Honda CX 500 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,070 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found this thread on the old site last night. It was started by Blue fox and I thought it was worth re-posting. Blue fox originally had 11 points, I have edited in the others that were posted as well. Enjoy.



I have been reading posts for several years now and every six months or so, the same topics seem to arise. So, I am attempting to list a partial list of what I consider misinformation on these bikes. Since some of this is subjective, not all may agree with my thoughts. But that is fine, let the discussions begin.



1. Loud pipes save lives. I think a more realistic view is: "Loud pipes irritate lives". We don't win many friends outside our community with something that irritates them.



2. The higher the octane, the better the bike will run. Not really, the higher octane actually has less power than a lower octane. If your bike "pings", then you need to move up. Otherwise, send the extra money you are spending to Chopper Charles.



3. Pod filters will improve your bikes performance and make it able to leap tall buildings in a single bound. The pod filters change the vacuum seen by the carbs and will only cause the bike to run worse. If you want to use pods, consider using non constant velocity carbs. That air box was there for a reason.



4. Eliminating the H box and mufflers will also increase performance. Same deal, the carbs are designed to run with a calculated amount of back pressure that is provided by the original exhaust system. If you have to get rid of it, plan on re-jetting, and fiddling.



5. Adjusting the idle mixture screw in will make the bike run richer, and turning it out, leans the mixture. Just the opposite is true. These needle valves control the flow of fuel, not air. Some types of carbs do have a air control valve for low speed mixture adjustment, ours do not.



6. These bikes can get "out of time" There is no timing adjustment for the CX bikes, and almost none for the GL's. It is possible to have a bike out of time on reassembly, but I have never heard of a timing chain jumping a gear tooth.



7. You should sync your carbs at 3000 RPM. Syncing the carbs is essentially adjusting the butterflys to open at the same time. It should be done at idle speed, and that should take care of the issue.



8. You should always inflate your tires to the maximum shown on the tire's sidewall. I don't think so, use the manufacturer's recommended pressures, and maybe a bit more considering the new technology of tires today.



9. It is imperative to order re-build kits when you take a carb, caliper, or master cylinder apart for cleaning. Sometimes, yes, most times no. The metal parts of carbs, calipers, and MC can usually be cleaned. The rubber parts sometime deteriorate and do need replacing, but not often. If you can, disassemble first and check condition of the parts, if you don't need new parts, send the money you would have spent to ChopperCharles.



10. Cleaning the carbs should be avoided by most people. The reality is that carb cleaning is not done on a full moon, by guys in shrouds, around a bonfire, using instruments unknown to the civilized world. Get Larry's book if you feel intimidated by the process. And follow it to the letter. The only thing worse than not cleaning them at all is cleaning them poorly and thinking you have now eliminated all carb problems from your bike. A quick spray out and wink, will not do. I think that 90% of all suspected electrical issues are actually carb problems.



11. Use the rear tire to rotate the engine for valve adjustments because the manual says to. The guy that wrote this may have only had Honda's tool kit available. Use a 17mm socket in the inspection hole under the radiator, and turn clockwise.



12) "You can properly service these bikes without a manual", but that may just be my personal beef.



13) "The so-called expert service technician at the bike shop knows more than you do." Mostly untrue, and the owner definitely cares more than the so called expert. You may not be able to beat them for speed, but you can beat them for quality.



14. If you hear a clanging sound automatically assume you need to change the cam chain....I say make sure it's not really clutch rattle first especially if the bike has under 30,000 miles as clutch rattle seems to be just as common an issue.



Here is a link to the original thread in case someone would like to read all of the posts.



Myths, untruths, and misinformation about our bikes.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,404 Posts
The guy that wrote #11 has probably been beaten by a sock full of nickels in public. He's probably the same guy that wrote you can take off the fan by using the axle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,070 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You know how it is, why go down to the hardware or auto parts store when you can just take your bike apart in the same amount of time. And if you happen to mess something up, well that's just a bonus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
Can't tell you how much time I wasted and frustration I caused myself in the beginning by working that blasted tire back and forth to get to TDC...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Don, I used the axle to remove my fan, it actually worked.



Bryan, I'm probably preaching to the choir but - The "back and forth", whether with tire or crank bolt, can have one end up with the cam chain slack on the 'wrong side'. Always approach the timing mark with the crank turning clockwise, as viewed from the front.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,517 Posts
I don't understand why a straight press in a tapered hole would not work, i.e. Axle-Fan... but there might be "better" ways.





All these "Arguments" in one place... and IMHO
they contradict themselves in a sarcastic way that does no good as far as "Real Information" ... not much of this makes enough sense to me to be worth discussion...






my .02
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,404 Posts
Don, I used the axle to remove my fan, it actually worked.



Bryan, I'm probably preaching to the choir but - The "back and forth", whether with tire or crank bolt, can have one end up with the cam chain slack on the 'wrong side'. Always approach the timing mark with the crank turning clockwise, as viewed from the front.


Sure it works if you use the rear but it isn't advised. Besides all axles are not created equal. In fact some of the front ones only have 12mm threads instead of 14. But if you want to do it right get the right bolt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,999 Posts
The end of the front axle is tapered,,if you use it you are only getting two or three threads that fully engage the threads in the fan hub,,it will work sometimes but if the fan is stubborn you can end up stripping out the threads in the fan hub.



You want a bolt that is not tapered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
I didn't use my axle to take my fan off, but I did take the axle nut to find the right size bolt to take it off. OBTW, I had to go to a motorcycle shop to find one the right size. None of the box stores or hardware stores had one the right size.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,404 Posts
One would have to wonder if there is a common bolt like for pulling the rotor. 14mm shouldn't be that hard to find.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,601 Posts
14mm isn't that hard, it's finding a 14mm with that fine of a pitch thread that's difficult. Kind of like when you need to find an odd sized 14-28 SAE bolt.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,202 Posts
Marshall's right, motorcycle threads tend to be finer than threads on other things to help prevent loosening due to vibration.



At M4,5,6 and I think up to M8 the 1.25 pitch is fairly standard for all things.



At M10, many motorcycle bolts are still 1.25 but virtually everything else has stepped up to 1.5 pitch



At M20 we are still using 1.5 while for most other applications by this size the thread pitch has become quite coarse.

[Can't quantify this as I'm not sure what pitch is actually used but it's a lot coarser than 1.5.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
I must be a Gorilla...




Always used the axle, always got the fan off, never had a problem. I'm sure they put in the manual for a reason.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
Others have stripped threads using the axle, as I recall. I've seen this debate a few times.



How about some more myths?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Good advice except for #2. I retired from a major oil company & spent 26 of my 30 years in gasoline blending & testing. Higher octane does not mean lower power but if your engine runs good on 87 R+M/2 use it. It's cheaper. The average gasoline is made up of 12 - 14 different components. Ethanol (alcohol) is now the highest octane component. Iso-octane (100 octane) has the highest BTU component now used but has less octane than ethanol.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top