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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The front frame member that supports the front of the engine and the radiator is rusted.

I have been wire wheeling it to try and get all the paint off it.The wheel is in my drill

There MUST be an easier way. As I have said before I know nothing of paint.

I figure pouring brake fluid on it would get the paint off but would I ever be able to get paint to stick to it after that? I don't know. I do not have any containers large enough or immune enough or I would dip it in the left over battery acid I have from my new battery. Not sure that is a good idea either.

I do not have or have access to a sand blaster. So what is left??

Is there a chemical paint remover that is good to use?

Thanks in advance again!
 

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The front frame member that supports the front of the engine and the radiator is rusted.

I have been wire wheeling it to try and get all the paint off it.The wheel is in my drill

There MUST be an easier way. As I have said before I know nothing of paint.

I figure pouring brake fluid on it would get the paint off but would I ever be able to get paint to stick to it after that? I don't know. I do not have any containers large enough or immune enough or I would dip it in the left over battery acid I have from my new battery. Not sure that is a good idea either.

I do not have or have access to a sand blaster. So what is left??

Is there a chemical paint remover that is good to use?

Thanks in advance again!


Go to your local auto parts store. They should have something called Aircraft Stripper. I got some at Auto Zone. It works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Go to your local auto parts store. They should have something called Aircraft Stripper. I got some at Auto Zone. It works.


Excellent!

Tomorrow after work!

Man trying to hand strip this thing is a HUGE P.I.T.A.

Thanks. I was going to walk into Home Despot tomorrow and ask the paint guy but I am glad to have the voice of experience guide my purchase!
 

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Why not just sand/bead blast the frame, it will clean it down to the raw metal and you can then see any and all defects like rust. I blasted mine, repaired/welded the rust at the bottom of the frame where they love to rust from water collection...then had it blasted again to remove the surface rust as the bare metal begins to rust the same day but just a fine powder...then powder coated black and Power Clear, good for another +30years.



And it's "cheap" to do this.



Oh and Brake fluid does not work, it takes a LONG time to have any effect depending what kinda paint you contaminating. Only way to strip is, blasting/sanding,heat and acid of some form....dirty time consuming job...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Why not just sand/bead blast the frame, it will clean it down to the raw metal and you can then see any and all defects like rust. I blasted mine, repaired/welded the rust at the bottom of the frame where they love to rust from water collection...then had it blasted again to remove the surface rust as the bare metal begins to rust the same day but just a fine powder...then powder coated black and Power Clear, good for another +30years.



And it's "cheap" to do this.



Oh and Brake fluid does not work, it takes a LONG time to have any effect depending what kinda paint you contaminating. Only way to strip is, blasting/sanding,heat and acid of some form....dirty time consuming job...


If I go further than just trying to make the bike ride-able then I will investigate going all out and stripping all the frame. As it is that frame member had some rust and I did not want it sitting right next to pretty engine.
 

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Alternately (and possibly cheaper) go to a Home Depot type store or any large paint store and get a paint stripper that contains methylene chloride. It's almost a gel so it sticks in place and it will make short work of removing that tough Honda clear coat and paint often in one try. Also pick up a couple of those really cheap 0.49 paint brushes, often referred to as chip brushes. Home depot, etc will have them as will Harbor Freight and other discount tool places.



This is far better than the aircraft paint remover but with both make darn sure you've got a long sleeve shirt you can part with if it gets any on it. You DO NOT want to come in contact with this powerful stripper, if you accidentally get a drop on you you won't notice it at first but in about 60 seconds it will start burning like crazy. If you do get any on you paint thinner (or any other good solvent) followed by soap and water will get it off your skin. If you don't have any solvent just use a lot of soap and water. If you tend to it fast enough you probably won't burn, if it's already started to burn it will subside about an hour after you clean it off but it won't leave any burn marks or redness on your skin.



Get a PAPER cup and pour a few ounces of the stripper in it. (it goes a long way) then use the chip brush to apply it to the paint you want to remove. In seconds the paint will start bubbling up and you'll want to remove it in about 5 - 10 minutes before the stripper dries. Do this in sections because it works pretty fast and you need to get the results off of there before the stripper dries. To remove it use a nylon scrub brush and a powerful stream of water.



Dry the area well as quickly as you can and if you're not ready to spray the bare metal with an etch primer (you have to use etch primer on bare steel) then wipe a thin coat of oil on it that you can clean off later with paint reducer or most any strong solvent (I use MEK) right before you spray the etch primer.



I only speak from experience and what I've learned from the pros. Sanding and/or a wire wheel is pretty much a waste of time when you can use a good paint stripper. The factory paint and clear coat are very tough but the proper stripper (with methylene chloride listed in the ingredients) makes short work of things. Sorry though, if you live in California they won't sell that kind of stripper, you'll have to use whatever they have that claims to be the strongest but you may have to do multiple applications to get all the paint off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Alternately (and possibly cheaper) go to a Home Depot type store or any large paint store and get a paint stripper that contains methylene chloride. It's almost a gel so it sticks in place and it will make short work of removing that tough Honda clear coat and paint often in one try. Also pick up a couple of those really cheap 0.49 paint brushes, often referred to as chip brushes. Home depot, etc will have them as will Harbor Freight and other discount tool places.



