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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a new stator installed last week (RM Stator Brand), I ran the bike for 3 hours and noticed white streaks along the battery. To me, it looked like the battery was overcharged, I measured battery voltage at terminals while engine was running: 15.2V: I think it should be around 14V, the workshop manual states that voltage regulator is not ajustable, does it mean it should be replaced?
 

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Not necessarily

Often on these bikes, poor sense and ground connections from the RR will cause

the output voltage to rise.

If it does the electrolyte can gas off and often you'll get a smell like rotten eggs.



One option I choose it to clamp the sense wire ( black)

directly to battery pos

and the Green wire ( ground) directly to battery neg

Not everyone is happy to hack the wiring so If you're not then ensure

all the connectors are clean and sound and test again



If its stll reads over 14.5V then perhaps the RR is faulty after all
 

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Welcome to the forum. Please take a few minutes to edit your signature to show your bike's year and model.



15.2V is too high. As Reg stated, in most cases a charging voltage too high is due to a poor connection with one of the regulator/rectifier wires.
 

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I had an overcharge condition on my GL650 last spring.

It was a bad connection causing resistance in the ignition switch.

this gave the black wire on the RR a running voltage of 1.5v under system voltage.

So it Thought it was regulating the system to 14.2v but was actually putting out 15.7v.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I had an overcharge condition on my GL650 last spring.

It was a bad connection causing resistance in the ignition switch.

this gave the black wire on the RR a running voltage of 1.5v under system voltage.

So it Thought it was regulating the system to 14.2v but was actually putting out 15.7v.


Thank you for your answer! I am not to knowlegeable in electricity: how did you find the source of the broblem?



I am asking that because last weekend, I replaced the actual RR by another used one and I am still reading 15.2V at battery terminals, bike running iddle...
 

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http://www.electrosport.com/media/pdf/fault-finding-diagram.pdf



There is a troubleshooting chart for charging systems at this link. It covers the sensing wire resistance issue you probably have. If your electrical expertise is not extensive enough to use it, ask questions, but look at the chart and make a copy of it for reference first.



The downside to directly connecting the sense wire to the battery (except for temporary troubleshooting purposes) is that it will create a small draw on the battery all the time. This is why the sense wire is routed through the ignition switch, so it does not draw when the mc is off. Some have done this "direct connect" though and if you ride regularly it may not be a problem.
 

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Thanks Kell

Yes, Nate has had a similar problem due to poor or non contacts

the RR has three outputs

power ( red), ground ( green) and sense ( black)

If the ground or sense wires are not properly connected the RR wont be able

to regulate properly and overcharging the battery is a common result of this



With the engine running I would not want to see any more than 14.5 volts

across the battery terminals.

there is no exact figure, but as long as I get a reading between 13.8 and 14.5

I'm happy alls well

HTH
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you for your responses!



OK, now, a quick test is suggested to verify RR connectors: "if you use flying leads to connect the green wire to battery neg and black wire to the battery positive terminal(s?) and test the charge voltage when the engine is running"... I understand that I do not have to disconnect the 2 part RR connector, just introduce the flying lead tip inside of it, also I do not touch the last cable (red/white)? The conclusion of that test is if the voltage is reduced to 14-14.5V, the problem was in poor RR connectors, so clean them, maybe put some dielectric grease to prevent future corrosion and retest.



I am asking all those questions because I do not want to damage anything in the electrical system while doing those tests, it cost me close to 1000$ to change the stator. Yesterday, I asked the shop that did the stator change to verify that high voltage while engine is running (15.2V): they called me back saying they can't fid the problem, they suggested to put a new AGM battery that can manage higher voltage than my regular lead-acid one...
 

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Sounds good to me.

using flying leads on the green and black wire wont hurt

as in fact you're only doubling up existing connections and

not connecting anything to somewhere it doesnt belong.



As for the garage trying to sell you an AGM to handle it

I'd better not print what I'd say to them.

from data gathered elsewhere:



"AGM batteries do not tolerate overcharging. Overcharging dissociates the water in the electrolyte, which is unable to be replaced, leading to premature failure."



AGMs are good batteries but the garages attitude to the fault is

shocking, I wouldnt take my bike there



$1000 to do a stator?

Ouch!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Sounds good to me.

using flying leads on the green and black wire wont hurt

as in fact you're only doubling up existing connections and

not connecting anything to somewhere it doesnt belong.



As for the garage trying to sell you an AGM to handle it

I'd better not print what I'd say to them.

from data gathered elsewhere:



"AGM batteries do not tolerate overcharging. Overcharging dissociates the water in the electrolyte, which is unable to be replaced, leading to premature failure."



