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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So the summer heat combined with worsened traffic resultant of several construction projects involving major roadways in the area has prompted me to make the switch to an electric fan. While I wasn't running into overheating under intended conditions, the mechanical fan is just he opposite of ideal for creeping in traffic. Turning off the engine seems to even make it worse; creating hotspots in the cooling circuit. I'd regularly creep into the danger zone during hot summer commutes so I decided to get the parts together and commit an unrideable, rainy weekend to completing the conversion.

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Everything showed up at my door on Friday (excellent!). The fan is a Ducati 1098 right-side radiator fan so I could avoid cutting the cam shaft. The original connector was stripped in favor of a 9005/9006 connectors which have a weatherproof connection to the rest of the circuit. It consists of: a 4-terminal auto relay with socket to handle the current, a GMA fuse holder for a 6A GMA fuse, an 80C normally-open temperature switch, a push-pull override switch, and plenty of wire/connectors.

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I thought it'd be smart to fit this as an override switch opposite the choke lever so it looked somewhat symmetrical. The positioning worked great, but this particular switch is flaky at best. It functions but will make a very poor connection if you even just look at it wrong. I may switch to a good old steel toggle.

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Don't forget to test your thermo switches before it's epoxied to your radiator.

At this point, I soldered and heat-shrink wrapped all the finer parts of the circuits.

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Looks like I found a more compelling reason to finish this project. Look at those cracks!

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I started at the battery with the fuse holder plus the 18 AWG.

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That wire was guided under the seat and over the airbox to the compartment where the user manual usually resides–where the relay would live. More wire was run from the gated terminal of the relay to the radiator using some of the factory wiring routes, some cursing, and angry stabs-of-faith with a needle-nose pliers.

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It cleans up well.

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The relay was spliced into the black wire under the seat.

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After a generous radiator flush (mine wasn't too bad), I was able to fit the fan using some corner braces riveted to the fan's mounting points. Machine screws with lock nuts held the other ends into the fan housing. Some slight bending got it to clear both the camshaft and the radiator when mounted.

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Tested this about 1000 times because I couldn't believe it all just worked.

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Time to tidy up the main ground wire and all the splice points under the seat.

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I spliced in some wires to the override switch, used some putty epoxy to hold the thermo switch to the radiator, put it all back together. Some idling in the garage revealed that the thermo switch was working and switching on at about half way.

In addition to all that, I changed the fork oil, added some air to the forks, replaced the air filter, and (what I should have done long ago) replaced the spark plugs. I had to completely relearn the bike's handling by the end of it all, but for the better.
 

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Very nice write up and photos, thanks
 

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Nice job, well thought out and well installed. :)

My only comment for what it is worth would have been to probably get a better join where you have spliced the wire into a switched power source under the seat - it could be a weak point in your circuit.

cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Glad to hear it. I'd bet that handlebar switch would hold up pretty well. I did manage to give that push/pull switch a second chance. The innards were serviceable so after reshaping the contacts to a more aggressive angle, it has a much better feel and reliable contact when switched on. For the few times it may be needed.

Those splice taps do make me glad I ran the extra wire and keep them under the seat where they're accessible. I'll likely just solder and seal.
 

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Curious: No picture of the engine before you inserted the Duc fan. Mr. Sox, what was the particular manner in which you chose to perform the Honda-fan-ectomy and cap the shaft?

(For completeness' sake, you understand.)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I feel like I missed out on a few photo ops and my info is a bit sparse to qualify this as a write-up. There are better write-ups out there and I just happened to take a cheaper route with more accessible components (which I may regret, but have many spares). However, if anyone is interested in a more detailed version of what's shown here, I'd be happy to cook something up.

I think it was mentioned in another thread here, but the beauty of the Duc 1098 fan is that it's small enough to require zero modification of the camshaft to fit. In the end, there's about 1/4" clearance from the camshaft and the same for the front of the fan to the radiator. A few solid pushes on the radiator showed that contact would be unlikely even under the bumpiest of conditions. Slightly top-right from center (facing the front of the bike) is where I mounted mine. If you were to modify the original mounts and offset the fan to one side even more, you'd probably have the fan nearly a full inch away from the camshaft.
 
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