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CX500, CX650, Honda CB350 twin cafe, Honda CM400E raked chopper, Kawasaki 454LTD chopper
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
New here, but not to building Honda’s. This will be my third and fourth build of Honda bikes. Barn finds I got from New York State. 1978 Custom and 1979. The 78 plans are to be a board tracker/chopper, while the 79 a radical custom bobber. Stock parts and accessories will be offered up in the sale section. Look forward to showing and learning on the board!
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'84 CX650E that is evolving into a GL500
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Welcome to the forum and welcome to the world of antique vehicle ownership (they own us, not the other way around). Your bike is about 4 decades old and may or may not have had all of the maintenance necessary to keep it safe & reliable so it is highly recommended to download the Factory Shop Manual for your model (available through the CX Wiki - link in my signature) and go through all of the service procedures, regardless of whether your bike has reached the specified mileage.
I also recommend looking on all rubber parts with suspicion because rubber does not age gracefully. You probably already know to check the date codes on your tires and replace them if they are over 5 years old no matter how good they look & feel (old rubber simply cannot flow around the irregularities in the asphalt well enough to grip, especially if it is cool or wet) but a surprisingly large number of people don't realize that the original rubber brake lines should be replaced every 2 or 3 fluid changes (= 5 or 6 years) too. I recommend modern stainless braided ones (they last practically forever and double the life of the fluid).
And don't forget things like the rad hoses and the boot between the engine and swingarm (they can crack on the bottom where you don't see it).

The best advice anyone can give you about customizing any vehicle is to get it safe & reliable in more or less original condition and use it for a while before you start making any changes so it can tell you what changes it needs to make it do what you want/need better. That approach almost always results in something you actually want to keep and use but making changes based on style or on what someone else (who may or may not really understand how the changes affect the way it works) has done often results in a piece of expensive yard art that looks nice but you can't stand sitting on for more than a few minutes and might even be dangerous.
 
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