AGMs are good batteries but the garages attitude to the fault is

shocking, I wouldnt take my bike there



$1000 to do a stator?

Ouch!


Hello Reg,



I did the test yesterday: first of all, the connector from my RR has 2 green, 2 red & white and one black cable. So I connected one of the 2 greens to the battery neg and the black to the battery pos., the voltage dropped from 15.2 to 14.5V. I didn't see any corrosion on the connectors... Question: is it normal that when connected to do the quick test, the neutral and oil pressure lights be "on", in addition, I did not have to turn the ignition switch "on" to start the engine?
 

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I did the test yesterday: first of all, the connector from my RR has 2 green, 2 red & white and one black cable. So I connected one of the 2 greens to the battery neg and the black to the battery pos., the voltage dropped from 15.2 to 14.5V.





Good !





I didn't see any corrosion on the connectors... Question: is it normal that when connected to do the quick test, the neutral and oil pressure lights be "on", in addition, I did not have to turn the ignition switch "on" to start the engine?





Ok first off the RR on your bike uses two cables for power and ground to carry the 'extra' current, no problem.



Basically its sounds to me you did the test 'in circuit'

ie when the black wire was still connected to the black wire of the system

in effect, you hot wired it


No harm done.



The black wire from the RR doesnt carry any power, its a sense wire

and only connected to the rest of the bikes black wires so it can 'sense'

the voltage and adjust the RR accordingly



If it senses too high a voltage, it shunts excess power to the heat sink

and dissipates it as heat.

if it senses voltages below a certain threshold it keep power flowing into

the bikes system ( battery)



The green is important to the sense circuit as well because

it needs a definite ground to measure from.

Its the same principle as using a tape rule, you need to clip the end

of the tape to the start of whatever you measure or you'll never get a proper measurement.



If the green and black wires from the RR dont get properly connected the

sense circuit has no way to accurately define voltages.



Its sounds as if there's not much wrong with the bike it just needs good

connections



I hope I've explained this clearly and it helps
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I did the test yesterday: first of all, the connector from my RR has 2 green, 2 red & white and one black cable. So I connected one of the 2 greens to the battery neg and the black to the battery pos., the voltage dropped from 15.2 to 14.5V.





Good !





I didn't see any corrosion on the connectors... Question: is it normal that when connected to do the quick test, the neutral and oil pressure lights be "on", in addition, I did not have to turn the ignition switch "on" to start the engine?





Ok first off the RR on your bike uses two cables for power and ground to carry the 'extra' current, no problem.



Basically its sounds to me you did the test 'in circuit'

ie when the black wire was still connected to the black wire of the system

in effect, you hot wired it


No harm done.



The black wire from the RR doesnt carry any power, its a sense wire

and only connected to the rest of the bikes black wires so it can 'sense'

the voltage and adjust the RR accordingly



If it senses too high a voltage, it shunts excess power to the heat sink

and dissipates it as heat.

if it senses voltages below a certain threshold it keep power flowing into

the bikes system ( battery)



The green is important to the sense circuit as well because

it needs a definite ground to measure from.

Its the same principle as using a tape rule, you need to clip the end

of the tape to the start of whatever you measure or you'll never get a proper measurement.



If the green and black wires from the RR dont get properly connected the

sense circuit has no way to accurately define voltages.



Its sounds as if there's not much wrong with the bike it just needs good

connections



I hope I've explained this clearly and it helps


Reg,



thank you for the quick answer! How about the other question I asked:



Question: is it normal that when connected to do the quick test, the neutral and oil pressure lights be "on", in addition, I did not have to turn the ignition switch "on" to start the engine?



Raynald
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Already answered that Reynald

You 'hot wired' it by putting power on the black when it was in circuit

and effectively turning on the ignition


OK, do you mean I should have disconnect the RR connector from the bike connector and only connect one of the RR green cable to the battery neg and the RR black cable to the battery pos? It also means not connect the 2 RR red&white cables?
 

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OK, do you mean I should have disconnect the RR connector from the bike connector and only connect one of the RR green cable to the battery neg and the RR black cable to the battery pos? It also means not connect the 2 RR red&white cables?
NO

Leave it connected or you'll get no power out.

It means you need to check and clean all related connectors

If you still get over 14.5V across the battery you still have a sensing problem



What I do is remove the black wire from the RR side of the connector

and clamp it to the battery positive terminal.

you can do this, or find out why its not making proper contact in the bikes

wiring and fix it.
 
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