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1973 Honda CB450 k6; 1981 Honda GL500 Silverwing Interstate
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I usually don't make intro posts. But this time I feel I have to.

I'm going to break this into three sections. Myself; The Bike; and What now?

Myself
209702

Hi, I'm Trevor, as you probably guessed from the name. I'm 23, born and raised in Eagle River, Wisconsin. Now living in Appleton.
I'm the first in my family to be a motorcyclist. I didn't really have any friends that were into it, it was just kind of an itch that never went away. I just always wanted a motorcycle.
After years of dreaming and on and off searching I finally picked up my first bike on July 4th, 2018. A 1973 CB450 for 500 bucks. Guy said it ran and drove, just needed a chain and battery..... well, that wasn't quite the case 😅 I had no idea what I was getting into and it's nothing short of a miracle I stuck with it. Never got a single mile on the bike till late summer of 2019 when I got it going and put 500 miles on it before the end of the season. The next spring I forgot to lock down the cam chain tensioner and bent my intake valves. Spent all summer rebuilding the top end and finally got my first gear to work after 3 years over the winter. I've put almost 2k miles on it since then! (we wont talk about how many times I had the engine open)

The Bike
209701

Yeah I already talked about a bike but this is about the one that brought me here.

Shortly after a deal fell through with a CB750 nighthawk I was looking at I stumbled across a 1981 GL500 Silverwing Interstate on marketplace a half hour after it was posted. Seeing the condition I immediately jumped on it! I knew a bit about the engines because I looked at a CX500 that needed more work than I wanted and was looking for a more long distance machine so this fit the bill. When I showed up to look at the bike I met David Wiener's niece. She told me a little bit about Dave and his username on this forum and I decided to look him up.

I never once met the man but seeing all the stories everyone shared about him almost made me tear up. I wish I had a chance to meet him. Now owning one of his bikes I feel obligated to do my part in keeping what he represented going. Admittedly I was thinking about doing a quick flip on this bike because I felt it was being sold for really cheap! (Sorry if you read this Heather) but as I'm sure you all know, these old Honda's have a charm about them that grabs your heart strings quickly and before you know it. I would really like to ride this bike to some of the rally's that David used to go to and meet some of his friends here.

Looking at Davids impact here and being that I have a fresh start in this community I decided to take inspiration from his username... if that wasn't obvious. I hope that doesn't bother anyone.

What now?

Hey I never claimed to be good at transitions.
Now I want to get this bike on the road and start making new memories and sharing old ones. My friend that's also into bikes helped me tow this one the 2 miles to my house with my car and a tow strap that I held on the footpeg! He also helped me push the bike a quarter mile along a busier road with the front brakes slightly locked up!

I was hoping someone here would know where David was with this bike. I saw mention of someone named Andrew that was close to him when he was near his end. I would appreciate any knowledge or advice anyone has. I also plan on attending this weeks zoom meeting.

Anyway that's enough of my rambling.
Cheer's to whatever awaits!
209703
 

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A dragging front brake will heat up and may grab tighter, leading to an unhappy ending. No lecture here, just experience! I always take a rubber mallet when i look at prospective purchases, a few raps on the front caliper will usually free up the stuck front brake enough to roll it, until its applied again! A brake servicing is ALWAYS needed if it sticks, to ride safely. As to towing a bike on the road with a rope, YIKES! And I’m not particularly risk averse. Motorcycle riding has inherently higher risks of serious injury or death, best not to increase the odds unnecessarily. FYI David W was well known for his mechanical thoroughness, but also for his safe riding habits and advice. He rode very high mileages with ease. Welcome to our community!
 

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1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
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Welcome to the family, Trevor!
Andrew was David's protege during his final years in an attempt to pass on all the knowledge he had gained about these machines. Andrew is occasionally on the forum, but I don't recall his username.
There's nothing particular about the brakes on a GL500, so anyone with sufficient experience in motorcycle mechanics should be able to help you. If you're mechanically adept, you can teach yourself using this forum and the Factory Service Manual.
One event David regularly attended is the annual Twin Cities Spring Ride. Tentatively, Spring Ride XV will be the Saturday after Memorial Day 2022. I hope to meet you then.
 
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1973 Honda CB450 k6; 1981 Honda GL500 Silverwing Interstate
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11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A dragging front brake will heat up and may grab tighter, leading to an unhappy ending. No lecture here, just experience! I always take a rubber mallet when i look at prospective purchases, a few raps on the front caliper will usually free up the stuck front brake enough to roll it, until its applied again! A brake servicing is ALWAYS needed if it sticks, to ride safely. As to towing a bike on the road with a rope, YIKES! And I’m not particularly risk averse. Motorcycle riding has inherently higher risks of serious injury or death, best not to increase the odds unnecessarily. FYI David W was well known for his mechanical thoroughness, but also for his safe riding habits and advice. He rode very high mileages with ease. Welcome to our community!
I assure you the towing process was way smoother than it sounds! haha It was 90% neighborhood roads with minimal traffic. And that quarter mile we pushed it was the only busy part and we stuck to the sidewalk. I'm sure some passerby's thought we were stealing the bike in broad daylight :ROFLMAO: I'm not much of a risk taker, If I wasn't sure of it I would've found another way.
Welcome to the family, Trevor!
Andrew was David's protege during his final years in an attempt to pass on all the knowledge he had gained about these machines. Andrew is occasionally on the forum, but I don't recall his username.
There's nothing particular about the brakes on a GL500, so anyone with sufficient experience in motorcycle mechanics should be able to help you. If you're mechanically adept, you can teach yourself using this forum and the Factory Service Manual.
One event David regularly attended is the annual Twin Cities Spring Ride. Tentatively, Spring Ride XV will be the Saturday after Memorial Day 2022. I hope to meet you then.
My current work field is as a Diesel Mechanic. I've rebuilt the brakes on my 450 and am currently in school to be an Aircraft Mechanic. I'm no shop guru, but I know my way around motor vehicles. I have a 70's CB750 engine that I picked up for 30 bucks that I want to tear into for fun haha.
I hope to have the bike ready for the Tomahawk Fall ride near my hometown. I'll definitely have it going for next year if I can't get it by then. Getting time off work is a whole other story.

Thanks for the welcome!
 

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1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
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Aside from a couple rentals, I'm new to diesel. Pickable brains are always a plus in such situations.
I have learned enough to look for a 2011 or newer F350, so I'll have an SCR exhaust. I don't want to deal with DPF, or the legal risks of a delete. The first time I encountered DEF, I thought it was akin to blinker fluid and muffler bearings!
 
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