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Seadoobie
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Discussion Starter #1
I know this has been asked, and I read some of the previous posts but I’m still missing something. I bought the new MOSFET from Murray when I ordered my carbs and I’m trying to get the bike wired up. I do not have the factory wiring harness and I’m moving everything to an under seat tray so I wouldn’t be able to use it anyway. I’ve seen that you can basically run the two non-stator wires to the positive and negative of the battery, but I’m missing something. Looking at the wiring diagram, it appears I need the extra wire for connections to a lot of things. Which one am I abandoning? The green or the black? And what do I do with the devices that show to be connected to the non existent wire?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Seadoobie
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Discussion Starter #2
Forgot to add, I also have the Ignitech.
 

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as far as the regulator rectifier goes you need the three yellow and green to ground red to battery

you can put a fuse on the red wire if you want at 30 amps

that completes the charging circuit and needs no other inter connections with the rest of the wiring

nothing else attaches to it
 

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Seadoobie
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Discussion Starter #4
So all the devices wired to the black wire in the attached diagram still connect to each other, just not the R/R? For instance the wire from the RR in the diagram goes straight up to the brake light switch. I Still run that wire just don’t connect it to anything? The brake light switch will work with one wire? Forgive my ignorance. I’m used to AC. This is my first wiring attempt at DC but I really want to learn this.
 

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The black wire is for key switched power. It connected to the old regulator as a "sense" wire, letting the regulator know the system voltage. The MOSFET regulator does not need this wire AFAIK. All other devices will still receive power through the black wire as before.

I find it helps to treat the wiring diagram like a road map. Consider that power flows out the positive battery terminal and eventually returns home by the negative terminal. If you follow the red wire to the key switch you will see that it then connects to the black wire when the key is in the on position.
 
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BTW: It drives me nuts when people refer to a regulator/rectifier that uses Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors in its circuitry as a "MOSFET". It isn't.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOSFET


Sorry if this post bothers anyone but I've seen it one time to many and I had to say something.
 

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BTW: It drives me nuts when people refer to a regulator/rectifier that uses Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors in its circuitry as a "MOSFET". It isn't.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOSFET


Sorry if this post bothers anyone but I've seen it one time to many and I had to say something.
Bob,

Since i am electrically challenged (and you drew attention to it) can you shed some light on the following questions please?

Why are they called MOSFET R/Rs anyway?
What is a "regular" R/R called?
How are they different?
Is a "MOSFET" R/R better than a traditional unit?

Thanks
 

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better get used to it bob this one you cant fight its a global

and i quote

Difference between a Shunt regulator and a Mosfet Regulator

A more common shunt-type regulator uses a solid-state electrical component called a Silicon Controlled Rectifier (SCR) as the switch to send stator current to the battery or to ground. A MOSFET regulator uses its namesake, a Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor to do the switching. The main differences are in switching speed and heat generation. The SCR is very slow to switch, and requires lots of electrical current to complete the switch, resulting in lots of heat and variation in the battery voltage. The MOSFET regulator is extremely quick to switch positions, and requires much less current to control, resulting in a much cooler unit, and significantly more stable battery voltage. Heat is the primary killer of voltage regulator-rectifiers, so when you use a part that runs cooler and works better with the same type of connection and mounting package, why not make the change?
 

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Thanks Murray! Sounds like the MOSFET is the way to go if you are going to replace your R/R.
 

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What Murray said. And R/R or reg/rec means regulator/rectifier. As recently as the 1970s it was more common for the rectifier and the regulator to be separate devices All CX/GL500/650 models came with combined reg/recs but GoldWings did not change to the combined type until thte GL1100 was introduced in 1980.

I do not object to the terms "MOSFET regulator/rectifier". "Mosfet reg/rec" or "MOSFET R/R". My objection is to people dropping the important part of the name that tells you what they do and calling them by the part that only describes the type of reg/rec they are. It is right up there with calling a cell phone a "cell" (NO, the cell is the area around the cell tower that the phone connects to the network through. The thing you carry with you is a "phone") and referring to a satellite dish as a "satellite" (NO, a satellite is something that orbits something else; TV satellites cost millions and are in Low Earth Orbit. The thing on the side of your house that is aimed at the satellite is a "dish".) and the whole host of similar cases of people dropping the important part of something's name. After all, we don't refer to a brick house as a "brick" do we?
 

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Seadoobie
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Discussion Starter #11
Awesome info! Thanks everyone! My mistake was looking at the MOSFET as the source rather than another “accessory”
 
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Seadoobie
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Discussion Starter #12
ok looking at this closer, the black wire from the ignition switch actually doesn't provide power to the black wire on the diagram going to the MOSFET or the 7Volt relay and many other things. The keyed Black wire only goes to the front brake light switch and the horn? unless the wiring diagram is wrong. I don't see where the Black wire gets power for everything else.
 

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Seadoobie
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Discussion Starter #15
Ok cool so the diagram was missing a connector. Thanks!!
 

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Seadoobie
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