This is far better than the aircraft paint remover but with both make darn sure you've got a long sleeve shirt you can part with if it gets any on it. You DO NOT want to come in contact with this powerful stripper, if you accidentally get a drop on you you won't notice it at first but in about 60 seconds it will start burning like crazy. If you do get any on you paint thinner (or any other good solvent) followed by soap and water will get it off your skin. If you don't have any solvent just use a lot of soap and water. If you tend to it fast enough you probably won't burn, if it's already started to burn it will subside about an hour after you clean it off but it won't leave any burn marks or redness on your skin.



Get a PAPER cup and pour a few ounces of the stripper in it. (it goes a long way) then use the chip brush to apply it to the paint you want to remove. In seconds the paint will start bubbling up and you'll want to remove it in about 5 - 10 minutes before the stripper dries. Do this in sections because it works pretty fast and you need to get the results off of there before the stripper dries. To remove it use a nylon scrub brush and a powerful stream of water.



Dry the area well as quickly as you can and if you're not ready to spray the bare metal with an etch primer (you have to use etch primer on bare steel) then wipe a thin coat of oil on it that you can clean off later with paint reducer or most any strong solvent (I use MEK) right before you spray the etch primer.



I only speak from experience and what I've learned from the pros. Sanding and/or a wire wheel is pretty much a waste of time when you can use a good paint stripper. The factory paint and clear coat are very tough but the proper stripper (with methylene chloride listed in the ingredients) makes short work of things. Sorry though, if you live in California they won't sell that kind of stripper, you'll have to use whatever they have that claims to be the strongest but you may have to do multiple applications to get all the paint off.


Marshall,

Wish I had read this before I went to the store.

I bought the aircraft stripper already.

I will be dealing with it tomorrow.

We have (at work) a cold galvanizing spray. We use it when we need to protect raw steel from the elements and the normal powder coat has been removed. We use this one because it is 99.XX % zinc and is very conductive.

On the can it says it is a good primer for other paints. I was planning on using some of it so the frame members at contact points will conduct. I am not sure if it is important or not. I had though about just using conductive grease at those joints but...



In your opinion will it be a good enough primer or should I tape off the joints and only spray those contact ares with the galvanizing spray. Alternatively does the front member that the radiator mounts to have any reason to have electrical ground path back to the main frame? I do not SEE one but I would rather have one I do not need than need one I do not have.



Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So this is the engine with paint on it. It is much more gray in reality. The paint is still wet in this picture. The Gray was dry but I put clear on it and the clear is fresh when I took this picture.

How many coats of clear do y'all put on the engine?

I have one and I am thinking about a second.



Anyway



 

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Marshall,

Wish I had read this before I went to the store.

I bought the aircraft stripper already.



We have (at work) a cold galvanizing spray. We use it when we need to protect raw steel from the elements and the normal powder coat has been removed. We use this one because it is 99.XX % zinc and is very conductive.

On the can it says it is a good primer for other paints. I was planning on using some of it so the frame members at contact points will conduct. I am not sure if it is important or not. I had though about just using conductive grease at those joints but...



In your opinion will it be a good enough primer or should I tape off the joints and only spray those contact ares with the galvanizing spray. Alternatively does the front member that the radiator mounts to have any reason to have electrical ground path back to the main frame? I do not SEE one but I would rather have one I do not need than need one I do not have.



Thanks!


Depending on how well it works and how much you have to strip you may go through that can of aircraft stripper before you're half done. about half of it I've seen sold is nothing more then MEK in a spray can, although some does have the good methylene chloride in it.



I'd feather sand the paint that's near the area you stripped and mask behind that, I'm unsure how an etch primer (what you mention is just a higher zinc concentrate version of what they sell in the stores as etch primer) would interact with the clear coat that's on the untouched areas of the frame.



Unsure about your ground question, probably didn't have one but adding one won't hurt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
OK I have a new problem.

Now I think the engine looks great but it makes the rest of the bike look like crap.



Tomorrow I hope to reinstall the engine and i will have pictures of it all then.



For now here is the engine:







I really like the contrasting colors!
 

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nice job,i like the black valve covers as well.done the same on sunflower
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
nice job,i like the black valve covers as well.done the same on sunflower


Bandit,

Thanks! I have not noticed too many others who have painted their valve covers. It seems to be more in vogue to polish them to within an inch of their lives.



I have read through your sunflower project and I have to say your work is just great!

I was shocked it came out so well given this is one of my first painting experiences; well, that did not include a roller.





 
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