most important part of a starter clutch problem.



If you need assistance with the procedure send me an email with your email address so I can contact you directly. I have mentored a lot of people through this procedure.



It is always tougher the first time you pull an engine, but it really isn't hard. It is a little tedious the first time ... but it isn't hard.



Also, I know all the shortcuts ...
 

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Congratulations on your new motorcycle and welcome to the Honda CX/GL forum. First question I have is can you bump start the bike?



Okay next, these bikes are completely fixable by novices and newbies. Few if any special tools are required. You will need quality sockets, Sears Craftsman or better, Allen wrenches, feeler gauges, and an 18mm spark plug socket at a minimum.



I'm somewhat experienced but really, you can pull out the motor in less than one hour. Look at your bike -- there's no lower frame loops. The motor just hangs there. You disconnect the exhaust -- I recommend taking the whole thing off as one big assembly. Remove the seat and gas tank. Then disconnect the carbs. Then unplug the wiring plugs. Then pull out the drive shaft screw hidden in the rubber u-joint boot. Then put a milk crate under the motor. Then pull out the big motor mounting bolts. Clunk, there is sitting on the milk crate. Yeah, it's that easy.



Once the motor is out, the actual repair of the starter clutch is straight forward. Drain out the engine oil and pull off the rear engine cover. Sometimes the starter clutch goes bad because bolts get sheared off and things get bunged up. Sometimes the rollers are just worn out and it takes the other parts with it. Whatever you find, it'll be obvious. The parts are big and easy to understand just looking at it.



We on this forum will walk/talk you through every step.



You can do this!
 

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Actually most starter clutch problems are when the rollers twist in the assembly and mark up the flywheel and then begin to hang up on the scoring instead of engaging like they should.



Most of the twisting occurs when the starter motor doesn't spin like it should due to either a weak battery or a starter that needs cleaning.
 

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Actually most starter clutch problems are when the rollers twist in the assembly and mark up the flywheel and then begin to hang up on the scoring instead of engaging like they should.



Most of the twisting occurs when the starter motor doesn't spin like it should due to either a weak battery or a starter that needs cleaning.
 

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You will enjoy your new 650c!! I bought one off craigs list last spring for $900... 22k miles it was a great investment... all i had to do was a good carb cleaning and tune-up...we rode it over 5000 miles this summer without one problem!! and gets 50mpg. Good Riding!! Mike
 

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Hello all, A few weeks ago I was trolling on craigslist and saw a cool looking bike, it was a CX650 Custom, I called the guy up and took it for a spin.









What a fun bike, but it had one issue, the starter was bad, well he told me it was the starter, it would spin but not engage. I should have done more research, I thought it was like a car starter, me bad it turns out that the starter clutch is fubar. I took a look at how to replace this and I think it is a tad above my skill set at this time.



Any one know of a good repair shop around Detroit? and what should I expect to pay?



I did talk Phil from Phil's Cycle Shop and his price is $700-$900 but he is going to do more than replace the starter clutch he is going to replace/repair what he can when the case is cracked, the price sounded good, but I wanted to ask here first.
If you still need it done you could take it to honda suzuki of warren they are priced pretty good
 

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Welcome to the forum.



It sounds and looks like a huge job, but it actually isnt. I have found the engine on these bikes are a pleasure to work on and no where near as complicated as the manuals many pages makes it feel. Not only that, the people here are the best of the best, and will help and guide you evey step of the way. I know it can be a pain when your wife feels a garage is ONLY to park a car (been there, got smacked for that, drove her nuts, and now its my shop LOL), but I can tell you that you will save a hell of lot more the 50% doing it yourself. I would wager the price quoted would cover his labor, after he tries to source the parts required (most will not be available new OEM) you will end up with either a huge bill, or a "sorry, cant get the parts, put it back together, here's the bill". Doing it yourself allows you to take YOUR time and source bits via Ebay, this forum, junk yards etc, where as a shop wants it in/out ASAP which isnt possible when you cant get the parts shuttled over in 15 min from a dealer.



If you decide to give it a shot (and bribe the wife to park in the driveway for a week) we will be here to help you through it
 

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This thread was started last November. I wonder what the op ever decided to do?
 

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Yea.... we might be beating a dead horse here, he may have sold it already and left the forum
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yea.... we might be beating a dead horse here, he may have sold it already and left the forum


wow this is thread is still alive? I did take it to the guy.. had to source a flywheel.. the one in the bike was tore up..

I'v been riding it all summer.. great bike...
 

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Well that proves it, you can't be Scots.
We would never give someone 800 clams if there were half a chance of doing it ourselves. Must be your Hungarian side




Seriously, with these old bikes, you really do need to learn to do as much as you can yourself ( as others have said) or you are going to be spending way more than the bike is ever worth. Nothing worse than dumping tons into a project then perhaps needing to sell only to find you can never recoup anywhere near what you have in it. Trust me I know that for certain ( and its not the Scotsman talking).



Working on your own bike is also important from a safety standpoint. You'll become more in tune with the bike and will notice sooner when things aren't right. You'll pay more attention to checking things, like oil levels and tire pressure, brakes and loose parts etc. Things that could hurt you if ignored. There is also a huge satisfaction in fixing something yourself. That can translate in a boost in confidence. If the bike fails 50 miles from home you'll have the gumption and experience to sort it. It also keeps you in good stead with the missus when you can keep it running with minimal outlay of cash. Trust me, nothing riles them up more than when you splurge a bit on your "toy".




Give it a whirl next time. You might surprise yourself and enjoy it too.



cheers,

Spyug
 
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