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Have you been in a motorcycle accident?

  • Yes

    Votes: 20 80.0%
  • No

    Votes: 5 20.0%
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1981 CX500C
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good afternoon everyone
This is not an easy subject for everyone, but I need to see some stats. Long time ago, My parents were in a motorcycle accident, not their fault. Mom lost her leg from it and dad has a messed up ankle and back from it. Who’s been in an accident? I’ve been told it will be inevitable for everyone. This is the first motorcycle I’ve ever ridden. Have any accidents been caused by a malfunction of the bike?
 

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1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
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I've been down a couple times. Low speed, no serious injury, minor damage to the bike.
 
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The term accident implies that nothing could have been done to prevent the crash. I've been off my bike three times, all due to operator error. No serious injuries.
 

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Not me.

It's not inevitable. that is the wrong mindset.

Learn roadcraft and use it.

If you look at the statistics for motorcycle accidents and their causes there are many behaviours that if you don't do them that will cut your chances of an accident.

To be perfectly honest, many of our motorcycle accidents locally are caused by riders riding beyond their capabilities. A lot of the crashes in the hills are simply from carrying too much speed into the bends.

Don't ride like an idiot and you'll cut your risks by over half.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Not me.

It's not inevitable. that is the wrong mindset.

Learn roadcraft and use it.

If you look at the statistics for motorcycle accidents and their causes there are many behaviours that if you don't do them that will cut your chances of an accident.

To be perfectly honest, many of our motorcycle accidents locally are caused by riders riding beyond their capabilities. A lot of the crashes in the hills are simply from carrying too much speed into the bends.

Don't ride like an idiot and you'll cut your risks by over half.
I appreciate this comment.
 

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Learn roadcraft and use it.

If you look at the statistics for motorcycle accidents and their causes there are many behaviours that if you don't do them that will cut your chances of an accident.
As someone who taught defensive driving I have to agree with "Learn roadcraft and use it"! I have used my defensive driving to avoid the mistakes of others while on the road.

Two of my offs were due to loose material on the road surface, so clearly at the time I was riding too fast, sub-20kph, for road conditions at the time. My third off was with the sidecar. That was due to being tired and not having enough seat time on the rig.
 

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1978 CX500 "The Grub", 1983 GL650I "Nimbus"
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To be perfectly honest, many of our motorcycle accidents locally are caused by riders riding beyond their capabilities. A lot of the crashes in the hills are simply from carrying too much speed into the bends.

Don't ride like an idiot and you'll cut your risks by over half.
As I tell friends a couple years into riding, don't let confidence outpace experience.
 

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You not only have to pay attention to the vehicles around you and try to know where everybody is in case things start to happen suddenly while trying to avoid vehicle blindspots, you also have to try to observe anything else that may affect these vehicles while watching side turnings etc. Urban riding is rarely restful.
 

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Time and space required!
 

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Time and space required!
In congested traffic that can be difficult but we can filter legally here for roughly the last couple of years. Though I've always done it.

I only do it once the traffic has stopped and pretty much can't move. Never past heavy vehicles and at low speed. {me}

This allows me to get out in front of the traffic on the green and run, at least for a while, not surrounded by traffic. No immediate threats and my vision is opened right up.

And it's a valid reason for wringing its neck a bit.

Our laws say it can be done at 30 kmh. Bugger that. Going down among moving traffic is not among my fondest aspirations.
 

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I went down at low speed on pavement once in the rain and caught a small rock or gravel in a turn. front wheel went out from under me.

The Smith system is taught in many defensive driving classes.
Using the mnemonic “All good kids like milk” is a good way to remember the “A,” “G,” “K,” “L” and “M” of Smith’s 5 Keys:
  1. Aim High in Steering®
  2. Get the Big Picture®
  3. Keep Your Eyes Moving®
  4. Leave Yourself an Out®
  5. Make Sure They See You®
full details here. Applies to all motorized vehicles but is uses heavily in the trucking industry
Keys To Safe Driving: The Smith System | PAM Transport (pamdrivingjobs.com)
 

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81 Gl500i 83 CX650E
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Have only had three accidents in 38 years of riding, first one was in my first year of riding. It was my most serious one. Slid into the back of a pickup truck, scar on right leg is a reminder too always follow my four rules of riding. First, I AM INVISIABLE ! Second ,Am I fit to ride! Third is my bike Fit to ride. Fourth and as important never be in a HURRY to get somewhere, which is differant than going fast. The other two accidents where caused by me breaking one of these four rules.
Hope this will save someone ,cheers and Safe travels
 

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Suppose need to think of miles covered....ie accident if any in 1000s of miles...if you cover many miles the "risk" is higher BUT not inevitable as was stated..
Are we including slides in the survey? and the old.. "layed the bike down to avoid hitting the car/post"can be a thread on its own...

Few slides...one hit....slides not to avoid collisions...
 

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With the right attitude and knowledge , a motorcycle can be safer than a car. Not to long ago was almost in a head-on collision 3 miles from home . Some car was passing a row of cars ,and If was in my car would have been in a ditch or a serious game of Chicken. Being on the bike just moved onto the shoulder and went home alive and well.
I do recommend stay in the learning mode ,cheers
 
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I have been riding for 20 years, mostly on pavement. I was rear ended while I was stopped at a stop sign, no injury and minimal damage. Second was me taking an inside curve too fast trying to keep up with a friend on a bigger, faster bike (mountain dirt roads). Fractured my left ankle on that one. I wear armor, and I mean head to toe. Fractured ankle would have been shattered if I was wearing regular shoes. My two accidents were due to bad driving and me not paying attention and by me being overconfident and not thinking about safety first. I drive cars and bikes the same, very defensively. Defensive riding and proper protection are really important. Many great comments and recommendations from the others.
 

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Ill add...its been said before...good helmet, replace every 5 years...solid boots, abrasion resistant jacket and pants even for those town runs...
Respect for the road/your bikes limits (many accidents happen on borrowed bikes or new bikes the riders not used to.......), and your own limits...
Remember a car or even truck will stop sooner than you in the wet if you are on a older non ABS bike.....keep good distance AND road position...
In combination the above will lessen chances of accident/injury....
 

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I've never ridden a bike with ABS. I'm not opposed to the idea. Every little bit helps. But practicing threshold braking is a life saver on old bikes.

Learn it and practice it until it is stored in muscle memory.

I find CXs will occasionally lock the rear brake but release and reapply works as long as it is done quickly enough.

Bike control should come automatically without thought. Leaving you to consider the hazards around you.

Many new riders come to grief because their attention is taken up with using the bike itself leaving little over to observe .... those a$$holes out there ....
 
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